References of "American Journal of Gastroenterology"
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See detailPrognostic Value of Serologic and Histologic Markers on Clinical Relapse in Ulcerative Colitis Patients With Mucosal Healing
Bessissow, Talat; Lemmens, Bart; Ferrante, Marc et al

in American Journal of Gastroenterology (2012), 11(107), 1684-92

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See detailDevelopment of the paris definition of early Crohn's disease for disease-modification trials: results of an international expert opinion process.
Peyrin-Biroulet, Laurent; Billioud, Vincent; D'Haens, Geert et al

in American Journal of Gastroenterology (2012), 107(12), 1770-6

We report the findings and outputs of an international expert opinion process to develop a definition of early Crohn's disease (CD) that could be used in future disease-modification trials. Nineteen ... [more ▼]

We report the findings and outputs of an international expert opinion process to develop a definition of early Crohn's disease (CD) that could be used in future disease-modification trials. Nineteen experts on inflammatory bowel diseases held an international expert opinion meeting to discuss and agree on a definition for early CD to be used in disease-modification trials. The process included literature searches for the relevant basic-science and clinical evidence. A published preliminary definition of early CD was used as the basis for development of a proposed definition that was discussed at the expert opinion meeting. The participants then derived a final definition, based on best current knowledge, that it is hoped will be of practical use in disease-modification trials in CD. [less ▲]

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See detailRate of Malignancies and Infections in a Large Single Center Cohort of IBD Patients Treated With Thiopurines and Anti-TNF-Antibodies.
Ochsenkühn, T; Steinborn, A; Beigel, F et al

in American Journal of Gastroenterology (2011)

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See detailTolerability of shortened infliximab infusion times in patients with inflammatory bowel diseases: a single-center cohort study.
Breynaert, Christine; Ferrante, Marc; Fidder, Herma et al

in American Journal of Gastroenterology (2011), 106(4), 778-85

OBJECTIVES: Scheduled maintenance therapy with infliximab decreases the risk of infusion reactions. Many centers have accelerated infusion times to 1 h in selected patients who tolerate 5 mg/kg infliximab ... [more ▼]

OBJECTIVES: Scheduled maintenance therapy with infliximab decreases the risk of infusion reactions. Many centers have accelerated infusion times to 1 h in selected patients who tolerate 5 mg/kg infliximab infusions. The aim of this study was to compare the tolerability of 1-h and 2-h infliximab infusions in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in a large single-center cohort. The primary end point was the incidence of infusion reactions in both groups. METHODS: A retrospective chart analysis of all IBD patients treated with infliximab was performed. Infusions in scheduled maintenance for at least 6 months from December 1994 until March 2009 were included. All patients were treated at the infusion unit or during hospitalization under standard operating procedures. Infusion parameters were prospectively recorded. From 2004, in patients tolerating at least four 2-h infusions, infusions were given over 1 h. RESULTS: As of March 2009, 953 patients with IBD (77.6% Crohn's disease, 22.4% ulcerative colitis) had been treated with infliximab. A total of 474 patients met the criteria of scheduled maintenance therapy. In total, 9,155 maintenance infusions were administered (4,307 over 1 h). No severe infusion reactions were documented. Mild acute reactions occurred in 0.6% (27/4,307) of the 1-h-infusion group and in 1.7% (80/4848) of the 2-h infusion group (P=0.0034). Delayed infusion reactions occurred in 0.2% of 1-h and 0.5% of 2-h infusion group patients (P=0.277). Loss of tolerability due to infusion reactions (1-h group 2.9% versus 2-h group 4.1%) was evenly distributed (P=0.34). None of the prespecified variables were predictive of infusion reactions in a multivariate analysis. CONCLUSIONS: In patients with IBD tolerating 2-h infusions of infliximab scheduled maintenance therapy, the infusion time can be shortened to 1 h with good tolerability. No severe reactions were observed and no predictors of infusion reactions were identified. [less ▲]

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See detailRisk Of Malignancies In A Single Center Cohort Of IBD-Patients Treated with Immunosuppressives and Anti-TNF-antibodies
Steinborn, A; Beigel, F; Breiteneicher, S et al

in American Journal of Gastroenterology (2011)

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See detailMucosal gene expression of cell adhesion molecules, chemokines, and chemokine receptors in patients with inflammatory bowel disease before and after infliximab treatment.
Arijs, Ingrid; De Hertogh, Gert; Machiels, Kathleen et al

in American Journal of Gastroenterology (2011), 106(4), 748-61

OBJECTIVES: Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is characterized by a continuous influx of leukocytes into the gut wall. This migration is regulated by cell adhesion molecules (CAMs), and selective ... [more ▼]

OBJECTIVES: Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is characterized by a continuous influx of leukocytes into the gut wall. This migration is regulated by cell adhesion molecules (CAMs), and selective antimigration therapies have been developed. This study investigated the effect of infliximab therapy on the mucosal gene expression of CAMs in IBD. METHODS: Mucosal gene expression of 69 leukocyte/endothelial CAMs and E-cadherin was investigated in 61 IBD patients before and after first infliximab infusion and in 12 normal controls, using Affymetrix gene expression microarrays. Quantitative reverse transcriptase-PCR (qRT-PCR), immunohistochemistry, and western blotting were used to confirm the microarray data. RESULTS: When compared with control colons, the colonic mucosal gene expression of most leukocyte/endothelial adhesion molecules was upregulated and E-cadherin gene expression was downregulated in active colonic IBD (IBDc) before therapy, with no significant colonic gene expression differences between ulcerative colitis and colonic Crohn's disease. Infliximab therapy restored the upregulations of leukocyte CAMs in IBDc responders to infliximab that paralleled the disappearance of the inflammatory cells from the colonic lamina propria. Also, the colonic gene expression of endothelial CAMs and of most chemokines/chemokine receptors returned to normal after therapy in IBDc responders, and only CCL20 and CXCL1-2 expression remained increased after therapy in IBDc responders vs. control colons. When compared with control ileums, the ileal gene expression of MADCAM1, THY1, PECAM1, CCL28, CXCL1, -2, -5, -6, and -11, and IL8 was increased and CD58 expression was decreased in active ileal Crohn's disease (CDi) before therapy, and none of the genes remained dysregulated after therapy in CDi responders vs. control ileums. This microarray study identified a number of interesting targets for antiadhesion therapy including PECAM1, IL8, and CCL20, besides the currently studied alpha4beta7 integrin-MADCAM1 axis. CONCLUSIONS: Our data demonstrate that many leukocyte/endothelial CAMs and chemokines/chemokine receptors are upregulated in inflamed IBD mucosa. Controlling the inflammation with infliximab restores most of these dysregulations in IBD. These results show that at least part of the mechanism of anti-tumor necrosis factor-alpha therapy goes through downregulation of certain adhesion molecules. [less ▲]

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See detailTransmission of CARD15 (NOD2) variants within families of patients with inflammatory bowel disease.
Esters, Nele; Pierik, Marie; Van Steen, Kristel ULg et al

in American Journal of Gastroenterology (2004), 99(2), 299-305

OBJECTIVES: Three single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in CARD15 have been independently associated with Crohn's disease (CD). Since nothing is known about the transmission of these variants within ... [more ▼]

OBJECTIVES: Three single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in CARD15 have been independently associated with Crohn's disease (CD). Since nothing is known about the transmission of these variants within families, this was the subject of our study in Flemish patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and their healthy relatives. METHODS: A cohort of 1,670 individuals (570 CD, 173 UC, 165 healthy controls, 762 first-degree unaffected relatives of CD patients) was genotyped for Arg702Trp, Gly908Arg, and Leu1007fsinsC. Mutant allele and carrier frequencies were compared between groups. Segregation patterns were compared using a bivariate Dale model. RESULTS: The carrier prevalence of CARD15 variants for CD patients was 46.3%, compared to 20.6% for healthy controls and 22.0% for ulcerative colitis (UC) patients (both p < 0.0001). An increased carriage rate of CARD15 variants was observed in unaffected relatives of CD patients (37.3%; p < 0.0001 vs controls), although this was significantly lower than in the CD patients (p = 0.001). Paternal transmission gave a 5.17-fold higher chance for the child to develop the disease compared to maternal transmission (95% CI [1.59, 16.78]; p = 0.0063). UC patients belonging to mixed IBD families carried significantly more mutations (42.3%) compared to other UC patients (18.4%) (p < 0.01). CONCLUSIONS: Maternal transmission of the CARD15 variant allele is associated with a lower proportion of affected individuals compared to paternal transmission. Therefore, maternal transmission does not carry an increased risk of transmission as does paternal transmission. The increased mutation carriage in unaffected siblings of CD patients and in UC patients belonging to mixed families suggests that other factors than CARD15 contribute to the eventual disease expression. [less ▲]

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See detailSevere lower gastrointestinal bleeding in Crohn's disease: Successful control with infliximab
Berlaiche, J.; Louis, Edouard ULg

in American Journal of Gastroenterology (2002), 97(12), 3210-3211

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See detailDemographic and clinical parameters influencing the short-term outcome of anti-tumor necrosis factor (infliximab) treatment in Crohn's disease
Vermeire, S.; Louis, Edouard ULg; Carbonez, A. et al

in American Journal of Gastroenterology (2002), 97(9), 2357-2363

OBJECTIVE: Infliximab is an effective treatment for refractory or fistulizing Crohn's disease (CD). However, about 30% of patients do not respond to infliximab for unknown reasons. Identifying predictive ... [more ▼]

OBJECTIVE: Infliximab is an effective treatment for refractory or fistulizing Crohn's disease (CD). However, about 30% of patients do not respond to infliximab for unknown reasons. Identifying predictive factors of response is important for optimizing clinical management and for better understanding infliximab's mechanisms of action. The aim of this study was to assess whether demographic or clinical parameters influence short-term response to infliximab. METHODS: The first 240 CD patients of the Belgian Infliximab Expanded Access Program were studied for response to infliximab treatment and assessed at 4 (refractory luminal CD) or 10 wk (fistulizing CD) after the first infusion. Detailed demographic and clinical information on age, sex, type of disease (fistulizing or refractory), Crohn's Disease Activity Index score, C-reactive protein (CRP), smoking habits, disease duration, localization of disease, concomitant medication, and previous surgery were obtained from all patients. Logistic regression and decision tree analysis were performed. RESULTS: There were 73.5% responders and 26.5% nonresponders to treatment. Stepwise logistic regression identified age (OR = 0.971, 95% CI = 0.947-0.995, p = 0.018), isolated ileitis (OR = 0.359, 95% CI 0.177-0.728, p = 0.004), and previous surgery (OR 0.429, 95% CI = 0.233-0.787, p = 0.006) as inversely correlated with response, whereas isolated colitis (OR = 1.905, 95% CI = 1.010-3.597, p = 0.046) and concomitant immunosuppressive treatment (OR = 2.670, 95% CI = 1.430-5.016, p = 0.0022) were positively correlated with response to infliximab. Surprisingly, smoking habits were not retained as predictors for response. Decision tree analysis provided a working algorithm based on age and immunosuppressive treatment that warrants further exploration. CONCLUSIONS: In this large cohort of infliximab-treated CD patients, young age, Crohn's colitis, and concomitant immunosuppressive treatment were identified as independent variables favoring short-term response to infliximab. [less ▲]

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See detailSerological markers for prediction of response to anti-tumor necrosis factor treatment in Crohn's disease
Esters, N.; Vermeire, S.; Joossens, S. et al

in American Journal of Gastroenterology (2002), 97(6), 1458-1462

OBJECTIVES: The use of monoclonal anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF) antibodies (infliximab, Remicade) is a new therapeutic approach for severe refractory luminal or fistulizing, Crohn's disease (CD ... [more ▼]

OBJECTIVES: The use of monoclonal anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF) antibodies (infliximab, Remicade) is a new therapeutic approach for severe refractory luminal or fistulizing, Crohn's disease (CD). However, up to 30% of patients do not respond to this treatment. So far, no parameters predictive of response to anti-TNT have been identified. Our aim was to determine whether serological markers ASCA (anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae antibodies) or pANCA (perinuclear antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies) could identify Crohn's patients likely to benefit from anti-TNF therapy. METHODS: Serum samples of 279 CID patients were analyzed for ASCA and pANCA before anti-TNF therapy. A blinded physician determined clinical response at week 4 (refractory luminal CD) or week 10 (fistulizing CD) after the first infusion of infliximab (5 mg/kg). RESULTS: Overall, there was no relationship between ASCA or pANCA and response to therapy. However, lower response rates were observed for patients with refractory intestinal disease carrying the pANCA+/ASCA- combination, although this lacked significance (p = 0.067). CONCLUSIONS: In this cohort of infliximab-treated patients, neither ASCA nor pANCA could predict response to treatment. However, the combination pANCA+/ASCA- might warrant further investigation for its value in predicting nonresponse in patients with refractory luminal disease. [less ▲]

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See detailAcute Lower Gastrointestinal Bleeding in Crohn's Disease: Characteristics of a Unique Series of 34 Patients. Belgian Ibd Research Group
Belaiche, Jacques ULg; Louis, Edouard ULg; D'Haens, Geert et al

in American Journal of Gastroenterology (1999), 94(8), 2177-81

OBJECTIVE: Acute lower gastrointestinal bleeding is a rare complication of Crohn's disease, which represents a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge. The aim of this study was to define epidemiological ... [more ▼]

OBJECTIVE: Acute lower gastrointestinal bleeding is a rare complication of Crohn's disease, which represents a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge. The aim of this study was to define epidemiological characteristics and therapeutic options of hemorrhagic forms of Crohn's disease. METHODS: Thirty-four cases of hemorrhagic forms of Crohn's disease were studied retrospectively. Acute lower gastrointestinal hemorrhage was defined as acute rectal bleeding originating in diseased bowel and requiring a transfusion of at least 2 units of red blood cells within 24 h. Upper gastrointestinal tract hemorrhage or anal lesions and postoperative bleeding were excluded. RESULTS: Mean age at time of hemorrhage was 34.2 +/- 14 yr. Mean duration of disease before the hemorrhage was 5.6 +/- 6 yr. The hemorrhage occurred during a flare up of the disease in 35% of cases. The hemorrhage revealed Crohn's disease in 23.5% of cases. The hemorrhage was more frequent in colonic disease (85%) than in isolated small bowel disease (15%) (p < 0.0001). The origin of bleeding was identified in 65% of cases, by colonoscopy (60%), by angiography (3 patients), or at surgery (1 patient). The bleeding lesion was an ulcer in 95% of cases, most often in the left colon. The treatment was surgical in 20.5% (colectomy in 36%), endoscopical (7 patients, including 5 successes), or medical. Hemorrhage recurred in 12 patients (35%) within a mean time of 3 yr (4 days-8 yr), requiring surgery in 3 cases. No death was observed. CONCLUSIONS: This study performed in a series characterized by a nonsurgical recruitment, the largest to date, shows that hemorrhagic forms of Crohn's disease may reveal disease in 23.5%, occurs in quiescent Crohn's disease in two-thirds of cases. Given the potential efficacy of endoscopical or medical treatment, as well as the absence of mortality, a conservative approach may be suggested as first-line therapy in the majority of patients. [less ▲]

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