References of "Diabetologia"
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See detailInsulin secretion, metabolism and sensitivity before and after a protein-sparing modified fast in obese subjects.
Paquot, Nicolas ULg; Scheen, André ULg; juchmes, Jacques et al

in Diabetologia (1990), 33(suppl), 216

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See detailSandostatin, a new analogue of somatostatin, reduces the metabolic changes induced by the nocturnal interruption of continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion in type 1 (insulin-dependent) diabetic patients.
Scheen, André ULg; Gillet, J.; Rosenthaler, J. et al

in Diabetologia (1989), 32(11), 801-9

With the aim of assessing a new somatostatin analogue to prevent the metabolic changes induced by a 6-h nocturnal arrest of an insulin pump, nine C-peptide negative Type 1 (insulin-dependent) diabetic ... [more ▼]

With the aim of assessing a new somatostatin analogue to prevent the metabolic changes induced by a 6-h nocturnal arrest of an insulin pump, nine C-peptide negative Type 1 (insulin-dependent) diabetic patients were submitted blindly to two interruptions (from 23.00 to 05.00 hours) of their continuous s.c. insulin infusion, once after a single s.c. injection at 23.00 hours of 50 micrograms SMS 201-995 (Sandostatin, Sandoz) and once after 0.9% NaCl. Plasma SMS 201-995 levels peaked at 24.00 hours and then declined with an elimination half-life averaging 144 +/- 15 min. Plasma glucagon and growth hormone levels were significantly reduced after SMS 201-995 whereas the progressive fall in plasma-free insulin levels from 23.00 to 05.00 hours was unaffected. In the control test, blood glucose levels tended to decrease slightly from 23.00 to 02.00 hours and then increased markedly from 02.00 to 05.00 hours (+5.3 +/- 1.5 mmol/l) while after SMS 201-995 they decreased significantly from 23.00 to 02.00 hours (-2.6 +/- 0.5 mmol/l), resulting in values below 3 mmol/l in seven subjects, but showed a secondary increase until 05.00 hours (+3.5 +/- 1.5 mmol vs 23.00 h; p less than 0.05 vs 0.9% NaCl). While the rises in plasma non-esterified fatty acid and glycerol levels were not reduced by SMS 201-995, the increase in plasma 3-hydroxbutyrate levels, although similar from 23.00 to 02.00 hours, was significantly reduced from 02.00 to 05.00 hours (+77 +/- 20 vs +124 +/- 31 mumols.l-1.h-1; p less than 0.05).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) [less ▲]

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See detailImpaired insulin-induced erythrocyte magnesium accumulation is correlated to impaired insulin-mediated glucose disposal in type 2 (non-insulin-dependent) diabetic patients.
Paolisso, G.; Sgambato, S.; Giugliano, D. et al

in Diabetologia (1988), 31(12), 910-5

Plasma and erythrocyte magnesium levels were measured by atomic absorption spectrometry in 12 healthy subjects and 12 moderately obese patients with Type 2 (non-insulin-dependent) diabetes mellitus. Basal ... [more ▼]

Plasma and erythrocyte magnesium levels were measured by atomic absorption spectrometry in 12 healthy subjects and 12 moderately obese patients with Type 2 (non-insulin-dependent) diabetes mellitus. Basal plasma and erythrocyte magnesium levels were significantly lower in diabetic patients than in control subjects. In vitro incubation in the presence of 100 mU/l insulin significantly increased magnesium erythrocyte levels in both control subjects (p less than 0.001) and patients with diabetes (p less than 0.001). However, even in the presence of 100 mU/l insulin, the erythrocyte magnesium content of patients with Type 2 diabetes was lower than that of control subjects. The in vitro dose-response curve of the effect of insulin on magnesium erythrocyte accumulation was shifted to the right when red cells of diabetic patients were used, with a highly significant reduction of the maximal effect. Such reduction of the maximal effect of insulin suggests that the impairment of insulin-induced erythrocyte magnesium accumulation observed in Type 2 diabetic patients results essentially from a post-receptor defect.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) [less ▲]

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See detailInsulin induces opposite changes in plasma and erythrocyte magnesium concentrations in normal man.
Paolisso, G.; Sgambato, S.; Passariello, N. et al

in Diabetologia (1986), 29(9), 644-7

Plasma and erythrocyte magnesium levels were measured by atomic absorption spectrophotometry in 10 healthy volunteers during an oral glucose tolerance test and during an euglycaemic hyperinsulinaemic ... [more ▼]

Plasma and erythrocyte magnesium levels were measured by atomic absorption spectrophotometry in 10 healthy volunteers during an oral glucose tolerance test and during an euglycaemic hyperinsulinaemic glucose clamp. At min 180 and 210 of the oral glucose tolerance test, a significant decline in plasma magnesium levels (p less than 0.01 and p less than 0.05 respectively) and a significant increase in erythrocyte magnesium levels (p less than 0.01 and p less than 0.05 respectively) were observed. Similar changes were seen during the second hour of the glucose clamp, during which euglycaemia (4.1 +/- 0.4 mmol/l) was maintained despite hyperinsulinaemia (110-130 mU/l). During in vitro incubations, glucose (5 mmol/l) did not modify erythrocyte magnesium levels. In contrast, erythrocyte magnesium levels were significantly increased (p less than 0.01) by insulin (100 mU/l), an effect entirely abolished by ouabain (5 X 10(-4) mol/l). These results suggest that insulin induces a shift of magnesium from the plasma to the erythrocytes both in vivo and in vitro. These data may help to interprete the abnormalities in magnesium circulating levels frequently reported in diabetic patients. [less ▲]

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See detailBlood collection while using a continuous glucose analyzer without insertion of an additional venous catheter.
Castillo, M. J.; Scheen, André ULg; Luyckx, A. S. et al

in Diabetologia (1983), 25(2), 120-2

A new method for continuous blood collection using the Biostator is described. Blood is withdrawn through the double lumen catheter by a tube installed in the optional channel of the infusion pump. The ... [more ▼]

A new method for continuous blood collection using the Biostator is described. Blood is withdrawn through the double lumen catheter by a tube installed in the optional channel of the infusion pump. The amount of blood withdrawn from the patient is slightly greater than that necessary for continuous glucose analysis; the excess blood can be collected into assay tubes. Blood collection is continuous and produces a sample of diluted heparinized blood. The volume of blood collected depends on the size of the tube used, i.e. for a tube with a lumen diameter of 0.020 inches, the mean (+/- SD) volume collected was 1.21 +/- 0.07 ml/10 min (n = 13). The mean time interval between sampling and arrival at the glucose sensor by the double lumen catheter was 119 versus 108 s with the conventional method. The proposed modification does not affect blood glucose measurements (correlation coefficient compared with the reference method r = 0.9572; n = 13). To compensate for blood dilution, a dilution-factor depending on tubing diameter has to be calculated in each experiment. [less ▲]

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See detailA 6-hour nocturnal interruption of a continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion: 1. Metabolic and hormonal consequences and scheme for a prompt return to adequate control.
Krzentowski, G.; Scheen, André ULg; Castillo, M. et al

in Diabetologia (1983), 24(5), 314-8

Interruption of a continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion, most often due to technical problems occurring during the night, is a not uncommon event whose metabolic consequences have received relatively ... [more ▼]

Interruption of a continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion, most often due to technical problems occurring during the night, is a not uncommon event whose metabolic consequences have received relatively little attention until now. We have therefore investigated the changes in blood glucose, plasma non-esterified fatty acids, 3-hydroxybutyrate, glucagon and free insulin in eight C-peptide negative Type 1 diabetic patients whose pumps were deliberately stopped between 23.00 h and 05.00 h. A control test with the pump functioning normally was carried out in each patient and the studies were randomized. Considering the values at 23.00 h as reference, interruption of the insulin infusion resulted in (1) a rapid decrease in plasma free insulin significant after 1 h and reaching a nadir of 6 +/- 2 mU/l after 6 h; (2) a rise in blood glucose which was significant at hour 3 and reached 17.4 +/- 1.9 mmol/l at hour 6; (3) a moderate increase in plasma nonesterified fatty acids which remained in the range of 700-800 mumol/l; (4) an early and linear rise in plasma 3-hydroxybutyrate, significant after 1 h and averaging 1290 +/- 140 mumol/l after 6 h; (5) a late increase (hour 5) in plasma glucagon. The second aim of our study was to provide for the patient a precise scheme of insulin supplements administered via the pump and based on blood glucose monitoring (Dextrostix - Glucometer) and semi-quantitative evaluation of ketonuria (Acetest). Resetting the pump at its basal rate at 05.00 h and giving insulin supplements (2-8 U) at 06.45 h (with the usual breakfast dose) and again at 10.00 h have proved efficacious in restoring satisfactory metabolic control by noon the day after starting the experiment. These results form practical recommendations to patients undergoing this type of accident. [less ▲]

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