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See detailTemple-Baraitser syndrome: a rare and possibly unrecognized condition.
Jacquinet, Adeline ULg; Gerard, Marion; Gabbett, Michael T et al

in American Journal of Medical Genetics. Part A (2010), 152A(9), 2322-6

Temple-Baraitser syndrome, previously described in two unrelated patients, is the association of severe mental retardation and abnormal thumbs and great toes. We report two additional unrelated patients ... [more ▼]

Temple-Baraitser syndrome, previously described in two unrelated patients, is the association of severe mental retardation and abnormal thumbs and great toes. We report two additional unrelated patients with Temple-Baraitser syndrome, review clinical and radiological features of previously reported cases and discuss mode of inheritance. Patients share a consistent pattern of anomalies: hypo or aplasia of the thumb and great toe nails and broadening and/or elongation of the thumbs and halluces, which have a tubular aspect. All patients were born to unrelated parents and occurred as a single occurrence in multiple sibships, suggesting sporadic inheritance from a de novo mutation mechanism. Comparative genomic hybridization in Patients 1, 2 and 3 did not reveal any copy number variations. We confirm that Temple-Baraitser syndrome represents a distinct syndrome, probably unrecognized, possibly caused by a de novo mutation in a not yet identified gene. [less ▲]

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See detailLong-term outcome of Leigh syndrome caused by the NARP-T8993C mtDNA mutation.
DEBRAY, François-Guillaume ULg; Lambert, Marie; Lortie, Anne et al

in American Journal of Medical Genetics. Part A (2007), 143A(17), 2046-51

Mutations at mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) nucleotide 8993 can cause neurogenic weakness, ataxia and retinitis pigmentosa (NARP syndrome), or maternally inherited Leigh syndrome (LS), with a correlation ... [more ▼]

Mutations at mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) nucleotide 8993 can cause neurogenic weakness, ataxia and retinitis pigmentosa (NARP syndrome), or maternally inherited Leigh syndrome (LS), with a correlation between the amount of mutant mtDNA and the severity of the neurological disease. The T8993C mutation is generally considered to be clinically milder than the T8993G mutation but when the level of heteroplasmy exceeds 90%, progressive neurodegeneration has been found. We report on a long-term follow-up of a patient who presented at 4 years of age with typical LS but showed an unexpected resolution of his symptoms and a favorable outcome. At 18 years of age, his neurological examination was near normal, with neither peripheral neuropathy nor retinopathy. mtDNA analysis identified the presence of T8993C mutation at high level (>95%) in the patient's blood leukocytes. This case report and literature review emphasizes the variability of the phenotypic expression of the T8993C mutation and the need for caution in predictive counseling in such patients. (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc. [less ▲]

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See detailRecurrent pancreatitis in mitochondrial cytopathy.
DEBRAY, François-Guillaume ULg; Drouin, Eric; Herzog, Denise et al

in American Journal of Medical Genetics. Part A (2006), 140(21), 2330-5

Diabetes mellitus and exocrine insufficiency are the commonest pancreatic manifestations of mitochondrial diseases. In contrast, pancreatitis has rarely been described in mitochondrial syndromes. We ... [more ▼]

Diabetes mellitus and exocrine insufficiency are the commonest pancreatic manifestations of mitochondrial diseases. In contrast, pancreatitis has rarely been described in mitochondrial syndromes. We report on a patient with Kearns-Sayre syndrome and recurrent episodes of acute pancreatitis for which no explanation could be found other than the associated mitochondrial dysfunction. Interestingly, pharmacological disruption of mitochondrial metabolism in various models as well as in patients can cause pancreatitis, further supporting this association. A diagnosis of pancreatitis should be considered in any patients with mitochondrial disease and recurrent abdominal pain. [less ▲]

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See detailThe natural history, including orofacial features of three patients with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, dermatosparaxis type (EDS type VIIC).
Malfait, Fransiska; De Coster, Peter; Hausser, Ingrid et al

in American Journal of Medical Genetics. Part A (2004), 131(1), 18-28

Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) dermatosparaxis type (type VIIC) and the related disease of cattle dermatosparaxis, are recessively inherited connective tissue disorders, caused by a deficient activity of ... [more ▼]

Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) dermatosparaxis type (type VIIC) and the related disease of cattle dermatosparaxis, are recessively inherited connective tissue disorders, caused by a deficient activity of procollagen I N-proteinase, the enzyme that excises the N-terminal propeptide in procollagen type I, type II, and type III. Although well documented in cattle, to date only seven human cases have been recorded, most of them aged under 2 years. We document the natural history of three patients with EDS dermatosparaxis type, two of whom have been reported before the age of 2 years, and one new patient. The phenotype of the patients, and especially the facial resemblance, is striking, making this a clinically recognizable condition. The most consistent anomalies during the first years of life are premature rupture of the membranes, extreme skin fragility and easy bruising, large fontanels, blue sclerae, puffy eyelids, micrognathia, umbilical hernia, and short fingers. Joint hypermobility becomes more important with age. The children are at risk for rupture of internal organs due to soft tissue fragility, as is illustrated by different internal events in two of the three patients described here. Orofacial features include micrognathia, a frontal open bite, and gingival hyperplasia with varying degrees of hyperkeratosis. The deciduous dentition shows abnormal morphology of the molars, obliteration of the tooth pulp, and severe enamel attrition. The permanent dentition shows agenesis and microdontia of several teeth. Tooth discoloration, dysplastic roots, and tooth pulp obliteration are present in a restricted number of permanent teeth. [less ▲]

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See detailSubtle trisomy 12q24.3 and subtle monosomy 22q13.3: Three new cases and review
Rodriguez, L.; Guardia, N. M.; Herens, Christian ULg et al

in American Journal of Medical Genetics. Part A (2003), 122A(2), 119-124

The high resolution G-bands (850 bands) karyotype have made it possible to identify small chromosome anomalies (5 megabases) which are now microscopically visible. New techniques have been improved, such ... [more ▼]

The high resolution G-bands (850 bands) karyotype have made it possible to identify small chromosome anomalies (5 megabases) which are now microscopically visible. New techniques have been improved, such as the Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) with subtelomeric probes, which can be employed to detect cryptic chromosome alterations not visible microscopically. We present three cases which had been remitted for a high resolution karyotype. The high resolution G-band karyotype and the FISH techniques led us to conclude that the three cases were carriers of a similar subtle chromosomal alteration. Case I is a new born female with developmental and psychomotor delay, hypotonia, and long limbs with arachnodactily. A high resolution G-band karyotype showed an abnormal chromosome 22. FISH techniques confirmed a der(22)t(12;22)(q24.31;q13.3). Case II is a 12-year-old girl, with growth retardation, long shaped face with thick eyebrows, smooth philtrum, and thin upper lip with severe mental retardation (still no language), with a phenotype very similar to that of his sister: long shaped face, thick eyebrows, smooth philtrum, and thin upper lip. A high resolution G-band karyotype also showed in Case II and III an abnormal chromosome 22, studied by FISH techniques which confirmed a der(22)t(12;-22)(q24.3; q13.3) in both cases. (C) 2003 Wiley-Liss, Inc. [less ▲]

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