References of "African Journal of Microbiology Research [=AJMR]"
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See detailCharacterization of Lactobacillus strains isolated from Algerian children faeces for their probiotic properties
Bahri, F.; Lejeune, Annick ULg; Dubois-Dauphin, R. et al

in African Journal of Microbiology Research [=AJMR] (2014), 8(3), 297-303

Lactic acid bacteria termed probiotics have preventive as well as curative effects on several types of diarrhoea of different aetiologies. The main objective of this study was to screen lactobacilli ... [more ▼]

Lactic acid bacteria termed probiotics have preventive as well as curative effects on several types of diarrhoea of different aetiologies. The main objective of this study was to screen lactobacilli strains having probiotic traits, isolated from Algerian healthy children faeces on the purpose of using them further in children diarrheal illnesses. One hundred and twenty (120) lactic acid bacteria isolates were selected from faecal samples of healthy Algerian children aged between five and ten years. Gram positive rods and catalase negative bacteria (52 isolates) were screened, in vitro, for their probiotic potential properties including ability to survive in simulated gastro-intestinal conditions, adherence to Caco-2 cells and their antimicrobial activity. The results show that only five strains resisted in simulated gastric juice at pH 1.5 and pepsin. Four of them were resistant to simulated intestinal conditions at pH 8 and pancreatin and have a good adherence. In the end, three of them were retained as they display interesting probiotic profiles characterized by a strong antimicrobial effect against some intestinal pathogenic bacteria. They were identified by 16S rDNA sequencing as Lactobacillus plantarum F12, Lactobacillus brevis G6 and Lactobacillus paracasei B13. [less ▲]

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See detailA new semi-selective agar medium for recovery and enumeration of antagonistic yeast, Pichia guilliermondii strain Z1 from orange fruit surface
Lahlali, Rachid; Hamadi, Younes; El Guilli, Mohamed et al

in African Journal of Microbiology Research [=AJMR] (2013), 7(25), 3209-3216

The aim of this work was to develop a semi-selective medium for recovery and enumeration of Pichia guilliermondii strain Z1, a reliable biocontrol agent against postharvest pathogens of citrus fruit, and ... [more ▼]

The aim of this work was to develop a semi-selective medium for recovery and enumeration of Pichia guilliermondii strain Z1, a reliable biocontrol agent against postharvest pathogens of citrus fruit, and to assess the population dynamic of this antagonistic yeast on orange fruit in relation to incubation temperature and time of incubation. PDA is the basal medium used in this study which allows the antagonistic strain Z1 source of carbon and nutrients. Different chemicals (thiophanate-methyl, thiabendazole, thiram and imazalil) and antibiotics (hygromycin, tetracyclin, ampicillin and chloramphenicol) have been tested individually and based on the plating efficiency up to 90%, 40 combinations have been assayed between antibiotics and fungicides. Ten combinations proved to be highly selective against citrus pathogens and laboratory microflora, but only one consisting of tetracyclin (1 g/L) and thiabendazole (60 mg/L) was retained based on plating efficiency up to 99%, total selectivity against laboratory microflora, epiphytic microflora from washed orange fruit and lower cost. The semi-selective medium TET-TBZ-PDA has been used to assess the impact of temperature and incubation time on the survival of strain Z1. It appears that population density was significantly influenced by both factors and the highest population size was recorded at 25°C followed by 5 and 35°C, respectively. This strain required a time of adaptation before entering the exponential growth phase with a maximum growth observed at 25°C relative to others. The semi-selective medium TETTBZ- PDA could be an efficient and valuable way to track the population density of this strain on the surface of orange when applied pre-or postharvest. This semi-selective medium may also aid in reaching a population density allowing a better efficiency in relation to environmental conditions. [less ▲]

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See detailProduction and oil-emulsion formulation of Cadophora malorum and Alternaria jacinthicola, two biocontrol agents against Water Hyacinth (Eichhornia crassipes)
Dagno, Karim ULg; Lahlali, Rachid; Diourté, Mamourou et al

in African Journal of Microbiology Research [=AJMR] (2011), 5(8), 924-929

Cadophora malorum isolate Mln715 and Alternaria jacinthicola strain MUCL 53159 are under <br />development as biocontrol agents against Water Hyacinth (Eichhornia crassipes) in Mali. Production of spores ... [more ▼]

Cadophora malorum isolate Mln715 and Alternaria jacinthicola strain MUCL 53159 are under <br />development as biocontrol agents against Water Hyacinth (Eichhornia crassipes) in Mali. Production of spores of these agents on locally available substrates (Water Hyacinth, powdered paddy rice chaff, wheat semolina) was assessed with a view to mass production. The C. malorum isolate sporulated best on Water Hyacinth (4.08 × 107 spores ml-1), followed by wheat (1.06 ×107 spores ml-1), whereas A. jacinthicola produced more spores on paddy rice chaff and wheat (0.24 x 107 spores ml-1). The severity of the damage caused by each pathogen was evaluated in the greenhouse and in the field. Under both greenhouse and field conditions, the biocontrol efficacy of the fungal isolates was improved with (unrefined) Carapa procera (L.) oil or (refined) palm oil, supplemented with soybean lecithin and Tween 20. When such a formulation was used, the incubation time was 4 to 5 days in the greenhouse and 7 to 9 days on the field, and the damage severity (DS) recorded 6 weeks after treatment varied from 87.02 to 93.13% in the greenhouse and from 59.11 to 63.00% in the field. For unformulated C. malorum and A. jacinthicola respectively, the incubation times were longer and the DS values were only 22.11 and 29.05% in the greenhouse and 12.05 and 15.15% on the field. Our results highlight good substrates for mass production of these mycoherbicides and demonstrate the ability of vegetable oil formulations to improve their efficacy. [less ▲]

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See detailDiversity, phylogenetic relationship and antibacterial potential of Bifidobacterium species isolated from raw milk production chain in Abidjan (Côte d'Ivoire)
Kouamé-Sina, Sylvie Mireille; Dadié, Adjéhi; Makita, Kohei et al

in African Journal of Microbiology Research [=AJMR] (2011), 5(21), 3394-3403

The local dairy commodity, from farm to retail point, is informal and often escapes safety surveillance and results in high contamination of local milk by pathogens. The objective of this study was to ... [more ▼]

The local dairy commodity, from farm to retail point, is informal and often escapes safety surveillance and results in high contamination of local milk by pathogens. The objective of this study was to determine the biodiversity of Bifidobacterium species in the informal dairy production chain in Abidjan and evaluate their potential antibacterial activity against pathogens. Bifidobacterium species were identified after sequencing of hsp60 genes. Results showed that Bifidobacterium were present in 9% of samples. Milkers' hands (14%) and cows’s udders (14%) were the most contaminated with Bifidobacterium. These isolates belong to five different species. Most Bifidobacterium isolated are Bifidobacterium minimum (53%) and Bifidobacterium pseudolongum subsp. Globosum (24.4%). The other strains are composed of one strain of Bifidobacterium thermophilum, Bifidobacterium thermacidophilum subsp. suis and Bifidobacterium magnum. The isolated Bifidobacterium species have antibacterial activities that are not related to bacteriocins production, but to organic acids production (65%), which exert in vitro inhibitory action against Listeria monocytogenes, Salmonella hadar and Salmonella typhimurium, Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli O27 and Escherichia coli O157H7. However, ensuring milk safety along the local milk production chain requires implementation of good hygiene practices together with adapted technology, such as fermentation. [less ▲]

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See detailPathogenic and molecular characterization of Pythium species inducing root rot symptoms of common bean in Rwanda
Nzungize, J.; Geps, P.; Buruchara, R. et al

in African Journal of Microbiology Research [=AJMR] (2011), 5

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See detailIsolation and characterisation of new spore-forming lactic acid bacteria with prospects of use in food fermentations and probiotic preparations
Bayane, Ali; Diawara, B.; Dubois Dauphin, Robin ULg et al

in African Journal of Microbiology Research [=AJMR] (2010), 4(11), 1016-1025

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See detailBeneficial effects of Bacillus subtilis on field-grown tomato in Burundi : reduction of local Fusarium disease and growth promotion.
Nihorimbere, V.; Ongena, Marc ULg; Cawoy, Hélène ULg et al

in African Journal of Microbiology Research [=AJMR] (2010), 4

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See detailIn Vitro Detection And Characterization Of Bacteriocin-Like Inhibitory Activity Of Lactic Acid Bacteria (Lab) Isolated From Senegalese Local Food Products
Diop, Mb.; Dubois Dauphin, Robin ULg; Dortu, C. et al

in African Journal of Microbiology Research [=AJMR] (2008), 2(8),

The prevalence of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) in Senegalese local food products was determined to be 109 CFU/g in millet flour and milk products, and 103 CFU/g in seafood products. These food products are ... [more ▼]

The prevalence of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) in Senegalese local food products was determined to be 109 CFU/g in millet flour and milk products, and 103 CFU/g in seafood products. These food products are generally preserved by spontaneous fermentation (without addition of starters). Of 220 lactic acid bacteria strains randomly selected from such products, 12 isolates capable of producing bacteriocin-like substances (bac+) were detected. Based on the use of API 50 CH test kits and 16S rDNA sequencing, 11 isolates were characterized as Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis strains and one as an Enterococcus faecium strain. Nisin- and enterocin B-encoding genes were respectively identified in the bac+ lactococcal strains and the E. faecium strain. Since the bac+ Lc. lactis strains were isolated from different products, it suggests a high potential of growth by these strains in variable ecological environments. Expression of the nisin gene was indicated for one of the lactococcal strains, designated Lc. lactis subsp. lactis CWBI-B1410, which showed the highest in vitro antibacterial activity. An antibacterial preparation prepared from the CWBI-B1410 strain showed many similarities with nisin with regards to its inhibitory effects, heat resistance, protease sensitivity profile, as well as retention time of the antibacterial substances on a C18 column. These results suggest that a nisin-like substance is produced by the CWBI-B1410 strain. This strain has been selected for application as an additional barrier to supplementation with sodium chloride as a means to improve the bacterial quality of fish commodities in Senegal. [less ▲]

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