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See detailDeterminant of fat mass percentage and absolute fat-free mass in preterm infants at the time of hospital discharge
Simon, Laure; Frondas-Chauty, Anne; SENTERRE, Thibault ULg et al

in American Journal of Clinical Nutrition (2014), 100(1), 98-104

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See detailModulating absorption and postprandial handling of dietary fatty acids by structuring fat in the meal : a randomized cross-over clinical trial
Vors, C; Pineau, G; Gabert, L et al

in American Journal of Clinical Nutrition (2013), 97(1), 23-36

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See detailSerum transferrin receptor concentration indicates increased erythropoiesis in Kenyan children with asymptomatic malaria.
Verhoef, H.; West, C. E.; Ndeto, P. et al

in American Journal of Clinical Nutrition (2001), 74(6), 767-75

BACKGROUND: Serum transferrin receptor concentrations indicate both erythropoietic activity and the deficit of functional iron in the erythron. In contrast with serum ferritin concentrations, serum ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: Serum transferrin receptor concentrations indicate both erythropoietic activity and the deficit of functional iron in the erythron. In contrast with serum ferritin concentrations, serum transferrin receptor concentrations are not or are only marginally influenced by the inflammatory response to infection. OBJECTIVE: We assessed iron status and examined the relation between serum transferrin receptor concentrations and malaria in children aged 2-36 mo who were asymptomatic for malaria. DESIGN: This was a community-based cluster survey (n = 318). RESULTS: Prevalences of malaria, anemia (hemoglobin concentration <110 g/L), iron deficiency (serum ferritin concentration <12 microg/L), and iron deficiency anemia were 18%, 69%, 53%, and 46%, respectively. Malaria was associated with lower mean hemoglobin concentrations (92.7 compared with 104.1 g/L; P = 0.0001) and higher geometric mean serum concentrations of transferrin receptor (11.4 compared with 7.8 mg/L; P = 0.005), ferritin (21.6 compared with 11.9 microg/L; P = 0.05), and C-reactive protein (12.5 compared with 6.8 mg/L; P = 0.004). There was no evidence for an association between serum concentrations of C-reactive protein and transferrin receptor. Children with malaria had higher serum transferrin receptor concentrations than expected for the degree of anemia, even after adjustment for inflammation indicated by serum C-reactive protein concentration quartiles (P = 0.02). CONCLUSIONS: Our findings are consistent with the notion that malaria-induced hemolysis is accompanied by increased erythropoiesis. Serum transferrin receptor concentration is not useful for detecting iron deficiency in individuals with malaria. Individuals with high concentrations of serum C-reactive protein or similar acute phase reactants should be excluded from analysis if serum ferritin concentrations <12 microg/L are to be used to measure iron deficiency in malaria-endemic areas. [less ▲]

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See detailDifferences in associations of familial and nutritional factors with serum lipids between boys and girls: the Luxembourg Child Study.
Guillaume, Michèle ULg; Lapidus, L.; Lambert, A.

in American Journal of Clinical Nutrition (2000), 72(2), 384-8

BACKGROUND: Sex differences in the effects of genetic and environmental factors on circulating lipids have been examined mainly in adults, in whom the influences of sex steroid hormones are well known ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: Sex differences in the effects of genetic and environmental factors on circulating lipids have been examined mainly in adults, in whom the influences of sex steroid hormones are well known. OBJECTIVE: Our objective was to determine the effect of sex on genetic and environmental influences on serum lipids in prepubertal boys and girls. DESIGN: Children aged 6-8, 8-10, and 10-12 y (n = 1028) were selected at random in the Belgian province of Luxembourg, a region in Europe with a high prevalence of risk factors for cardiovascular disease and diabetes. Blood glucose and serum cholesterol, triacylglycerol, and insulin concentrations were measured, and anthropometric data and blood pressure were recorded. Familial data were obtained from standardized questionnaires. Nutritional status was obtained from a 3-d record. Participation was 70.3% of the primary cohort. RESULTS: Cholesterol, triacylglycerol, and insulin values were among the highest recorded in studies of children. In girls, cholesterol correlated positively with the energy density of intake of saturated fat (r = 0.13, P = 0.001), cholesterol (r = 0.11, P = 0.006), and protein (r = 0.12, P = 0.007) and negatively with the ratio of polyunsaturated to saturated fat intake (r = -0.14, P = 0.001) and the energy density of carbohydrate intake (r = -0.11, P = 0.019). In boys, no such relations were found. Triacylglycerol was not significantly related to nutritional factors. Consistent, independent relations were found between reported elevated cholesterol concentrations in the parental and grandparental generation and cholesterol (r = 0.101, P = 0.011) and triacylglycerol (r = 0.09, P = 0.03) in boys. No such associations were found in girls. CONCLUSION: Environmental and genetic factors may have different effects on serum cholesterol in girls and boys. [less ▲]

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See detailDefining obesity in childhood: current practice.
Guillaume, Michèle ULg

in American Journal of Clinical Nutrition (1999), 70(1), 126-30

A survey of information from 26 countries was performed to examine the methods, cutoff points, and reference materials used to define obesity in childhood and adolescence. The body mass index (in kg/m2 ... [more ▼]

A survey of information from 26 countries was performed to examine the methods, cutoff points, and reference materials used to define obesity in childhood and adolescence. The body mass index (in kg/m2) was used frequently, as well as several other methods. Reference materials used were often based on national surveys, although reference data from other countries were sometimes used. The data presented was often insufficient to judge the representativeness of the reference material. Cutoff points varied considerably. Available data allow neither a meaningful international estimation of the prevalence of obesity nor international comparisons. Although associated with considerable problems, this situation can be improved with an international consensus which, by necessity, will be riddled with uncertainties and compromises. [less ▲]

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See detailAcute Functional Iron Deficiency in Obese Subjects During a Very-Low-Energy All-Protein Diet
Beguin, Yves ULg; Grek, Vincent; Weber, Georges ULg et al

in American Journal of Clinical Nutrition (1997), 66(1), 75-9

We examined whether a very-low-energy all-protein diet (VLED) would produce detectable changes in iron as well as in other trace elements. Twenty-five obese patients consumed for 2 wk a VLED containing 70 ... [more ▼]

We examined whether a very-low-energy all-protein diet (VLED) would produce detectable changes in iron as well as in other trace elements. Twenty-five obese patients consumed for 2 wk a VLED containing 70 g protein after a 1-wk period during which total daily energy intake was progressively reduced to 1.26 MJ. Serum iron fell sharply by approximately equal to 50% (P < 0.0001), and despite a small decrease in total-iron-binding capacity, transferrin saturation decreased from 30 +/- 11% to 18 +/- 5% (P < 0.0001). Serum ferritin did not change significantly but serum soluble transferrin receptor (sTfR), an indicator of iron deficiency, increased progressively from 4630 +/- 1110 to 6070 +/- 1390 micrograms/L (P < 0.0001). Changes in sTfR correlated inversely with prior changes in serum iron. Changes in iron metabolism did not translate into changes in erythropoiesis or red cell indexes, but the white blood cell count decreased from 7.3 +/- 1.6 to 6.2 +/- 1.9 x 10(9)/L (P < 0.002). There was no evidence of deficiency for the other trace elements and minerals tested. Daily supplementation with 200 mg Fe in 18 other subjects only partially corrected these observations despite some increase in iron stores. These results indicate that during a 2-wk VLED serum iron is significantly depressed, inducing functional tissue iron deficiency too short in duration to produce alterations in red blood cell indexes. These changes are not mediated by absolute iron deficiency, inflammation, or protein malnutrition but could be related to alterations in the iron storage and release behavior of the reticuloendothelial cell during energy deprivation alone. [less ▲]

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