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See detailBovine herpesvirus 4 induces apoptosis of human carcinoma cell lines in vitro and in vivo
Gillet, Laurent ULg; Dewals, Benjamin G ULg; Farnir, Frédéric ULg et al

in Cancer Research (2005), 65(20), 9463-9472

The idea of using oncolytic viruses for the treatment of cancers was proposed a century ago. During the last two decades, viruses able to replicate specifically in cancer cells and to induce their lysis ... [more ▼]

The idea of using oncolytic viruses for the treatment of cancers was proposed a century ago. During the last two decades, viruses able to replicate specifically in cancer cells and to induce their lysis were identified and were genetically modified to improve their viro-oncolytic properties. More recently, a new approach consisting of inducing selective apoptosis in cancer cells through viral infection has been proposed; this approach has been called viro-oncoapoptosis. In the present study, we report the property of bovine herpesvirus-4 (BoHV-4) to induce, in vitro and in vivo, apoptosis of some human carcinomas. This conclusion relies on the following observations: (a) In vitro, BoHV-4 infection induced apoptosis of A549 and OVCAR carcinoma cell lines in a time- and dose-dependent manner. (b) Apoptosis was induced by the expression of an immediate-early or an early BoHV-4 gene, but did not require viral replication. (c) Cell treatment with caspase inhibitors showed that apoptosis induced by BoHV-4 relied mainly on caspase-10 activation. (d) Infection of cocultures of A549 or OVCAR cells mixed with human 293 cells (in which BoHV-4 does not induce apoptosis) showed that BoHV-4 specifically eradicated A549 or OVCAR cancer cells from the cocultures. (e) Finally, in vivo experiments done with nude mice showed that BoHV-4 intratumoral injections reduced drastically the growth of preestablished A549 xenografts. Taken together, these results suggest that BoHV-4 may have potential as a viro-oncoapoptotic agent for the treatment of some human carcinomas. Moreover, further identification of BoHV-4 proapoptotic gene(s) and the cellular pathways targeted by this or these gene(s) could lead to the design of new cancer therapeutic strategies. [less ▲]

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See detailEndothelin-1 is a critical mediator of myogenic tone in tumor arterioles: implications for cancer treatment.
Sonveaux, Pierre; Dessy; MARTINIVE, Philippe ULg et al

in Cancer Research (2004), 1(64), 3209-14

Although derived from the host tissue, the tumor vasculature is under the influence of the tumor microenvironment and needs to adapt to the resistance to blood flow inherent to the dynamics of tumor ... [more ▼]

Although derived from the host tissue, the tumor vasculature is under the influence of the tumor microenvironment and needs to adapt to the resistance to blood flow inherent to the dynamics of tumor growth. Such vascular remodeling can offer selective targets to pharmacologically modulate tumor perfusion and thereby improve the efficacy of conventional anticancer treatments. Radiotherapy and chemotherapy can, indeed, take advantage of a better tumor oxygenation and drug delivery, respectively, both partly dependent on the tumor blood supply. Here, we showed that isolated tumor arterioles mounted in a pressure myograph have the ability, contrary to size-matched healthy arterioles, to contract in response to a transluminal pressure increase. This myogenic tone was exquisitely dependent on the endothelin-1 pathway because it was completely abolished by the selective endothelin receptor A (ETA) antagonist BQ123. This selectivity was additionally supported by the large increase in endothelin-1 abundance in tumors and the higher density of the ETA receptors in tumor vessels. We also documented by using laser Doppler microprobes and imaging that administration of the ETA antagonist led to a significant increase in tumor blood flow, whereas the perfusion in control healthy tissue was not altered. Finally, we provided evidence that acute administration of the ETA antagonist could significantly stimulate tumor oxygenation, as determined by electron paramagnetic resonance oximetry, and increase the efficacy of low-dose, clinically relevant fractionated radiotherapy. Thus, blocking the tumor-selective increase in the vascular endothelin-1/ETA pathway led us to unravel an important reserve of vasorelaxation that can be exploited to selectively increase tumor response to radiotherapy. [less ▲]

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See detailCaspase-8-dependent HER-2 cleavage in response to tumor necrosis factor alpha stimulation is counteracted by nuclear factor kappa B through c-FLIP-L expression
Benoit, Valérie; Chariot, Alain ULg; Delacroix, Laurence ULg et al

in Cancer Research (2004), 64(8), 2684-2691

The oncoprotein HER-2/neu is a prosurvival factor, and its overexpression has been correlated with poor prognosis in patients with breast cancer. We report that HER-2 is a new substrate for caspase-8 and ... [more ▼]

The oncoprotein HER-2/neu is a prosurvival factor, and its overexpression has been correlated with poor prognosis in patients with breast cancer. We report that HER-2 is a new substrate for caspase-8 and that tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) stimulation leads to an early caspase-8-dependent HER-2 cleavage in MCF7 A/Z breast adenocarcinoma cells defective for nuclear factor kappaB (NFkappaB) activation. We show that the antiapoptotic transcription factor NFkappaB counteracts this cleavage through induction of the caspase-8 inhibitor c-FLIP. Our results also demonstrate that this HER-2 cleavage contributes to the TNF-alpha-induced apoptosis pathway because ectopic expression of an uncleavable HER-2 protects NFkappaB-defective cells against TNF-alpha-mediated cell death. Therefore, we propose an original model in which NFkappaB exerts a new antiapoptotic function by counteracting TNF-alpha-triggered cleavage of the HER-2 survival factor. [less ▲]

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See detailOsteoblast-related transcription factors Runx2 (Cbfa1/AML3) and MSX2 mediate the expression of bone sialoprotein in human metastatic breast cancer cells
Barnes, G. L.; Javed, A.; Waller, S. M. et al

in Cancer Research (2003), 63(10), 2631-2637

Human breast cancers are known to preferentially metastasize to skeletal sites, however, the mechanisms that mediate the skeletal preference (orthotropism) of specific types of cancers remains poorly ... [more ▼]

Human breast cancers are known to preferentially metastasize to skeletal sites, however, the mechanisms that mediate the skeletal preference (orthotropism) of specific types of cancers remains poorly understood. There is a significant clinical correlation between the expression of bone sialoprotein (BSP) and skeletal metastasis of breast cancers. Our laboratory, as well as others, have proposed the concept that skeletal selective metastasis and associated disease may be attributable to a mimicry of skeletal cellular phenotypes by metastasizing cancer cells. We hypothesize that breast cancer cell expression of phenotypic properties of skeletal cell types, including BSP as one component of that phenotype, is the result of ectopic expression or activity of one or more central transcriptional regulators of bone cell gene expression. To test this hypothesis, we examined the molecular mechanisms that regulate bsp expression in human breast cancer cell lines with previously characterized metastatic potentials. Our results demonstrate that the majority of the distal bsp promoter sequences act to repress BSP expression in cancer cells and that most of the promoter activity resides in the proximal -110 by of the bsp promoter. In this region, we identified a putative Runx binding element providing a basis for a mechanism for skeletal gene activation. Our results demonstrate that Runx2 is ectopically expressed in breast cancer cells and that one isoform of Runx2 can activate bsp expression in these cells. In addition, we observe that bsp expression is additionally regulated by the homeodomain factor Msx2, another regulator of osteoblast-associated genes. Thus, this is the first report of osteoblast-related transcription factors being expressed in human breast cancer cells and provides a component of a mechanism that may explain the osteoblastic phenotype of human breast cancer cells that preferentially metastasize to bone. [less ▲]

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See detailTransactivation of vimentin by beta-catenin in human breast cancer cells
Gilles, Christine ULg; Polette, M.; Mestdagt, Mélanie ULg et al

in Cancer Research (2003), 63(10), 2658-2664

The cytoplasmic and nuclear redistribution of beta-catenin and the de novo expression of vimentin are frequently involved in the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition associated with increased invasive ... [more ▼]

The cytoplasmic and nuclear redistribution of beta-catenin and the de novo expression of vimentin are frequently involved in the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition associated with increased invasive/migratory properties of epithelial cells. Because beta-catenin can act as a coactivator of transcription through its binding to the T-cell factor (TCF)/lymphoid enhancer factor 1 transcription factor family, we have explored the possibility that beta-catenin/TCF could directly transactivate vimentin. We first compared vimentin expression in relation with the localization of beta-catenin in eight breast cancer cell lines displaying various degrees of invasiveness and in a model of cell migration using human mammary MCF10A cells. We could thus show a cytoplasmic and/or nuclear distribution of beta-catenin in invasive/migratory cells expressing vimentin, but not in noninvasive/stationary vimentin-negative cell lines. In addition, the human vimentin promoter was found to be up-regulated by beta-catenin and TCF-4 cotransfection. Varying with the cellular background, a diminution of this up-regulation was observed when the putative beta-catenin/TCF binding site of the vimentin promoter was mutated. Our results therefore demonstrate that the vimentin promoter is a target of the beta-catenin/TCF pathway and strongly suggest an implication of this regulation in epithelial cell migration/invasion. [less ▲]

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See detailOxytocin synthesis and oxytocin receptor expression by cell lines of human small cell carcinoma of the lung stimulate tumor growth through autocrine/paracrine signaling
Pequeux, Christel ULg; Breton, Christophe; Hendrick, Jean-Claude et al

in Cancer Research (2002), 62(16), 4623-4629

The objective of the present work was to investigate the existence of an oxytocin (OT)-mediated autocrine/paracrine signaling upon small cell carcinoma of the lung (SCCL) cell growth. In that view, OT ... [more ▼]

The objective of the present work was to investigate the existence of an oxytocin (OT)-mediated autocrine/paracrine signaling upon small cell carcinoma of the lung (SCCL) cell growth. In that view, OT receptor (OTR) expression, concomitant with OT synthesis and secretion, was evidenced on three different SCCL cell lines (DMS79, H146, and H345) and related to the vasopressin (VP) system. Specific OT, VP, OTR, Via VP receptor (V1aR), and V1b/V3 VP receptor (V1bR/V3R) transcripts were identified by reverse transcription-.PCR in all cell lines studied. Binding of I-125-(d(CH2)(5)(1),Tyr(Me)(2), Thr(4), Orn(3),Tyr(9)-NH2)-vasotocin (OVTA) was observed on all SCCL cell lines, with a K-d (dissociation constant) ranging from 0.025-0.089 nm, depending; on the cell line and the analytical method. Selectivity of I-125-OVTA binding was confirmed by displacement curves obtained with various OTR and VP receptor agonists and antagonists (OT, OVTA, L-371,257, VP, F180). Immunocytochemistry identified cellular OT and VP, and peptide secretion was measured in supernatants of SCCL cultures. [H-3]Thymidine incorporations, applied on H345 cells, demonstrated a dose-dependent mitogenic effect of exogenous OT (1 and 100 nM) that was abolished by the OTR antagonist OVTA. A decrease of proliferation was also observed with OVTA alone, showing a functional mitogenic effect of tumor-derived OT. Taken together, these observations demonstrate the existence of a functional OT-mediated autocrine/paracrine signaling actively implicated in growth and development of SCCL tumors. Furthermore, these findings point to the potential of OT antagonists for development as therapeutic agents for the treatment of SCCL. [less ▲]

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See detailThe tumorigenic diversity of the three PLAG family members is associated with different DNA binding capacities.
Hensen, Karen; Van Valckenborgh, Isabelle C C; Kas, Koen et al

in Cancer Research (2002), 62(5), 1510-7

Pleomorphic adenoma gene (PLAG) 1, the main translocation target in pleomorphic adenomas of the salivary glands, is a member of a new subfamily of zinc finger proteins comprising the tumor suppressor ... [more ▼]

Pleomorphic adenoma gene (PLAG) 1, the main translocation target in pleomorphic adenomas of the salivary glands, is a member of a new subfamily of zinc finger proteins comprising the tumor suppressor candidate PLAG-like1 (also called ZAC1 or lost on transformation 1) and PLAGL2. In this report, we show that NIH3T3 cells overexpressing PLAG1 or PLAGL2 display the typical markers of neoplastic transformation: (a) the cells lose cell-cell contact inhibition; (b) show anchorage-independent growth; and (c) are able to induce tumors in nude mice. In contrast, PLAGL1 has been shown to prevent the proliferation of tumor cells by inducing cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. This difference in function is also reflected in their DNA binding, as we show here that the three PLAG proteins, although highly homologous in their DNA-binding domain, bind different DNA sequences in a distinct fashion. Interestingly, the PLAG1- and PLAGL2-induced transformation is accompanied by a drastic up-regulation of insulin-like growth factor-II, which we prove is a target of PLAG1 and PLAGL2. This strongly suggests that the oncogenic capacity of PLAG1 and PLAGL2 is mediated at least partly by activating the insulin-like growth factor-II mitogenic pathway. [less ▲]

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See detailDown-Regulation of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor by Tissue Inhibitor of Metalloproteinase-2: Effect on in Vivo Mammary Tumor Growth and Angiogenesis
Hajitou, Amin; Sounni, Nor Eddine ULg; Devy, Laetitia et al

in Cancer Research (2001), 61(8), 3450-7

The tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-2 (TIMP-2) has at least two independent functions, i.e., regulation of matrix metalloproteinases and growth promoting activity. We investigated the effects of ... [more ▼]

The tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-2 (TIMP-2) has at least two independent functions, i.e., regulation of matrix metalloproteinases and growth promoting activity. We investigated the effects of TIMP-2 overexpression, induced by retroviral mediated gene transfer, on the in vivo development of mammary tumors in syngeneic mice inoculated with EF43.fgf-4 cells. The EF43.fgf-4 cells established by stably infecting the normal mouse mammary EF43 cells with a retroviral expression vector for the fgf-4 oncogene, are highly tumorigenic and overproduce vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Despite a promotion of the in vitro growth rate of EF43.fgf-4 cells overexpressing timp-2, the in vivo tumor growth was delayed. At day 17 post-cell injection, the volume of tumor derived from TIMP-2-overexpressing cells was reduced by 80% as compared with that obtained with control cells. Overexpression of TIMP-2 was associated with a down-regulation of VEGF expression in vitro and in vivo, a reduction of vessel size, density, and blood supply in the induced tumors. In addition, TIMP-2 completely inhibited the angiogenic activity of EF43.fgf-4 cell-conditioned medium in vitro using a rat aortic ring model. Our findings suggest that overexpression of TIMP-2 delays growth and angiogenesis of mammary carcinoma in vivo and that down-regulation of VEGF expression may play an important role in this TIMP-2-mediated antitumoral and antiangiogenic effects. Finally the in vivo delivery of TIMP-2, as assessed by i.v. injection of recombinant adenoviruses vectors, significantly reduced the growth of the EF43.fgf-4-induced tumors. This effect of TIMP-2 was shown to be equally comparable with that of angiostatin, a known potent inhibitor of angiogenesis. [less ▲]

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See detailExpression of the antiangiogenic factor 16K hPRL in human HCT116 colon cancer cells inhibits tumor growth in Rag1(-/-) mice
Bentzien, F.; Struman, Ingrid ULg; Martini, J. F. et al

in Cancer Research (2001), 61(19), 7356-62

The M(r) 16,000 NH(2)-terminal fragment of human prolactin (16K hPRL) is a potent antiangiogenic factor inhibiting endothelial cell function in vitro and neovascularization in vivo. The present study was ... [more ▼]

The M(r) 16,000 NH(2)-terminal fragment of human prolactin (16K hPRL) is a potent antiangiogenic factor inhibiting endothelial cell function in vitro and neovascularization in vivo. The present study was undertaken to test the ability of 16K hPRL to inhibit the growth of human HCT116 colon cancer cells transplanted s.c. into Rag1(-/-) mice. For this purpose, HCT116 cells were stably transfected with an expression vector encoding a peptide that included the signal peptide and first 139 amino acid residues of human prolactin (HCT116(16K)). Stable clones of HCT116(16K) cells secreted large amounts of biologically active 16K hPRL into the culture medium. Growth of HCT116(16K) cells in vitro was not different from wild-type HCT116 (HCT116(wt)) or vector-transfected HCT116 (HCT116(vector)) cells. Addition of recombinant 16K hPRL had no effect on the proliferation of HCT116(wt) cells in vitro. Tumor growth of HCT116(16K) cells implanted into Rag1(-/-) mice was inhibited 63% in four separate experiments compared with tumors formed from HCT116(wt) or HCT116(vector) cells. Inhibition of tumor growth of HCT116(16K) cells was correlated with a decrease in microvascular density by 44%. These data demonstrate that biologically active 16K hPRL can be expressed and secreted from human colon cancer cells using a gene transfer approach and that production of 16K hPRL by these cells was capable of inhibiting tumor growth and neovascularization. These findings support the potential of 16K hPRL as a therapeutic agent for the treatment of colorectal cancer. [less ▲]

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See detailPLAG1, the main translocation target in pleomorphic adenoma of the salivary glands, is a positive regulator of IGF-II.
Voz, Marianne ULg; Agten, N. S.; Van de Ven, W. J. et al

in Cancer Research (2000), 60(1), 106-13

PLAG1, a novel developmentally regulated C2H2 zinc finger gene, is consistently rearranged and overexpressed in pleomorphic adenomas of the salivary glands with 8q12 translocations. In this report, we ... [more ▼]

PLAG1, a novel developmentally regulated C2H2 zinc finger gene, is consistently rearranged and overexpressed in pleomorphic adenomas of the salivary glands with 8q12 translocations. In this report, we show that PLAG1 is a nuclear protein that binds DNA in a specific manner. The consensus PLAG1 binding site is a bipartite element containing a core sequence, GRGGC, and a G-cluster, RGGK, separated by seven random nucleotides. DNA binding is mediated mainly via three of the seven zinc fingers, with fingers 6 and 7 interacting with the core and finger 3 with the G-cluster. In transient transactivation assays, PLAG1 specifically activates transcription from its consensus DNA binding site, indicating that PLAG1 is a genuine transcription factor. Potential PLAG1 binding sites were found in the promoter 3 of the human insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II) gene. We show that PLAG1 binds IGF-II promoter 3 and stimulates its activity. Moreover, IGF-II transcripts derived from the P3 promoter are highly expressed in salivary gland adenomas overexpressing PLAG1. In contrast, they are not detectable in adenomas without abnormal PLAG1 expression nor in normal salivary gland tissue. This indicates a perfect correlation between PLAG1 and IGF-II expression. All of these results strongly suggest that IGF-II is one of the PLAG1 target genes, providing us with the first clue for understanding the role of PLAG1 in salivary gland tumor development. [less ▲]

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See detailA New Cis Element Is Involved in the Her2 Gene Overexpression in Human Breast Cancer Cells
Grooteclaes, Madeleine; Vernimmen, Douglas; Plaza, S. et al

in Cancer Research (1999), 59(11), 2527-31

The HER2 proto-oncogene product is overexpressed in 30% of breast cancers, and this correlates with poor prognosis. Increased levels of HER2 mRNA in breast cancer cell lines result from increased gene ... [more ▼]

The HER2 proto-oncogene product is overexpressed in 30% of breast cancers, and this correlates with poor prognosis. Increased levels of HER2 mRNA in breast cancer cell lines result from increased gene transcription. We report the identification of a new 17-bp-long cis sequence located between positions -506 and -489 from the transcription start site. This sequence is recognized by a trans-activating factor that we tentatively named HER2 transcription factor (HTF). This factor, involved in the increased transcription of the HER2 gene in the BT-474 mammary tumor cells, has a molecular weight of about Mr 50,000. HTF can also bind, but with a lower affinity, to a related cis sequence present in the epidermal growth factor receptor promoter. Interestingly, the HTF binding activity is high in nuclear extracts from several mammary tumor cells overexpressing the HER2 gene. [less ▲]

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See detailStable Inhibition of Nuclear Factor Kappab in Cancer Cells Does Not Increase Sensitivity to Cytotoxic Drugs
Bentires-Alj, M.; Hellin, A. C.; Ameyar, M. et al

in Cancer Research (1999), 59(4), 811-5

Several reports indicated that nuclear factor kappaB (NF-kappaB) activation by cytokines, cytotoxic drugs, or ionizing radiation protects cells against apoptosis. Therefore, we investigated the ... [more ▼]

Several reports indicated that nuclear factor kappaB (NF-kappaB) activation by cytokines, cytotoxic drugs, or ionizing radiation protects cells against apoptosis. Therefore, we investigated the consequence of NF-kappaB inhibition on the efficiency of antineoplastic agents. HPB, HCT116, MCF7, and OVCAR-3 cells stably expressing a dominant negative IkappaBalpha inhibitor showed a decreased NF-kappaB activation following treatment with tumor necrosis factor a and various chemotherapeutic agents. However, there was no difference in survival between parental cells and cells expressing mutated IkappaBalpha. These studies suggest that, at least in these cell lines, stable NF-kappaB inhibition did not modify the response to cytotoxic drugs. [less ▲]

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See detailConserved mechanism of PLAG1 activation in salivary gland tumors with and without chromosome 8q12 abnormalities: identification of SII as a new fusion partner gene.
Astrom, A. K.; Voz, Marianne ULg; Kas, K. et al

in Cancer Research (1999), 59(4), 918-23

We have previously shown (K. Kas et al, Nat. Genet., 15: 170-174, 1997) that the developmentally regulated zinc finger gene pleomorphic adenoma gene 1 (PLAG1) is the target gene in 8q12 in pleomorphic ... [more ▼]

We have previously shown (K. Kas et al, Nat. Genet., 15: 170-174, 1997) that the developmentally regulated zinc finger gene pleomorphic adenoma gene 1 (PLAG1) is the target gene in 8q12 in pleomorphic adenomas of the salivary glands with t(3;8)(p21;q12) translocations. The t(3;8) results in promoter swapping between PLAG1 and the constitutively expressed gene for beta-catenin (CTNNB1), leading to activation of PLAG1 expression and reduced expression of CTNNB1. Here we have studied the expression of PLAG1 by Northern blot analysis in 47 primary benign and malignant human tumors with or without cytogenetic abnormalities of 8q12. Overexpression of PLAG1 was found in 23 tumors (49%). Thirteen of 17 pleomorphic adenomas with a normal karyotype and 5 of 10 with 12q13-15 abnormalities overexpressed PLAG1, which demonstrates that PLAG1 activation is a frequent event in adenomas irrespective of karyotype. In contrast, PLAG1 was overexpressed in only 2 of 11 malignant salivary gland tumors analyzed, which suggests that, at least in salivary gland tumors, PLAG1 activation preferentially occurs in benign tumors. PLAG1 over-expression was also found in three of nine mesenchymal tumors, i.e., in two uterine leiomyomas and one leiomyosarcoma. RNase protection, rapid amplification of 5'-cDNA ends (5'-RACE), and reverse transcription-PCR analyses of five adenomas with a normal karyotype revealed fusion transcripts in three tumors. Nucleotide sequence analysis of these showed that they contained fusions between PLAG1 and CTNNB1 (one case) or PLAG1 and a novel fusion partner gene, i.e., the gene encoding the transcription elongation factor SII (two cases). The fusions occurred in the 5' noncoding region of PLAG1, leading to exchange of regulatory control elements and, as a consequence, activation of PLAG1 gene expression. Because all of the cases had grossly normal karyotypes, the rearrangements must result from cryptic rearrangements. The results suggest that in addition to chromosomal translocations and cryptic rearrangements, PLAG1 may also be activated by mutations or indirect mechanisms. Our findings establish a conserved mechanism of PLAG1 activation in salivary gland tumors with and without 8q12 aberrations, which indicates that such activation is a frequent event in these tumors. [less ▲]

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See detailThe ribonucleoside diphosphate reductase inhibitor (E)-2'-Deoxy-(fluoromethylene) cytidine, acts as a cytotoxic radiosensitizer on human cancer cell lines in vitro.
Coucke, Philippe ULg; Decosterd, L-A; Li, Y-X et al

in Cancer Research (1999), 59

ABSTRACT (E)-2*-Deoxy-(fluoromethylene)cytidine (FMdC) is known as an inhibitor of ribonucleoside diphosphate reductase, a key enzyme in the de novo pathway of DNA synthesis. FMdC was tested as a modifier ... [more ▼]

ABSTRACT (E)-2*-Deoxy-(fluoromethylene)cytidine (FMdC) is known as an inhibitor of ribonucleoside diphosphate reductase, a key enzyme in the de novo pathway of DNA synthesis. FMdC was tested as a modifier of radiation response in vitro on a human colon carcinoma cell line (WiDr), and the observed radiosensitization was confirmed on two human cervix cancer cell lines (C33-A and SiHa). Using the clonogenic assay, the effect ratio (ER) at a clinically relevant dose level of 2 Gy was 2.10 (50 nM FMdC), 1.70 (30 nM FMdC), and 1.71 (40 nM FMdC) for the three cell lines WiDr, C33-A, and SiHa, respectively. A more detailed analysis of the importance of timing and concentration of FMdC was done on the WiDr cell line alone, yielding an increased ER(2Gy) with increasing concentration and duration of exposure to the drug, ranging from 1.0 (6 h) to 1.8 (72 h) at 30 nM FMdC and from 1.2 (6 h) to 3.5 (24 h) at 300 nM. We investigated the effect of FMdC on the cellular deoxynucleotide triphosphate pool in WiDr cells and demonstrated a marked depletion of dATP and a significant rise of TTP levels. Cell cycle analysis showed early S-phase accumulation induced by FMdC alone, G2-M block induced by irradiation alone, and an increased accumulation of cells in G2-M if both modalities are used. Our data suggest that FMdC is a radiation response modifier in vitro on different cancer cell lines. The observed radiosensitization may in part be explained by alteration of the deoxynucleotide triphosphate pool, which is consistent with the effect of FMdC on ribonucleoside diphosphate reductase. [less ▲]

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See detailSPARC/osteonectin induces matrix metalloproteinase 2 activation in human breast cancer cell lines.
Gilles, Christine ULg; Bassuk, J. A.; Pulyaeva, H. et al

in Cancer Research (1998), 58(23), 5529-36

Activation of the matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP-2) has been shown to play a major role in the proteolysis of extracellular matrix (ECM) associated with tumor invasion. Although the precise mechanism of ... [more ▼]

Activation of the matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP-2) has been shown to play a major role in the proteolysis of extracellular matrix (ECM) associated with tumor invasion. Although the precise mechanism of this activation remains elusive, levels of the membrane type 1-MMP (MT1-MMP) at the cell surface and of the tissue inhibitor of MMP-2 (TIMP-2) appear to be two important determinants. Induction of MMP-2 activation in cells cultivated on collagen type I gels indicated that the ECM is important in the regulation of this process. In this study, we show that SPARC/osteonectin, a small ECM-associated matricellular glycoprotein, can induce MMP-2 activation in two invasive breast cancer cell lines (MDA-MB-231 and BT549) but not in a noninvasive counterpart (MCF-7), which lacks MT1-MMP. Using a set of peptides from different regions of SPARC, we found that peptide 1.1 (corresponding to the NH2-terminal region of the protein) contained the activity that induced MMP-2 activation. Despite the requirement for MT1-MMP, seen in MCF-7 cells transfected with MT1-MMP, the activation of MMP-2 by SPARC peptide 1.1 was not associated with increased steady-state levels of MT1-MMP mRNA or protein in either MT1-MMP-transfected MCF-7 cells or constitutively expressing MDA-MB-231 and BT549 cells. We did, however, detect decreased levels of TIMP-2 protein in the media of cells incubated with peptide 1.1 or recombinant SPARC; thus, the induction of MMP-2 activation by SPARC might be due in part to a diminution of TIMP-2 protein. We conclude that SPARC, and specifically its NH2-terminal domain, regulates the activation of MMP-2 at the cell surface and is therefore likely to contribute to the proteolytic pathways associated with tumor invasion. [less ▲]

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See detailAngiogenesis by Fibroblast Growth Factor 4 Is Mediated through an Autocrine Up-regulation of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Expression
Deroanne, Christophe ULg; Hajitou, Amin; Calberg-Bacq, Claire-M. et al

in Cancer Research (1997), 57

The infection of normal mouse mammary EF43 cells by a retroviral vector carrying either Fgf-3 (EF43.Fgf-3) or Fgf-4 (EF43.Fgf-4) cDNA resulted in the transformation of cells displaying different ... [more ▼]

The infection of normal mouse mammary EF43 cells by a retroviral vector carrying either Fgf-3 (EF43.Fgf-3) or Fgf-4 (EF43.Fgf-4) cDNA resulted in the transformation of cells displaying different tumorigenic potentials in nude mice (A. Hajitou and C-M. Calberg-Bacq, Int. J. Cancer, 63: 702-709, 1995). EF43.Fgf-4 produced rapidly developing tumors at all sites of inoculation, whereas EF43.Fgf-3 produced slowly growing tumors only in the mammary fat pad. Cells infected with the vector carrying the selection gene alone (EF43.C) were not tumorigenic. The angiogenic properties of these cells were tested in an in vitro angiogenesis model using human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) cultured at the surface of a type I collagen gel and their capacity to form tube-like structures on invasion of the gel. Only the conditioned medium (CM) of EF43.Fgf-4 induced an angiogenic morphotype in HUVECs. In parallel, the mRNA expression of matrix metalloproteinase 1 and c-ETS-1 was increased in the HUVECs displaying a differentiated phenotype, whereas the tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinase 1 mRNA level was decreased. Recombinant human fibroblast growth factor 4 (FGF-4) did not induce an angiogenic phenotype in HUVECs by itself. By Western blot analysis, a high expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) was detected in the EF43.Fgf-4 CM. This result was confirmed by Northern blot analysis of total RNA extracted from the three cell types; the steady-state level of VEGF mRNA was low and equivalent in EF43.C and EF43.Fgf-3, whereas it was strongly increased in EF43.Fgf-4. Culturing EF43 cells carrying only the selection gene with increasing concentrations of recombinant human FGF-4 resulted in a dose-dependent stimulation of VEGF. The induction of the angiogenic morphotype and the parallel modulations of the biosynthetic phenotype in HUVECs were completely suppressed by adding a neutralizing antibody directed against VEGF to EF43.Fgf-4 CM. Furthermore, inhibition of protein kinase C by bisindoylmaleimide suppressed the angiogenic phenotype induced by the CM of EF43.Fgf-4. Our results point to an indirect angiogenic activity of FGF-4 through the autocrine induction of VEGF secretion by EF43.Fgf-4 cells, an original signaling pathway that might be significant in tumor progression and metastasis. [less ▲]

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See detailTiming effect of combined radioimmunotherapy and radiotherapy on a human solid tumor in nude mice.
Coucke, Philippe ULg; Lin-Quan, Sun; Vogel, Charles-André et al

in Cancer Research (1997), 57

Timing effects of radioimmunotherapy (HIT) combined with external beam radiotherapy (RT) were assessed In human colon carcinoma xe nografts. Initially, dose effects offractlonated RT and RIT were ... [more ▼]

Timing effects of radioimmunotherapy (HIT) combined with external beam radiotherapy (RT) were assessed In human colon carcinoma xe nografts. Initially, dose effects offractlonated RT and RIT were evaluated separately. Then, 30 Gy RT (10 fractions over 12 days) were combined with three weekly Lv. injections of 200 g@Ci of 131I-labeled anti-carcino embryonic antigen monoclonal antibodies in four different treatment schedules. RIT was given either prior to, concurrently, Immediately after, or 2 weeks after RT administration. The longest regrowth delay (RD) of 105 days was observed in mice treated by concurrent administration of RT and lilT, whereas the RDs of RT and RIT alone were 34 and 20 days, respectively. The three sequential combination treatments produced sig nificantly shorter RDs ranging from 62 to 70 days. The tumor response represented by the minimal volume (MV) also showed that concurrent administration of RT and RIT gave the best result, with a mean MV of 4.5% as compared to MVs from 26 to 53% for the three sequential treatments. The results were confirmed In a second experiment, In which a RT of 40 Gy was combined with an identical lilT as above (three injections of 200 g&Ci of ‘31I-labeled monoclonal antibodies). At compa rable toxicity levels, the maximum tolerated RT or BIT alone gave shorter RDs and less tumor shrinkage compared to slinultaneous RT+RIT. These results may be useful for designing clinical protocols ofcombined RIT and RT. [less ▲]

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See detailAntitumor and radiosensitizing effects of (E)-2'-Deoxy-2'-(Fluoromethylene) cytidine, a novel inhibior of ribonucleotide diphosphate reductase on human colon carcinoma xenografts in nude mice.
Sun, Lin-Quan; Li, Ye-Xiong; Guillou, Louis et al

in Cancer Research (1997), 57

Antitumor and radiosensitizing effects of (E).2'-deoxy.2'-(fluromethyl ene) cytidine (FMdC), a novel inhibitor of ribonucleotide reductase, were evaluated on nude mice bearing s.c. xenografts and liver ... [more ▼]

Antitumor and radiosensitizing effects of (E).2'-deoxy.2'-(fluromethyl ene) cytidine (FMdC), a novel inhibitor of ribonucleotide reductase, were evaluated on nude mice bearing s.c. xenografts and liver metastases of a human colon carcinoma. FMdC given once daily or twice weekly has a dose-dependent antitumor effect. The maximum tolerated dose In the mice was reached with 10 mgi'kg applied daily over 12 days. Twice weekly administration of FMdC reduced its toxicity but lowered the antitumor effect. Treatment of preestablished liver micrometastases obtained via intrasplenic injection of tumor cells, with 5 or 10 mgfkg FMdC, signifi candy prolonged the survival of the mice as compared to controls (P < 0.025 and P < 0.001, respectively). Ten mg/kg resulted in longer survival than S mg/kg FMdC (P < 0.05). Radiotherapy alone of s.c. xenografts (10 fractions over 12 days) yielded the radiation dose required to produce local tumor control in 50% of the treated mice (TCD@O)of 43.0 Gy. When combined with FMdC, TCDsawas reduced to 22.5 and 19.0 Gy at doses of 5 and 10 mg/kg given i.p. 1 h before each irradiation, respec tively. The corresponding enhancement ratios were 1.91 and 2.43, respec lively. FMdC produced moderate and reversible myelosuppression. When 5 mg/kg FMdC was combined with irradiation, there was no increased skin or hematological toxicity as compared to radiotherapy or FMdC alone. At the 10 mg/kg level, however, lower leukocyte counts were observed. These results show that FMdC appears to be a potent anticancer drug and radiosensitizer [less ▲]

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See detailThrombospondin modulates human breast adenocarcinoma cell adhesion to human vascular endothelial cells.
Incardona, F.; Lewalle, J. M.; Morandi, V. et al

in Cancer Research (1995), 55(1), 166-73

hrombospondin (TSP), a M(r) 450,000 cytoadhesive glycoprotein, has been shown to potentiate tumor cell metastasis in mice by a mechanism that involves the hemostatic system of the host. In this study, the ... [more ▼]

hrombospondin (TSP), a M(r) 450,000 cytoadhesive glycoprotein, has been shown to potentiate tumor cell metastasis in mice by a mechanism that involves the hemostatic system of the host. In this study, the potential involvement of TSP in the interaction of human mammary adenocarcinoma MCF-7 cells with human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) in culture was investigated. Using an ELISA, preconfluent HUVECs synthesized 100-fold more TSP than did MCF-7 cells during 24 h of culture (20 versus 0.2 microgram/10(6) cells). Confocal microscopy localized TSP within intercellular junctions between aggregated MCF-7 cells in suspension. On adherent cells, TSP exhibited a patchy distribution both on the cell surface and in the cytosol. In HUVECs, TSP strongly stained the perinuclear space and was also found in association with cytoskeletal microfibrils. Flow cytometric analysis indicated the presence of a large number of unoccupied receptors for TSP on MCF-7 cells. Binding studies using [125I]TSP demonstrated the presence of 1.6 x 10(6) sites/cell with an apparent Kd of 28 nM. Attachment of radiolabeled MCF-7 cells to a TSP-coated substrate and to HUVEC monolayers was inhibited in the presence of a polyclonal antibody to TSP (10 micrograms/ml) or increasing concentrations (1-10 micrograms/ml) of soluble TSP. Neither nonimmune IgG nor the cell adhesion peptide Gly-Arg-Gly-Asp-Ser (100 micrograms/ml) inhibited these interactions. Inhibition was also observed with heparin (10 micrograms/ml), suggesting the participation of TSP heparin-binding domain(s) and heparin-like molecules. In the presence of an excess of soluble TSP or anti-TSP antibody, MCF-7 cells did not form aggregates in suspension and preformed aggregates were readily dissociated by the addition of soluble TSP. These results indicate that mammary adenocarcinoma cells use TSP to form aggregates and to attach to human endothelial cells. These interactions may have physiological implications during the hematogenous spread of tumor cells. [less ▲]

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See detailCombined radiotherapy and radioimmotherapy of human colon carcinoma grafted in nude mice.
Buchegger, F; Rojas, A; Delaloye, A et al

in Cancer Research (1995), 55

The effect of combined radioimmunotherapy (RIT) and fractionated external beam radiotherapy (RT) was assessed in two human colon cancer xenografts, Col 12 and LS174T in nude mice. These tumors were ... [more ▼]

The effect of combined radioimmunotherapy (RIT) and fractionated external beam radiotherapy (RT) was assessed in two human colon cancer xenografts, Col 12 and LS174T in nude mice. These tumors were selected for being resistant to RIT alone, as is usually the case in the clinical situation. Tumor-bearing mice were treated with a combination of five X-ray fractions over 5 days followed by RIT with two doses of 1.5 mCi 131I-labeled anticarcinoembryonic antigen monoclonal antibody F(ab')2. In Col 12 and LS174T, RIT alone achieved a regrowth delay similar to that of fractionated RT with total doses of 28 and 26 Gy, respectively. In both tumor types, an additive therapeutic effect, measured as increased regrowth delay or local control, was observed when combining RT of different dose levels with RIT. Normal tissue responses were assessed by monitoring acute peak skin reactions and blood cell count. Bone marrow depression for the combination treatment was similar to that of RIT alone; relative to skin, at equitoxic levels, no mice bearing Col 12 tumors were locally controlled with a 32 Gy RT dose alone, while this RT combined with RIT gave a local control of 100%. These studies show a therapeutic benefit when external beam RT is combined with RIT. [less ▲]

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