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See detailGiant Condyloma of the Cervix: An Uncommon Entity Associated With Low-risk Human Papilloma Virus Infection.
Parra-Herran, Carlos; Herfs, Michael ULg; Doria, Manuel et al

in American Journal of Surgical Pathology (2013), 37(2), 300-4

"Giant Condylomas" of the cervix are very uncommon, and have not been fully characterized in the English literature. We report 4 cases of cervical giant condyloma seen in our practice. Patients were ... [more ▼]

"Giant Condylomas" of the cervix are very uncommon, and have not been fully characterized in the English literature. We report 4 cases of cervical giant condyloma seen in our practice. Patients were predominantly young and presented with a cervical lesion producing bleeding or a mass effect. Biopsy/excision revealed a uniformly bland, exophytic squamous epithelial proliferation with viral cytopathic changes and absence of stromal invasion. Human papilloma virus types 6 and 11 were detected in all cases. Follow-up was uneventful without recurrence or spread. Giant condylomas of the cervix as defined in this report signify a benign albeit extensive variant of low-risk human papilloma virus infection. This term is proposed as a specific descriptor for such lesions and should be considered in the setting of any large well-differentiated exophytic cervical squamous lesion in young or immunosuppressed women. The term "giant condyloma of Buschke and Loewenstein" should be discontinued given the lack of specificity. [less ▲]

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See detailDiverse phenotypic profile of uterine tumors resembling ovarian sex cord tumors: an immunohistochemical study of 12 cases.
de Leval, Laurence ULg; Lim, Gkeok Stzuan Diana; Waltregny, David ULg et al

in American Journal of Surgical Pathology (2010), 34(12), 1749-61

BACKGROUND: Uterine tumors resembling ovarian sex cord tumors (UTROSCTs) are rare neoplasms thought to be of putative endometrial stromal origin and solely composed of sex cord elements. Our study aimed ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: Uterine tumors resembling ovarian sex cord tumors (UTROSCTs) are rare neoplasms thought to be of putative endometrial stromal origin and solely composed of sex cord elements. Our study aimed to delineate the immunophenotype of these tumors and to verify whether their morphology reflects true sex cord-like differentiation. DESIGN: Representative paraffin blocks from 12 UTROSCTs were selected after confirmation of the diagnosis. Cords and/or trabeculae were seen in all tumors, whereas tubules, diffuse areas, and a retiform pattern were present in 9, 6, and 2 cases, respectively. Tumors were stained for sex cord (inhibin, calretinin, WT1, and melan-A), epithelial (KL1 and epithelial membrane antigen), and smooth muscle markers (smooth muscle actin, desmin, smooth muscle myosin heavy chain, h-caldesmon, and histone deacetylase-8), CD10, HMB45, S100, and CD117. Intensity and percentage of staining were recorded. RESULTS: Six out of 12 tumors were positive for sex cord markers (inhibin 3 of 12, calretinin 4 of 12, WT1 4 of 12, and melan-A 3 of 11) with 4 tumors coexpressing more than one marker. Half of the UTROSCTs showed positivity for KL1, with 2 tumors coexpressing epithelial membrane antigen. All but one tumor expressed one or more smooth muscle markers, with smooth muscle actin, desmin and histone deacetylase-8 being most commonly expressed. CD10 was positive in 6 of 12 tumors, CD117 in 4 of 12, and S100 in 2 of 11 tumors, whereas HMB45 was negative in 11 tumors tested. CONCLUSIONS: UTROSCTs have a diverse immunohistochemical profile often coexpressing sex cord, epithelial, and smooth muscle markers. The expression of smooth muscle markers in these tumors does not imply a smooth muscle origin as endometrial and sex cord stromal tumors are not infrequently positive for these markers. Positivity for sex cord markers supports a true sex cord/steroid phenotype. Although the immunohistochemical profile of these tumors overlaps with that of endometrial stromal tumors with sex cord-like differentiation as well as ovarian sex cord stromal tumors, the origin of UTROSCT remains uncertain. [less ▲]

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See detailHigh frequency of JAZF1-JJAZ1 gene fusion in endometrial stromal tumors with smooth muscle differentiation by interphase FISH detection
Oliva, E.; de Leval, Laurence ULg; Soslow, R. A. et al

in American Journal of Surgical Pathology (2007), 31(8), 1277-1284

The most common cytogenetic alteration observed in low-grade endometrial stromal tumors (EST) is the t(7;17)(p15.-q21) translocation, resulting in the fusion of the JAZF1 and JJAZ1 genes. By reverse ... [more ▼]

The most common cytogenetic alteration observed in low-grade endometrial stromal tumors (EST) is the t(7;17)(p15.-q21) translocation, resulting in the fusion of the JAZF1 and JJAZ1 genes. By reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction, the translocation has been detected overall in one-third of ESTs. but only rarely in its variants. The purpose of this study was to develop a fluorescence in situ hybridization assay for detection of this translocation using archival paraffin-embedded samples of ESTs with smooth muscle differentiation and to assess the nature of the smooth Muscle component of these tumors. Representative paraffin blocks of 9 endometrial stromal nodules and I low-grade endometrial stromal sarcoma were collected for the study. In I case, the block selected also contained areas of sex cordlike differentiation. A fluorescence in situ hybridization probe set was designed to detect the t(7;17)(p15;q12) on tissue sections. Six Out of 10 collected ESTs were assessable. Fusion signals were detected in 3 out of 6 cases (50%) in both the conventional endometrial stromal and the smooth muscle components of the tumors. The tumor sample with sex cordlike differentiation harbored the fusion signal in all the 3 components. Out-results Support the contention that the endometrial stromal and smooth muscle components of these tumors have the same ori.-in, either from a common precursor cell with pluripotential differentiation or from endometrial stromal cells that have undergone smooth muscle metaplasia. Our results indicate that the detection of this chromosomal abnormality can be used to diagnose ESTs with smooth muscle differentiation when the smooth muscle component is predominant. [less ▲]

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See detailUse of histone deacetylase 8 (HDAC8), a new marker of smooth muscle differentiation, in the classification of mesenchymal tumors of the uterus
de Leval, Laurence ULg; Waltregny, David ULg; Boniver, Jacques ULg et al

in American Journal of Surgical Pathology (2006), 30(3), 319-327

Uterine smooth muscle tumors (SMTs) are usually recognized on the basis of their routine morphologic features; however, their distinction from endometrial stromal tumors (ESTs), the second most common ... [more ▼]

Uterine smooth muscle tumors (SMTs) are usually recognized on the basis of their routine morphologic features; however, their distinction from endometrial stromal tumors (ESTs), the second most common mesenchymal tumor of the uterus, is sometimes problematic. Histone deacetylases (HDACs) were originally identified as nuclear enzymes regulating histone acetylation. We have recently shown that in normal human tissues, HDAC8 is exclusively expressed in the cytoplasm of cells showing smooth muscle differentiation. In this study, we examined HDAC8 expression in SMTs and ESTs of the uterus to determine whether HDAC8 may be a useful diagnostic tool in the classification of problematic uterine mesenchymal tumors. HDAC8 immunohistochemical staining was performed in 15 leiomyomas (LMs), 9 highly cellular leiomyomas (HCLs), 8 epithelioid SMTs, 13 leiomyosarcomas (LMSs), and 17 ESTs, including 3 with sex-cord differentiation and 5 with smooth muscle differentiation. All tumors were also stained for other smooth muscle markers (desmin, h-caldesmon, smooth muscle actin [SMA], smooth muscle myosin heavy chain) and for CD 10. All LMs had moderate to strong expression of all smooth muscle markers. HDAC8 was detected in 8 of 9 HCLs and in all epithelioid SMTs (8 of 8); however, it was weak in 4 epithelioid SMTs. In contrast, desmin, h-caldesmon and smooth muscle myosin were positive in only 2 of 8, 1 of 8 and 4 of 8 epithelioid SMTs, respectively. All smooth muscle markers had similar frequency of staining in LMSs; however, HDAC8 showed overall moderate intensity compared with other smooth muscle markers, which showed stronger staining. HDAC8, h-caldesmon, and smooth muscle myosin did not stain conventional areas of ESTs or ESTs with sex-cord differentiation, whereas SMA and desmin were positive in those areas in 4 of 12 and 3 of 12 ESTs, respectively. Areas of smooth muscle differentiation in ESTs were positive for HDAC8 in all cases, but they were less constantly positive for the other smooth muscle markers. CD10 was expressed in most ESTs (14 of 17), but it was also positive in 15 of 45 SMTs. In conclusion: 1) HDAC8 seems to be a specific marker of SM differentiation because conventional ESTs and ESTs with sex-cord differentiation are negative for HDAC8, whereas areas of smooth muscle differentiation in these tumors are consistently positive; 2) HDAC8 gives similar results to those obtained with desmin, h-caldesmon, and smooth muscle myosin in both LMs and LMSs, although the staining for HDAC8 in LMSs tends to be less intense; 3) HDAC8 may be a more sensitive marker than desmin and h-caldesmon in epithelioid SMTs. Thus, HDAC8 detection may be useful in helping the differential diagnosis of uterine mesenchymal tumors. [less ▲]

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