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See detailEffect of inventory plot patterns in the floristic analysis of tropical woodland and dense forest
Houeto, Georges; Glele Kakai, Romain L.; Salako, Valère et al

in African Journal of Ecology (2013), 51(3),

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See detailDispersal and predation of diaspores of Coula edulis Baill. in an evergreen forest of Gabon
Moupela, Christian ULg; Doucet, Jean-Louis ULg; Daïnou, Kasso ULg et al

in African Journal of Ecology (2013), 52

The African walnut ( Coula edulis) is a tree species of African evergreen forests, the seeds of which are collected and traded by African people. Many animal species consume African walnut diaspores ... [more ▼]

The African walnut ( Coula edulis) is a tree species of African evergreen forests, the seeds of which are collected and traded by African people. Many animal species consume African walnut diaspores; however, their roles as dispersers or predators have yet to be clarified. In this study, we present observations conducted in two different habitats of a Gabonese region over a 3-year period. The originality of this research resides in the combination of three complementary approaches: (i) the use of camera-traps (ii) the exploration of land rodent burrows and (iii) the examination of elephant dung. In total, 408 camera-trap photographs have shown seven animal species involved in the dispersal/predation of C. edulis. Among these seven frugivorous species, the bush pig was found to be the main consumer and predator of seeds. Land rodents (Muridae) are potential predators, as they damaged the seeds and buried them deep in the soil. They may also play a role in the regeneration process as a result of the loss of seeds during transportation. Finally, no seeds appeared to emerge intact from elephant faeces. These results indicate that the natural regeneration rate of this tree species is low, unless other complex mecha-nisms are involved. [less ▲]

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See detailDensity of herbaceous plants and distribution of western gorillas in different habitat types in south-east Cameroon
Willie, Jacob; Petre, Charles-Albert ULg; Tagg, Nikki et al

in African Journal of Ecology (2013), 51

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See detailDiversity and aboveground biomass in three tropical forest types in the Dja Biosphere Reserve, Cameroon
Djuikouo, Marie Noël Kamdem; Doucet, Jean-Louis ULg; Nguembou, Charlemagne K. et al

in African Journal of Ecology (2010), 48

We present tree community diversity, species composition, basal area and aboveground biomass of three forest types in the Dja Biosphere Reserve, in South-East Cameroon, part of the contiguous tropical ... [more ▼]

We present tree community diversity, species composition, basal area and aboveground biomass of three forest types in the Dja Biosphere Reserve, in South-East Cameroon, part of the contiguous tropical forest of the Congo Basin. A total of fourteen, 1 ha, plots were established in heterogeneous terra firme forests (TFF), Gilbertiodendron dewevrei forests (GDF) and periodically flooded forests (PFF). A total of 281 tree species with diameter ‡10 cm were recorded. The Shannon diversity index was significantly higher in TFF (5.7 ± 0.28) and PFF (5.6 ± 0.23) than in GDF (2.29 ± 0.48) (ANOVA, F2,11 = 139.75, P < 0.001). While tree density did not differ between forest types (F2,11 = 3.50, P = 0.06), basal area differed significantly (F2,11 = 7.38, P = 0.009), as did aboveground biomass (F2,11 = 17.95, P < 0.001). Mean AGB values were respectively, 596.1 ± 62.24, 401.67 ± 58.06 and 383.14 ± 61.91 Mg ha)1 in GDF, TFF and PFF. Variation in the abundance of trees with large diameter was the main reason for these differences. Few dominant species made the greatest contribution to the AGB. G. dewevrei, accounted for 83% of AGB in GDF, Penthaclethra macrophylla for 9.9% in TFF and Uapaca heudolotii for 10.6% in PFF. The importance of preserving G. dewevrei forest in the context of ‘Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and forest Degradation’ (REDD) policies is discussed. [less ▲]

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See detailHas the final countdown to wildlife extinction in Northern Central African Republic begun ?
Bouché, Philippe ULg; Renaud, Pierre-Cyril; Lejeune, Philippe ULg et al

in African Journal of Ecology (2010), 48(4), 1-10

The wildlife populations of Northern Central African Republic experienced precipitous declines during the 1970s and 1980s. While anecdotes coming out of the region indicate that the wildlife populations ... [more ▼]

The wildlife populations of Northern Central African Republic experienced precipitous declines during the 1970s and 1980s. While anecdotes coming out of the region indicate that the wildlife populations remain under serious threat, little is known about their status. An aerial sample count was carried out in the Northern Central African Republic at the end of the dry season in June 2005 and covered an 85,000 km2 complex landscape containing national parks, hunting reserves and community hunting areas. Results show a dramatic decline of wildlife since the previous survey in 1985. In 20 years, large mammals’ numbers decreased by 65%, probably <br />because of poaching and diseases brought by illegal cattle transhumance. Elephant (Loxodonta africana) and Buffon kob (Kobus kob) populations showed the greatest decline (over 80% each), while buffalo (Syncerus caffer), roan antelope (Hippotragus equinus) and Giant Lord’s Derby Eland (Taurotragus derbianus) populations seem stable or increasing over these last 20 years. The analysis of the wildlife population distribution by status of the different types of protected areas (national parks, hunting areas) showed that individual encounter rates of elephant and buffalo were lower in national parks than in neighbouring hunting areas, while those for roan, giraffe (Giraffa camelopardalis) and Buffon kob were higher in the national parks. [less ▲]

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See detailDiet and food preference of the waterbuck (Kobus ellipsiprymnus defassa) in the Pendjari National Park, Benin
Kassa, Barthélemy; Libois, Roland ULg; Sinsin, Brice

in African Journal of Ecology (2008), 46(3), 303-310

This study investigated composition and selectivity in diet for waterbuck in the Pendjari National Park in northwestern Benin, through the use of micrographic analysis of faecal samples. Three plant ... [more ▼]

This study investigated composition and selectivity in diet for waterbuck in the Pendjari National Park in northwestern Benin, through the use of micrographic analysis of faecal samples. Three plant species (Panicum anabaptistum, Echinochloa stagnina and Andropogon gayanus) were regularly consumed all year round. Meanwhile, three other species (i.e., Hyparrhenia involucrata, Acroceras amplectens and Oryza barthii) are mostly found in its diet during the beginning of the rainy season. During the dry season, long life grasses (>40%) and tree forage (about 35%) were the most dominant life form in the diet. On the contrary at the beginning of the rainy season, annual species (> 50%) were dominant. In conclusion, the waterbuck has a grazer regime when plant species are abundant and a mixed diet during the dry season. Waterbuck’s food niche breath, defined by Hespenheide [Ecology and Evolution of communities. Harvard Univ. Press, 1975], was lower than 1, implying this antelope does not eat all food categories in a proportional way. Shannon diversity index showed that the diet was more diversified during the rainy season and less diversified at the end of the dry season. Based on [Ecology, 64 (1983), 1297] diet selectivity index, waterbuck exerted a positive selection on the major graminaceous species. [less ▲]

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