References of "Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology"
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See detailPepLook: An innovative in silico tool for determination of structure, polymorphism and stability of peptides
Thomas, Annick ULg; Deshayes, Sebastien; Decaffmeyer, Marc et al

in Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology (2009), 611

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See detailThe early eukaryotic fossa record
Javaux, Emmanuelle ULg

in Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology (2007), 607

The Precambrian era records the evolution of the domain Eucarya. Although the taxonomy of fossils is often impossible to resolve beyond the level of domain, their morphology and chemistry indicate the ... [more ▼]

The Precambrian era records the evolution of the domain Eucarya. Although the taxonomy of fossils is often impossible to resolve beyond the level of domain, their morphology and chemistry indicate the evolution of major biological innovations. The late Archean record for eukaryotes is limited to trace amounts of biomarkers. Morphological evidence appears in late Paleoproterozoic and early Mesoproterozoic (1800-1300 Ma) rocks. The moderate diversity of preservable eukaryotic organisms includes cell walls without surface ornament (but with complex ultrastructure), with regularly distributed surface ornamentation, and with irregularly or regularly arranged processes. Collectively, these fossils suggest that eukaryotes with flexible membranes and cytoskeletons existed in mid-Proterozoic oceans. The late Mesoproterozoic-early Neoproterozoic (1300-750 Ma) is a time of diversification and evolution when direct evidence for important biological innovations occurs in the fossil record such as multicellularity, sex, photosynthesis, biomineralization, predation, and heterotrophy. Members of extant clades can be recognized and include bangiophyte red algae, xanthophyte algae, cladophorale green algae, euglyphid, lobose, and filose amoebae and possible fungi. In the late Neoproterozoic, besides more diversification of ornamented fossils, florideophyte red algae and brown algae diversify, and animals take the stage. The record of biological innovations documented by the fossils shows that eukaryotes had evolved most cytological and molecular complexities very early in the Proterozoic but environmental conditions delayed their diversification within clades until oxygen level and predation pressure increased significantly. [less ▲]

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See detailThe Locus for Enterocyte Effacement (Lee) of Enteropathogenic Escherichia Coli (Epec) from Dogs and Cats
Goffaux, F.; China, B.; Janssen, L. et al

in Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology (1999), 473

Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) produce attaching and effacing lesions. The genes responsible for this lesion are clustered on the chromosome forming a 35.5 kilobase pathogenesis island called ... [more ▼]

Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) produce attaching and effacing lesions. The genes responsible for this lesion are clustered on the chromosome forming a 35.5 kilobase pathogenesis island called LEE. The LEE was identified, characterized and completely sequenced from the human EPEC strain E2348/69. The LEE carries genes coding for: a type III secretion system (genes esc and sep), the translocated intimin receptor (gene tir), the outer membrane protein intimin (gene eae) and the E. coli secreted proteins EspA, EspB, and EspD (genes esp). In addition to man and farm animals, EPEC are also isolated from dogs and cats. We studied structurally and functionally the LEE of dog and cat EPEC. First, we used four probes scattered along the LEE to identify the presence of a LEE in canine and feline EPEC isolates. Second, by PCR, we checked the presence of genes homologous to eae, sep, esp, and tir genes in these strains. Third, since the four types of eae and tir genes were described, we developed a multiplex PCR in order to determine the type of eae and tir genes present in each strain. Fourth, we determined by PCR the site of the LEE insertion on the chromosome. Fifth, we tested several of the canine EPEC in their capacity to induce attaching and effacing lesions in the rabbit intestinal loop assay. We can conclude from this study: first, that the a LEE-like structure is present in all tested strains and that it contains genes homologous to esp, sep, tir, and eae genes; second, that there is some preferential associations between the type of eae gene and the type of tir gene present in a strain; third, that the majority of the tested strains contained a LEE located elsewhere on the chromosome in comparison to the human EPEC strain E2348/69; and fourth that dog EPEC were able to induce attaching and effacing lesions in rabbit ileal loop assay. [less ▲]

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See detailReproduction of Lesions and Clinical Signs with a Cnf2-Producing Escherichia Coli in Neonatal Calves
Van Bost, S.; Mainil, Jacques ULg

in Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology (1999), 473

CNF2-producing necrotoxigenic E. coli (NTEC2) are associated with diarrhoea and septicaemia in calves. We orally inoculated neonatal calves with a NTEC2 strain in order to reproduce clinical signs and ... [more ▼]

CNF2-producing necrotoxigenic E. coli (NTEC2) are associated with diarrhoea and septicaemia in calves. We orally inoculated neonatal calves with a NTEC2 strain in order to reproduce clinical signs and lesions. We observed diarrhoea in each inoculated calf, bacteraemia (80%), the presence of CNF2+ bacteria in the lungs (80%) and in the liver (20%). The observed lesions were inflammation of the entire gut, hypertrophy of the mesenteric lymph nodes and hepatisation of the lungs. We were unable to detect characteristic lesions that are classical signs of septicaemia. [less ▲]

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See detailPhosphorylation of Proteins Induced in a Murine Pre-T Cell Line by Neurohypophysial Peptides
Martens, Henri ULg; Kecha, O.; Charlet-Renard, C. et al

in Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology (1998), 449

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See detailHsv-1 Thymidine Kinase Gene Therapy for Peritoneal Carcinomatosis
Lechanteur, Chantal ULg; Princen, Frédéric; Lo Bue, S. et al

in Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology (1998), 451

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See detailExtracellular enveloped vaccinia virus. Entry, egress, and evasion
Smith, G. L.; Vanderplasschen, Alain ULg

in Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology (1998), 440

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See detailGlycoproteins of the aspartyl proteinase gene family secreted by the developing placenta
Roberts, R. M.; Xie, S.; Nagel, R. J. et al

in Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology (1995)

Pregnancy in cattle and sheep can be diagnosed by the presence of placentally-derived antigens (pregnancy-associated glycoproteins or PAG-1) in maternal serum soon after implantation begins at about Day ... [more ▼]

Pregnancy in cattle and sheep can be diagnosed by the presence of placentally-derived antigens (pregnancy-associated glycoproteins or PAG-1) in maternal serum soon after implantation begins at about Day 20 following conception. Molecular cloning of their cDNA has revealed that PAG-1 belong to the aspartic proteinase gene family and have about 50% amino acid sequence identity to pepsin. However, critical amino acid substitutions at the active site regions suggest that both bovine and ovine PAG-1 are enzymatically inactive. PAG-1 expression has been shown by in situ hybridization and immunocytochemistry to be localized to the trophoblast binucleate cells, which invade maternal uterine endometrium during implantation. The glycoproteins are concentrated in dense cytoplasmic granules that are discharged after the binucleate cells have migrated to the maternal side of the placental barrier. We suggest, therefore, that the PAG-1 might have an endocrine function either as carriers of other bioactive peptides or by acting as hormones themselves. Recently screening of placental libraries with nucleic acid probes has identified additional cDNA that are very abundant and code for polypeptides (PAG-2 and PAG-3) related to, but antigenically and structurally distinct from PAG-1 described above. These molecules have sequences of amino acids at their catalytic centers that are consistent with their being potentially functional proteinases but their role during pregnancy, like that of PAG-1, is unclear. [less ▲]

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See detailModulation of B lymphocyte proliferation inside the germinal center.
Bosseloir, A. L.; Defrance, T.; Bouzahzah, F. et al

in Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology (1995), 378

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See detailGerminal Center T Cells: Analysis of Their Proliferative Capacity
Bouzahzah, F.; Bosseloir, A.; Heinen, Ernst ULg et al

in Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology (1995), 378

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See detailAdhesion and costimulatory molecules on human FDC in vitro.
Tsunoda, R.; Heinen, Ernst ULg; Imai, Y. et al

in Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology (1995), 378

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See detailAnalysis by in Situ Hybridization of Cytokine Mrnas Expression in Thymic Nurse Cells
Deman, J.; Humblet, Chantal ULg; Martin, M. T. et al

in Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology (1994), 355

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See detailLymphocyte Lifespan in Murine Retrovirus-Induced Immunodeficiency
Moutschen, Michel ULg; Colombi, S.; Deprez, Manuel ULg et al

in Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology (1994), 355

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See detailTnf-Alpha Is Involved in the Mechanism of Murine Thymic Lymphoma Prevention by Bone Marrow Grafting
Humblet, Chantal ULg; Deman, J.; Rongy, A. M. et al

in Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology (1994), 355

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See detailExpression and function of DRC-1 antigen.
Bosseloir, A. L.; Antoine, Nadine ULg; Heinen, Ernst ULg et al

in Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology (1994), 355

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See detailPlace of MALT in the immune defence system.
Heinen, Ernst ULg

in Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology (1994), 355

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See detailRapid and Selective Isolation of Follicular Dendritic Cells by Low Speed Centrifugations on Discontinuous Bsa Gradients
Marcoty, C.; Heinen, Ernst ULg; Antoine, Nadine ULg et al

in Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology (1993), 329

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See detailFollicular dendritic cells: isolation procedures, short and long term cultures.
Heinen, Ernst ULg; Tsunoda, R.; Marcoty, C. et al

in Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology (1993), 329

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See detailDRC1 expression on normal and pathological lymphoid cells.
Antoine, Nadine ULg; Heinen, Ernst ULg; Marcoty, C. et al

in Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology (1993), 329

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See detailFollicular Dendritic Cells Do Not Produce Tnf-Alpha nor its Receptor
Mancini, I.; Bosseloir, A.; Hooghe-Peters, E. et al

in Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology (1993), 329

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