References of "Radiotherapy & Oncology"
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See detailA new technique of stereotactic permanent breast seed implantation
Jansen, Nicolas ULg; Nickers, Philippe ULg

in Radiotherapy & Oncology (2006, October), 81(Suppl. 1), 249-250

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See detail192ir Low Dose Rate Brachytherapy for Boosting Locally Advanced Prostate Cancers after External Beam Radiotherapy: A Phase Ii Trial
Nickers, Philippe ULg; Coppens, Luc ULg; De Leval, Jean ULg et al

in Radiotherapy & Oncology (2006), 79(3), 329-34

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: To evaluate on 201 locally advanced prostatic cancers prospectively treated in a phase II trial, the efficacy of a combination of external beam radiotherapy (39.6 Gy) and (192)Ir ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: To evaluate on 201 locally advanced prostatic cancers prospectively treated in a phase II trial, the efficacy of a combination of external beam radiotherapy (39.6 Gy) and (192)Ir low dose rate brachytherapy (Bt) (40-45 Gy). PATIENTS AND METHODS: Sixty-four patients were included in the intermediate prognosis group with only one of the following adverse factors (PSA > 10 ng/ml, Gleason score > or = 7 or clinical stage > or =T2b) and 137 in the unfavourable group when at least two of these factors were present. RESULTS: The actuarial 4 years biochemical no evidence of disease is 82.8% for the entire population. It is, respectively, 97 and 76% in the intermediate and unfavourable prognosis groups (P < 0.0001). Grade > or =3 late urinary complications occurred in 13 patients (6.5%). Eight patients (4%) presented late grade 2 rectal complications but no grades 3-5 was observed. CONCLUSIONS: Even if an alpha/beta of 1.5-3 Gy theoretically favours the use of a high dose rate mode of irradiation, the early results presented here are as good as those reported for similar groups of patients with high dose rate treatments. Late toxicity is identical but our urinary toxicity is within the less favourable and rectal toxicity within the most favourable results. We can postulate that while inducing very high hyperdosage regions (V150) mainly focused on the peripheral zone, most of the Bt techniques consist of a more ablative treatment. Many of the radiobiological studies on Bt did not in fact take into account the heterogeneity of irradiation inside the CTV. This study highlights the need to explore pulsed dose rate therapies, permanent implant and new available radioisotopes such as (169)Ytterbium that will offer the safety of low and lower dose rates. The actual late toxicity of the different Bt techniques is not yet inexistent indeed. [less ▲]

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See detailPréoperative hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy (HART) in locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC) immediately followed by surgery. A prospective trial.
Coucke, Philippe ULg; Notter, M; Matter, M et al

in Radiotherapy & Oncology (2006), 79

Abstract Background and purpose: We aim to report on local control in a phase II trial on preoperative hyperfractionated and accelerated radiotherapy schedule (HART) in locally advanced resectable rectal ... [more ▼]

Abstract Background and purpose: We aim to report on local control in a phase II trial on preoperative hyperfractionated and accelerated radiotherapy schedule (HART) in locally advanced resectable rectal cancer (LARC). This fractionation schedule was designed to keep the overall treatment time (OTT) as short as possible. Patients and methods: This is a prospective trial on patients with UICC stages II and III rectal cancer. The patients were submitted to a total dose of 41.6 Gy, delivered in 2.5 weeks at 1.6 Gy per fraction twice a day with a 6-h interfraction interval. Surgery was performed within 1 week after the end of irradiation. Adjuvant chemotherapy was delivered in a subset of patients. Results: Two hundred and seventy nine patients were entered and 250 are fully assessable, with a median follow-up of 39 months. The 5-years actuarial local control (LC) rate is 91.7%. The overall survival (OS) is 59.6%. The freedom from disease relapse (FDR) is 71.5%. Downstaging was observed in 38% of the tumors. Conclusion: The actuarial LC at 5 years is 91.7%, although we are dealing with stages II–III LARC, mainly located in the lower rectum (median distanceZ5 cm). The pattern of failure is dominated by distant metastases and treatment intensification will obviously require a systemic approach. q 2006 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved. Radiotherapy and Oncology 79 (2006) 52–58. [less ▲]

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See detail192-Ir or 125-I Prostate Brachytherapy as a Boost to External Beam Radiotherapy in Locally Advanced Prostatic Cancer: A Dosimetric Point of View
Nickers, Philippe ULg; Thissen, Benedicte ULg; Jansen, Nicolas ULg et al

in Radiotherapy & Oncology (2006), 78(1), 47-52

PURPOSE: This work aims at comparing the dosimetric possibilities of 125I or 192Ir prostate brachytherapy (Bt) as a boost to external beam radiotherapy in the treatment of locally advanced adenocarcinoma ... [more ▼]

PURPOSE: This work aims at comparing the dosimetric possibilities of 125I or 192Ir prostate brachytherapy (Bt) as a boost to external beam radiotherapy in the treatment of locally advanced adenocarcinoma. METHODS AND MATERIALS: From 1/1997 to 12/2002, 260 patients were treated. Until 12/2001 a low dose rate (LDR) treatment with 192Ir wires was used, later replaced by a high dose rate (HDR) delivered with an 192Ir stepping source technology. For the present work, we selected 40 patients including the last 20 treated, respectively, by LDR and HDR. The planning CT Scans of all these 40 patients were transferred into the 3D Prowess system for 125I permanent implants design according to the Seattle method. The reference data for dosimetric comparisons were the V100 and the prescribed dose for 192Ir as well as the dose delivered with 125I techniques to the 192Ir V100. We compared V100-150 data as well as doses to the organs at risks (OR) and cold spots (CS). RESULTS: The V100 is 85.3+/-8% for 192Ir LDR and 96+/-2% for HDR techniques (P < 0.0001). In comparison with 125I, the 192Ir LDR mode induces higher hyperdosage volumes inside the CTV but also more CS, while maximal doses to urethra and rectum are, respectively, 17 and 39% less with 125I (P < 0.0001). In comparison with the 192Ir HDR mode, 125I Bt induces higher hyperdosage volumes and slightly more CS deliberately planned around the bladder neck. If delivered doses to urethra are identical, those to the 20% anterior part of the rectum are 33% less with 125I (P < 0,0001). The 125I Bt technique was only possible in 24 out of the 40 patients studied due to pelvic bone arch interference. CONCLUSIONS: At the present time, there is no evident dosimetric superiority of one Bt method when all the criteria are taken into account. However, improving Bt techniques to implant any prostatic size could found the superiority of the 125I or permanent implants. 125I indeed allows large hyperdosage volumes inside the CTV in comparison with 192Ir HDR techniques while lowering doses to OR and minimizing CS. [less ▲]

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See detailNeoadjuvant Radiochemotherapy of Locally/Regionally Advanced Rectal Cancer is a standard treatment option
Farkas, Róbert; Al-Farhat, Yousuf; GULYBAN, Akos ULg et al

in Radiotherapy & Oncology (2006), 81(suppl1), 237

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See detailMultisegmented tangential breast fields: an effective step towards IMRT without a significantly higher secondary cancer risk
GULYBAN, Akos ULg; Kovács, Péter; Bellyei, Szabolcs et al

in Radiotherapy & Oncology (2006), 81(suppl 1), 172

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See detailInterim Report on clinical testing of a comprehensive solution for patient positioning and immobilization for high tech RT
Hideghéty, Katalin; Kahan, Zsuzsa; Thurzo, Laszlo et al

in Radiotherapy & Oncology (2006), 81(supplement 1), 434

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See detailRadiochemothreapy for stage III pancreatic cancer
Al-Farhat, Yousuf; Kovács, Péter; GULYBAN, Akos ULg et al

in Radiotherapy & Oncology (2006), 81(suppl1), 303

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See detailPreoperative hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy (HART) in locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC) immediately followed by surgery. A prospective phase II trial
Coucke, Philippe ULg; Notter; Stamm et al

in Radiotherapy & Oncology (2005)

Background and purpose We aim to report on local control in a phase II trial on preoperative hyperfractionated and accelerated radiotherapy schedule (HART) in locally advanced resectable rectal cancer ... [more ▼]

Background and purpose We aim to report on local control in a phase II trial on preoperative hyperfractionated and accelerated radiotherapy schedule (HART) in locally advanced resectable rectal cancer (LARC). This fractionation schedule was designed to keep the overall treatment time (OTT) as short as possible. Patients and methods This is a prospective trial on patients with UICC stages II and III rectal cancer. The patients were submitted to a total dose of 41.6 Gy, delivered in 2.5 weeks at 1.6 Gy per fraction twice a day with a 6-h interfraction interval. Surgery was performed within 1 week after the end of irradiation. Adjuvant chemotherapy was delivered in a subset of patients. Results Two hundred and seventy nine patients were entered and 250 are fully assessable, with a median follow-up of 39 months. The 5-years actuarial local control (LC) rate is 91.7%. The overall survival (OS) is 59.6%. The freedom from disease relapse (FDR) is 71.5%. Downstaging was observed in 38% of the tumors. Conclusion The actuarial LC at 5 years is 91.7%, although we are dealing with stages II–III LARC, mainly located in the lower rectum (median distance=5 cm). The pattern of failure is dominated by distant metastases and treatment intensification will obviously require a systemic approach. [less ▲]

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See detailAccelerated postoperative radiation therapy with weekly concomitant boost in high risk patients with squamous-cell carcinoma of the head and neck
Chevalier; Pasche; COUCKE, Philippe ULg et al

in Radiotherapy & Oncology (2002), 64(supp 1), 248

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See detailDecreased local control following radiation therapy alone in early larynx cancer with anterior commisure extension
Ozsahin; Bron; COUCKE, Philippe ULg et al

in Radiotherapy & Oncology (2002), 64(supp 1), 243-244

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See detail33 RENO: A European surveillance registry of coronary brachytherapy with the NovosteTM Beta-CathTM System
Coen, V.; Sauerwein; Orrechia et al

in Radiotherapy & Oncology (2001), 60(supp 1), 12

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See detailA survey on staging and treatment in uterine cervical carcinoma in the Radiotherapy Cooperative Group of the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer
Coucke, Philippe ULg; Maingon, P; Ciernik, I et al

in Radiotherapy & Oncology (2000), 54

Abstract Background: The treatment outcome of advanced stage uterine cervical carcinoma remains unsatisfactory. In order to elaborate a novel trial within The Radiotherapy Cooperative Group (RCG) of the ... [more ▼]

Abstract Background: The treatment outcome of advanced stage uterine cervical carcinoma remains unsatisfactory. In order to elaborate a novel trial within The Radiotherapy Cooperative Group (RCG) of the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC), we conducted a survey in 1997±1998 to determine the variability of pre-treatment assessment and treatment options. The variability of choosing surgery, de®ned radiation therapy techniques and chemotherapy are investigated, as well as the center's choices of future treatment strategies. Methods: Fifty two of 81 RCG centers from the RCG have participated in the survey. As one would expect, there is a large variation in the techniques used for pretreatment evaluation and treatment options. There is no `standard' for reporting acute and late side effects. Chemotherapy is used neither systematically nor uniformly, and some centers continue to use neadjuvant chemotherapy modalities. Results: Furthermore, the survey reveals that there is a strong demand for the reduction of overall treatment-time, for clinical investigation of novel combined modality treatment strategies, especially chemo±radiation therapy, and also for the use of new radiation sensitizers. Conclusion:We conclude that a more homogeneous approach to the pretreatment evaluation as well as treatment techniques is required in order to allow adequate quality control in any future trial of the RCG in the EORTC.q2000 Elsevier Science Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailEvaluation of frequency and type of errors detected by a computerized record and verify system during radiation treatment
Barthelemy, Nicole ULg; Sabatier, Jacques; Dewé, Walthère ULg et al

in Radiotherapy & Oncology (1999), 53(2), 149-54

Background: Computerized record and verify systems (RVS) have been introduced to improve the precision of radiation treatment delivery. These systems prevent the delivery of ionizing radiations when the ... [more ▼]

Background: Computerized record and verify systems (RVS) have been introduced to improve the precision of radiation treatment delivery. These systems prevent the delivery of ionizing radiations when the settings of the treatment machine do not match the intended parameters within some maximal authorized deviation. Purpose: To assess the potential alteration of the frequency of errors associated with the use of RVS during radiation treatment delivery. Materials and methods: The software of the RVS was altered in order to record the settings actually used for radiation treatment delivery whereas the verification function was suppressed. At the end of the study period, the settings used during daily administration of radiation treatment were compared to the parameters recorded in the RVS using the computer. They were also compared with the planned ones written in the patient treatment chart. Results: Out of the 147 476 parameters examined during the study period, 678 (0.46%) were set erroneously. At least one error occurred in 628 (3.22%) of the 19 512 treated fields. An erroneous parameter was introduced in the RVS memory in 22 (1.17%) of the 1885 fields. Conclusions: RVS has the potential to improve precision of radiation treatment delivery by detecting a significant number of setting errors. However, excessive confidence in RVS could lead to repeated errors as there is a potential for the entry of erroneous parameters into the RVS memory. [less ▲]

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See detailA treatment planning intercomparison of proton and intensity modulated photon radiotherapy.
Lomax, T; Goitein, G; Debus, J et al

in Radiotherapy & Oncology (1999), 51(3)

Abstract Purpose: A comparative treatment planning study has been undertaken between standard photon delivery techniques,b intensity modulated photon methods and spot scanned protons in order to ... [more ▼]

Abstract Purpose: A comparative treatment planning study has been undertaken between standard photon delivery techniques,b intensity modulated photon methods and spot scanned protons in order to investigate the merits and limitations of each of these treatment approaches. Methods: Plans for each modality were performed using CT scans and planning information for nine patients with varying indications and lesion sites and the results have been analysed using a variety of dose and volume based parameters. Results: Over all cases, it is predicted that the use of protons could lead to a reduction of the total integral dose by a factor three compared to standard photon techniques and a factor two compared to IM photon plans. In addition, in all but one Organ at Risk (OAR) for one case, protons are predicted to reduce both mean OAR dose and the irradiated volume at the 50% mean target dose level compared to both photon methods. However, when considering the volume of an OAR irradiated to 70% or more of the target dose, little difference could be shown between proton and intensity modulated photon plans. On comparing the magnitude of dose hot spots in OARs resulting from the proton and IM photon plans, more variation was observed, and the ranking of the plans was then found to be case and OAR dependent. Conclusions: The use of protons has been found to reduce the medium to low dose load (below about 70% of the target dose) to OARs and all non-target tissues compared to both standard and inversely planned photons, but that the use of intensity modulated photons can result in similar levels of high dose conformation to that afforded by protons. However, the introduction of inverse planning methods for protons is necessary before general conclusions on the relative efficacy of photons and protons can be drawn. [less ▲]

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See detailThe value of pretreatment cell kinetic parameters as predictors for radiotherapy outcome in head and neck cancer : a multicenter analysis.
Begg, A-C; Hart, AAM; Dische, S et al

in Radiotherapy & Oncology (1999), 50

Purpose: The aim of this study was to assess the potential of pre-treatment cell kinetic parameters to predict outcome in head and neck cancer patients treated by conventional radiotherapy. Materials and ... [more ▼]

Purpose: The aim of this study was to assess the potential of pre-treatment cell kinetic parameters to predict outcome in head and neck cancer patients treated by conventional radiotherapy. Materials and methods: Data from 11 different centers were pooled. Inclusion criteria were such that the patients received radiotherapy alone, and that the radiotherapy was given in an overall time of at least 6 weeks with a dose of at least 60 Gy. All patients received a tracer dose of either iododeoxyuridine (IdUrd) or bromodeoxyuridine (BrdUrd) intravenously prior to treatment and a tumor biopsy was taken several hours later. The cell kinetic parameters labeling index (LI), DNA synthesis time (Ts) and potential doubling time (Tpot) were subsequently calculated from flow cytometry data, obtained on the biopsies using antibodies against I/BrdUrd incorporated into DNA. Each center carried out their own flow cytometry analysis. Results: From the 11 centers, a total of 476 patients conforming to the inclusion criteria were analyzed. Median values for overall time and total dose were 49 days and 69 Gy, respectively. Fifty one percent of patients had local recurrences and 53% patients had died, the majority from their disease. Median follow-up was 20 months; being 30 months for surviving patients. Multivariate analysis revealed that T-stage, maximum tumor diameter, differentiation grade, N-stage, tumor localization and overall time correlated with locoregional control, in decreasing order of significance. For the cell kinetic parameters, univariate analysis showed that only LI was significantly associated with local control (P=0.02), with higher values correlating with a worse outcome. Ts showed some evidence that patients with longer values did worse, but this was not significant (P=0.06). Tpot showed no trend (P=0.8). When assessing survival in a univariate analysis, neither LI nor Tpot associated with outcome (P=0.4, 0.4, respectively). Surprisingly, Ts did correlate with survival, with longer values being worse (P=0.02). In the multivariate analysis of local control, LI lost its significance (P=0.16). Conclusions: The only pretreatment kinetic parameter for which some evidence was found for an association with local control (the best end-point for testing the present hypothesis) was LI, not Tpot, and this evidence disappeared in a multivariate analysis. It therefore appears that pretreatment cell kinetic measurements carried out using flow cytometry, only provide a relatively weak predictor of outcome after radiotherapy in head and neck cancer. [less ▲]

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See detailFocalized external radiotherapy for resected solitary brain metastasis: does the dogma stand?
Coucke, Philippe ULg; Zouhair, Abderrahim; Ozsahin, Mahmut et al

in Radiotherapy & Oncology (1998), 47(1), 99-101

To investigate whether whole brain irradiation might be replaced by focalized irradiation after resection of a single brain metastasis in patients where extracranial tumor control is deemed to be obtained ... [more ▼]

To investigate whether whole brain irradiation might be replaced by focalized irradiation after resection of a single brain metastasis in patients where extracranial tumor control is deemed to be obtained. Patients and methods: Twelve patients were introduced in a phase I/II prospective study of conformal postoperative external irradiation after resection of a solitary brain metastasis. The radiation treatment consisted of 50.4 Gy (1.8 Gy per fraction, five fractions per week). The planning target volume consisted of the tumor bed and a 2 cm safety margin. All treatments were optimized with head immobilization, dedicated tomodensitometry and computer assisted three-dimensional treatment planning. Results: The median survival was 7.2 months (range 2.4–50.4 months). Eleven of the 12 patients died. Eight of the 12 patients presented intracranial recurrence and seven died as a consequence of intracranial tumor progression. Conclusions: Focalized external irradiation cannot serve as a reasonable alternative to whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT) even for patients with apparently one single resected brain metastasis. The dogma of ‘one metastasis=multiple metastases' seems to be confirmed. [less ▲]

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See detailradiosensitizers FMdC and idUrd: HPLC-analysis in vitro
COUCKE, Philippe ULg; Cottin, E; Chen, X et al

in Radiotherapy & Oncology (1998), 48(Supp 1),

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