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See detailBiologically active bisbenzylisoquinoline alkaloids from the root bark of Epinetrum villosum
Otshudi, A. L.; Apers, S.; Pieters, L. et al

in Journal of Ethnopharmacology (2005), 102(1), 89-94

Methanol and water extracts of the root of Epinetrum villosum (Exell) Troupin (Menispermaceae) were found to exhibit antimicrobial and antiplasmodial activities. Investigation of the active methanol ... [more ▼]

Methanol and water extracts of the root of Epinetrum villosum (Exell) Troupin (Menispermaceae) were found to exhibit antimicrobial and antiplasmodial activities. Investigation of the active methanol fraction led to the isolation of four bisbenzylisoquinoline alkaloids, i.e., cycleanine, cycleanine N-oxide, isochondodendrine and cocsoline. Structures were established by spectroscopic methods. Cocsoline displayed antibacterial and antifungal activities (MIC values of 1000-15.62 and 31.25 mu g/ml, respectively). Isochondodendrine was found to have the most potent antiplasmodial activity (IC50 = 0- 10 mu g/ml), whereas the IC50 on HCT-116 human colon carcinoma cells was 17.5 mu g/ml (selectivity index 175). Cycleanine acted against HIV-2 (EC50 = 1.83 mu g/ml) but was at least 10-fold less active against HIV-1. Cycleanine N-oxide showed no activity towards all tested microorganisms. (C) 2005 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailRecent developments in the field of arrow and dart poisons
Philippe, Geneviève ULg; Angenot, Luc ULg

in Journal of Ethnopharmacology (2005), 100(1-2), 85-91

Arrow and dart poisons, considered as conventional natural sources for future drug discovery, have already provided numerous biologically active molecules used as drugs in therapeutic applications or in ... [more ▼]

Arrow and dart poisons, considered as conventional natural sources for future drug discovery, have already provided numerous biologically active molecules used as drugs in therapeutic applications or in pharmacological research. Plants containing alkaloids or cardiotonic glycosides have generally been the main ingredients responsible for the efficacy of these poisons, although some animals, such as frogs, have also been employed. This paper, without being exhaustive, reports the greater strides made during the past 15 years in the understanding of the chemical nature and biological properties of arrow and dart poison constituents. Examples both of promising biological properties shown by these molecules and of crucial discoveries achieved by their use as pharmacological tools are given. Further studies of these toxic principles are likely to enable scientists to find new valuable lead compounds, useful in many fields of research, like oncology, inflammation and infectious diseases. 2005 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailIn vitro screening of some Strychnos species for antiplasmodial activity
Philippe, Geneviève ULg; Angenot, Luc ULg; De Mol, Patrick ULg et al

in Journal of Ethnopharmacology (2005), 97(3), 535-539

The antiplasmodial activity of crude extracts of 19 species of Strychnos (Loganiaceae) was assessed in vitro against a chloroquine-susceptible strain of Plasmodium falciparum. For each species, ethyl ... [more ▼]

The antiplasmodial activity of crude extracts of 19 species of Strychnos (Loganiaceae) was assessed in vitro against a chloroquine-susceptible strain of Plasmodium falciparum. For each species, ethyl acetate (EtOAc) extracts were analysed and, for the most active species, methanolic (MeOH) extracts were also tested. Among them, Strychnos variabilis De Wild. seemed to be very promising (inhibitory concentration 50% (IC50) < 5 microg/ml) whereas two other species, Strychnos gossweileri Exell and Strychnos mellodora S. Moore, could be interesting (IC50 < 15 microg/ml) in further antimalarial studies. [less ▲]

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See detailIsolation and pharmacological activity of phenylpropanoid esters from Marrubium vulgare
Sahpaz, S.; Garbacki, Nancy ULg; Tits, Monique ULg et al

in Journal of Ethnopharmacology (2002), 79(3), 389-392

The isolation and identification of major phenylpropanoid esters from Marrubium vulgare: (+) (E)-caffeoyl-L-malic acid 1, acteoside 2, forsythoside B 3, arenarioside 4, ballotetroside 5, as well as their ... [more ▼]

The isolation and identification of major phenylpropanoid esters from Marrubium vulgare: (+) (E)-caffeoyl-L-malic acid 1, acteoside 2, forsythoside B 3, arenarioside 4, ballotetroside 5, as well as their anti-inflammatory activity are reported for the first time, We evaluated the inhibitory effects of these five compounds on cyclooxygenase (Cox) catalysed prostaglandin biosynthesis activity. Only the glycosidic phenylpropanoid esters showed an inhibitory activity towards the Cox-2 enzyme and three of them: acteoside 2, forsythoside B 3, arenarioside 4, exhibited higher inhibitory potencies on Cox-2 than on Cox-1. These results are of interest, as Cox-2 is mainly associated with inflammation and the Cox-1 inhibition with adverse side effects often observed with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. The occurence of these phenylpropanoid esters could also explain some other pharmacological properties of M. vulgare. (C) 2002 Elsevier Science Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailAnti-Inflammatory and Immunological Effects of Centaurea Cyanus Flower-Heads
Garbacki, Nancy ULg; Gloaguen, Vincent; Damas, Jacques ULg et al

in Journal of Ethnopharmacology (1999), 68(1-3), 235-41

Centaurea cyanus flower-heads are used in European phytotherapy for the treatment of minor ocular inflammations. Different pharmacological experiments (inhibition of carrageenan, zymosan and croton oil ... [more ▼]

Centaurea cyanus flower-heads are used in European phytotherapy for the treatment of minor ocular inflammations. Different pharmacological experiments (inhibition of carrageenan, zymosan and croton oil-induced oedemas, inhibition of plasma haemolytic activity, induction of anaphylatoxin activity) showed that polysaccharides extracted from C. cyanus flower-heads had anti-inflammatory properties and interfered with complement. Moreover, these polysaccharides were found to be mainly composed of galacturonic acid, arabinose, glucose, rhamnose and galactose. [less ▲]

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See detailFrom ethnobotanical uses of Strychnos henningsii to antiinflammatories, analgesics and antispasmodics
Tits, Monique ULg; Damas, Jacques ULg; Quetin-Leclercq, Joëlle et al

in Journal of Ethnopharmacology (1991), 34

Strychnos henningsii GILG is used in African traditional medicine for the treatment of various ailments, including rheumatism, gastrointestinal complaints, malaria and snake bites. Different preliminary ... [more ▼]

Strychnos henningsii GILG is used in African traditional medicine for the treatment of various ailments, including rheumatism, gastrointestinal complaints, malaria and snake bites. Different preliminary pharmacological experiments are described. The results show that some of the reported folk medicinal applications of S. henningsii can be at least partially explained by the presence of retuline-like alkaloids, whose use could lead to new antinociceptive (antiinflammatory and analgesic) and antispasmodic drugs. [less ▲]

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See detailSouth American Strychnos Species. Ethnobotany (except Curare) and Alkaloid Screening
Quetin-Leclercq, J.; Angenot, Luc ULg; Bisset, N. G.

in Journal of Ethnopharmacology (1990), 28(1), 1-52

The ethnobotanical uses of South American species of Strychnos L. (Loganiaceae) are reviewed, with the exception of their major role in the preparation of curare, which will be dealt with in detail ... [more ▼]

The ethnobotanical uses of South American species of Strychnos L. (Loganiaceae) are reviewed, with the exception of their major role in the preparation of curare, which will be dealt with in detail elsewhere. Medicinal uses are less common than is the case with the African and Asian species of the genus. About 140 samples, mostly of leaves, belonging to 53 species, have been screened for alkaloids. As with species from other parts of the world, the stem bark and root bark tend to be a richer source than leaves. Nor-harman is present in extracts from S. barnhartiana leaves. Pyridino-indolo-quinolizidinone (angustine-type) bases are also found in several species. The occurrence and pharmacology of the (non-curarizing) alkaloids known to be present in South American Strychnos species is reviewed. [less ▲]

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See detailScreening of cytotoxic activities of Strychnos alkaloids ( methods and results)
Leclercq, Joëlle; De Pauw-Gillet, Marie-Claire ULg; Bassleer, Roger et al

in Journal of Ethnopharmacology (1986), 15

The potential cytotoxic activities of 46 alkaloids isolated from different Strychnos species were tested on different cancer or normal cells cultured in vitro. The authors use a relatively simple ... [more ▼]

The potential cytotoxic activities of 46 alkaloids isolated from different Strychnos species were tested on different cancer or normal cells cultured in vitro. The authors use a relatively simple microtest which gives good reproducibility. Most of the active compounds belong to the usambarane skeleton but other structure-activity relationships are being discussed. [less ▲]

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See detailAntimitotic activity of strychnopentamine, a bisindolic alkaloid
Tits, Monique ULg; Desaive, Claude ULg; Marnette, J. M. et al

in Journal of Ethnopharmacology (1984), 12

Strychnopentamine has been tested for its cytotoxicity and antitumor activities and compared with two other bisindolic alkaloids that possess an usambarane skeleton. The presence of a N-methylpyrrolidine ... [more ▼]

Strychnopentamine has been tested for its cytotoxicity and antitumor activities and compared with two other bisindolic alkaloids that possess an usambarane skeleton. The presence of a N-methylpyrrolidine group increases the antimitotic activity of this type of alkaloids. [less ▲]

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