References of "Calcified Tissue International"
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See detailReduction in bone turnover results in a transient highly uniform mineralization state
Ruffoni, Davide ULg; Fratzl, P.; Roschger, P. et al

in CALCIFIED TISSUE INTERNATIONAL (2007), 80(1), 146-146

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See detailAddressing the musculoskeletal components of fracture risk with calcium and vitamin D: A review of the evidence
Boonen, S.; Bischoff-Ferrari, H. A.; Cooper, C. et al

in Calcified Tissue International (2006), 78(5), 257-270

Osteoporotic fractures are an extremely common and serious health problem in the elderly. This article presents the rationale for calcium and vitamin D supplementation in the prevention and treatment of ... [more ▼]

Osteoporotic fractures are an extremely common and serious health problem in the elderly. This article presents the rationale for calcium and vitamin D supplementation in the prevention and treatment of osteoporotic fractures and reviews the literature evidence on the efficacy of this strategy. Two musculoskeletal risk factors are implicated in osteoporotic fractures in the elderly: the loss of bone mass due to secondary hyperparathyroidism and the increased propensity to falls. Calcium and vitamin D reverse secondary hyperparathyroidism with resultant beneficial effects on bone mineral density (BMD). Additionally, calcium and vitamin D supplementation significantly improves body sway and lower extremity strength, reducing the risk of falls. The effects of combined calcium and vitamin D on parathyroid function and BMD provide a strong rationale for the use of this therapy in the prevention and treatment of osteoporosis and osteoporotic fractures. There is general agreement that, in patients with documented osteoporosis, calcium and vitamin D supplementation should be an integral component of the management strategy, along with antiresorptive or anabolic treatment. Frail elderly individuals constitute another major target population for calcium and vitamin D because evidence from randomized studies in institutionalized elderly subjects demonstrates that these supplements reduce osteoporotic fracture risk, particularly in the presence of dietary deficiencies. However, the results of trials in community-dwelling subjects have been equivocal. Within the primary-care setting, further research is required to establish appropriate target subgroups for calcium and vitamin D supplementation; overall, the data are consistent with a benefit individuals with insufficient calcium and/or vitamin D, although patients with documented osteoporosis will derive further benefit in terms of fracture prevention from the addition of an antiresorptive agent. [less ▲]

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See detailVitamin D analogs versus native vitamin D in preventing bone loss and osteoporosis-related fractures: A comparative meta-analysis
Richy, F.; Schacht, E.; Bruyère, Olivier ULg et al

in Calcified Tissue International (2005), 76(3), 176-186

It has been suggested that early postmenopausal women and patients treated with steroids should receive preventive therapy (calcium, vitamin D, vitamin D analogs, estrogens, or bisphosphonates) to ... [more ▼]

It has been suggested that early postmenopausal women and patients treated with steroids should receive preventive therapy (calcium, vitamin D, vitamin D analogs, estrogens, or bisphosphonates) to preserve their bone mineral density (BMD) and to avoid fragility fractures. We designed the present study to compare the effects of native vitamin D to its hydroxylated analogs alfacalcidol 1-alpha(OH)D and calcitriol 1,25(OH)(2)D. All randomized, controlled, double-blinded trials comparing oral native vitamin D and its analogs, alfacalcidol or calcitriol, to placebo or head-to-head trials in primary or corticosteroids-induced osteoporosis were included in the meta-analysis. Sources included the Cochrane Controlled Trials Register, EMBASE, MEDLINE, and a hand search of abstracts and references lists. The study period January 1985 to January 2003. Data were abstracted by two investigators, and methodological quality was assessed in a similar manner. Heterogeneity was extensively investigated. Results were expressed as effect-size (ES) for bone loss and as rate difference (RD) for fracture while allocated to active treatment or control. Publication bias was investigated. Fourteen studies of native vitamin D, nine of alfacalcidol, and ten of calcitriol fit the inclusion criteria. The two vitamin D analogs appeared to exert a higher preventive effect on bone loss and fracture rates in patients not exposed to glucocorticoids. With respect to BMD, vitamin D analogs versus placebo studies had an ES of 0.36 (P < 0.0001), whereas native vitamin D versus placebo had an ES of 0.17 (P = 0.0005), the interclass difference being highly significant (ANOVA-1, P < 0.05). When restricted to the lumbar spine, this intertreatment difference remained significant: ES = 0.43 (P = 0.0002) for vitamin D analogs and ES = 0.21 (P = 0.001) for native vitamin D (analysis of variance [ANOVA-1], P = 0.047). There were no significant differences regarding their efficacies on other measurement sites (ANOVA-1, P = 0.36). When comparing the adjusted global relative risks for fracture when allocated to vitamin D analogs or native vitamin D, alfacalcidol and calcitriol provided a more marked preventive efficacy against fractures: RD = 10% (95% Confidence interval [CI-2] to 17) compared to RD = 2% (95% CI, 1 to 2), respectively. The analysis of the spinal and nonspinal showed that fracture rates differed between the two classes, thereby confirming the benefits of vitamin D analogs, with significant 13.4% (95% CI 7.7 to 19.8) and. 6% (95% CI 1 to 12) lower fracture rates for vitamin D analogs, respectively. In patients receiving corticosteroid therapy, both treatments provided similar global ESs for BMD: ES = 0.38 for vitamin D analogs and ES = 0.41 for native vitamin D (ANOVA-1, P = 0.88). When restriced to spinal BMD, D analogs provided significant effects, whereas native vitamin D did not: ES = 0.43 (P < 0.0001) and ES = 0.33 (P = 0.21), respectively. The intertreatment difference was nonsignificant (ANOVA-1, P = 0.52). Neither D analogs for native vitamin D significantly prevented fractures in this subcategory of patients: RD = 2.6 (95%CI, -9.5 to 4.3) and RD = 6.4 (95%CI, -2.3 to 10), respectively. In head-to-head studies comparing D analogs and native vitamin D in patients receiving corticosteroids, significant effects favoring D analogs were found for femoral neck BMD: ES = 0.31 at P = 0.02 and spinal fractures: RD = 15% (95%CI, 6.5 to 25). Publication bias was not significant. Our analysis demonstrates a superiority of the D analogs atfacalcidol and calcitriol in preventing bone loss and spinal fractures in primary osteoporosis, including postmenopausal women. In corticosteroid-induced osteoporosis, the efficacy of D analogs differed depending on the comparative approach: indirect comparisons led to nonsignificant differences, whereas direct comparison did provide significant differences. In this setting, D analogs seem to prevent spinal fractures to a greater extent than do native vitamin D, but this assumption should be confirmed on a comprehensive basis in multiarm studies including an inactive comparator. [less ▲]

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See detailPatients at high risk of hip fracture benefit from treatment with strontium ranelate
Rizzoli, R.; Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg; Diaz-Curiel, M. et al

in Calcified Tissue International (2004), 74(S1), 83-84

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See detailOnce-monthly oral ibandronate a new bisphosphonate dosing concept
Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg; Miller, P.; Delmas, P. et al

in Calcified Tissue International (2004), 74(S1), 85

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See detailStrontium ranelate reduces the risk of vertebral and non-vertebral fractures in Caucasian women with post-menopausal osteoporosis.
Adami, S; Meunier, J; Devogelaer, JP et al

in Calcified Tissue International (2004), 74(S1), 37-38

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See detailStrontium ranelate reduces the risk of vertebral fractures in osteoporotic postmenopausal women without prevalent vertebral fracture
Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg; Rizzoli, R.; Balogh, A. et al

in Calcified Tissue International (2004), 74(S1), 83

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See detailStrontium ranelate reduces the risk of vertebral fractures in postmenopausal women with osteopenia
Sawicki, A.; Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg; Roux, C. et al

in Calcified Tissue International (2004), 74(S1), 84

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See detailDetection of bone sialoprotein in human (pre)neoplastic lesions of the uterine cervix
Detry, Cédric ULg; Waltregny, David ULg; Quatresooz, Pascale ULg et al

in Calcified Tissue International (2003), 73(1), 9-14

Bone sialoprotein (BSP) is a secreted glycoprotein primarily found in the mineral compartment of developing bones. BSP is detected in a variety of human cancers, particularly those that metastasize to the ... [more ▼]

Bone sialoprotein (BSP) is a secreted glycoprotein primarily found in the mineral compartment of developing bones. BSP is detected in a variety of human cancers, particularly those that metastasize to the skeleton. High expression of BSP in breast and prostate primary carcinomas is associated with progression and bone metastases development. Since squamous cell carcinoma (SCCs) of the uterine cervix also frequently metastasizes to bone, we investigated whether BSP is expressed in human cervical cancer. We examined BSP expression in cervical tissue samples from 47 patients, including 19 normal tissues, 20 squamous intraepithelial lesions (SILs) (9 low and 11 high grade) and 8 invasive SCCs. BSP protein expression was evaluated by the immunophosphatase technique using a BSP polyclonal antibody in paraffin-embedded cervical biopsies. The abundance of BSP protein was significantly higher in invasive SCCs and high grade SILs than in normal cervix tissue samples and low grade SILs, which showed no or a low level of anti-BSP immunoreactivity. In situ hybridization experiments performed on representative cervix invasive SCCs frozen sections revealed that BSP transcripts were detectable in these lesions. Our study demonstrates that BSP expression is a common feature in high grade SILs and invasive SCCs of the uterine cervix. The prognostic value of BSP detection in these lesions and the potential role of BSP as an angiogenic factor in this type of cancer are currently under investigation. [less ▲]

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See detailOnce weekly alendronate produces a greater increase in bone mineral density than daily risedronate
Hosking, D; Adami, S; Felsenberg, D et al

in Calcified Tissue International (2003), 72

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See detailInfluence of daily regimen calcium and vitamin D supplementation on parathyroid hormone secretion
Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg; Zegels, Brigitte ULg; Lejeune, Emmanuelle ULg et al

in Calcified Tissue International (2002), 70(2), 78-82

Calcium and vitamin D supplementation has been shown to reduce secondary hyperparathyroidism and play a role in the management of senile osteoporosis. In order to define the optimal regimen of calcium and ... [more ▼]

Calcium and vitamin D supplementation has been shown to reduce secondary hyperparathyroidism and play a role in the management of senile osteoporosis. In order to define the optimal regimen of calcium and vitamin D supplementation to produce the maximal inhibition of parathyroid hormone secretion, we have compared the administration of a similar amount of Ca and vitamin D, either as a single morning dose or split in two doses, taken 6 hours apart. Twelve healthy volunteers were assigned to three investigational procedures, at weekly intervals. After a blank control procedure, when they were not exposed to any drug intake, they received two calcium-vitamin D supplement regimens including either two doses of Orocal D3 (500 mg Ca and 400 IU vitamin D) 6 hours apart or one water-soluble effervescent powder pack of Cacit D3 in a single morning dose (1000 mg Ca and 880 IU vitamin D). During the three procedures (control and the two calcium-vitamin D supplementations), venous blood was drawn every 60 minutes for up to 9 hours, for serum Ca and serum PTH measurements. The order of administration of the two Ca and vitamin D supplementation sequences was allocated by randomization. No significant changes in serum Ca were observed during the study. During the 6 hours following Ca and vitamin D supplementation, a statistically significant decrease in serum PTH was observed with both regimens, compared with baseline and with the control procedure. Over this period of time, no differences were observed between the two treatment regimens. However, between the sixth and the ninth hour, serum PTH levels were still significantly decreased compared with baseline with split dose Orocal D3 administration, while they returned to baseline value with the Cacit D3 preparation. During this period, the percentage decrease in serum PTH compared with baseline was significantly more pronounced with Orocal D3 than with Cacit D3 (P = 0.0021). We therefore conclude that the administration of two doses of 500 mg of calcium and 400 IU of vitamin D3 6 hours apart provides a more prolonged decrease in serum PTH levels than the administration of the same total amount of Ca and vitamin D as a single morning dose in young healthy volunteers. This might have implications in terms of protection of the skeleton against secondary hyperparathyroidism and increased bone resorption and turnover in elderly subjects. [less ▲]

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See detailBone resorption in post-menopausal women with normal and low BMD assessed with biochemical markers specific for telopeptide derived degradation products of collagen type I
Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg; Henrotin, Yves ULg; Christiansen, C. et al

in Calcified Tissue International (2001), 69(3), 130-137

Biochemical markers of bone resorption can be used clinically to predict the risk of osteoporosis-related fractures (prognostic tool) and to assess the response of an osteoporotic patient to an ... [more ▼]

Biochemical markers of bone resorption can be used clinically to predict the risk of osteoporosis-related fractures (prognostic tool) and to assess the response of an osteoporotic patient to an antiresorptive therapy (monitoring tool). Our aim was to assess the ability of four currently marketed biochemical markers of bone resorption, based on the measurement of degradation products from collage type I telopeptides to monitor the elevated resorption associated with menopause. Women (846) were stratified for menopause, age, and bone mineral density and the following markers were measured: urinary cross-linked N-telopeptides of type I collagen (NTx), the levels of breakdown products of type I collagen C-telopeptides in serum (S-CTx), and in urine, by ELISA (U-CTx-E), and RIA (U-CTx-R). Furthermore, the ratio (a/b) between the aL form of CTx measured in the CTx RIA and the bL form measured in the ELISA was calculated. The mean difference was calculated for each marker in women with osteopenia (Op) or osteoporosis (PMO) (WHO definition) compared with healthy premenopausal (Pre) women and postmenopausal (N Post) women with normal bone mass. Serum CTx showed the highest elevation in post- compared with premenopausal women. All marker values were significantly higher in Op and PMO subjects compared with both Pre and to N Post women. Compared with premenopausal values, the largest elevation in both Op and PMO women was observed for serum CTx. Compared with N Post, urine NTx showed the highest increase in OP subjects. The a/b CTx ratio was elevated in post- compared with Pre women, but there was no difference in the ratio among N Post, Op, or PMO women. In conclusion, postmenopausal women showed elevated turnover with all bone resorption markers, but with substantial individual variation in resorption levels. Furthermore, the turnover process in postmenopausal women appears to be quantitatively different from the premenopausal stage, apparent as altered a/b CTx ratios. [less ▲]

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See detailDo estrogens effectively prevent osteoporosis-related fractures?
Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg; Bruyère, Olivier ULg; Audan, M. et al

in Calcified Tissue International (2000), 67

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See detailAlphacalcidol in Prevention of Glucocorticoid-Induced Osteoporosis
Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg; de Froidmont, C.; Lecart, M. P. et al

in Calcified Tissue International (1999), 65(4), 328-31

One of the major drawbacks of glucocorticoids long-term therapy is the occurrence of a severe osteoporosis characterized by fractures occurring at different sites, mainly at the level of trabecular bone ... [more ▼]

One of the major drawbacks of glucocorticoids long-term therapy is the occurrence of a severe osteoporosis characterized by fractures occurring at different sites, mainly at the level of trabecular bone. One of the major determinants of glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis is a decrease in the intestinal absorption of calcium (Ca) leading to a secondary hyperparathyroidism. D-hormones have been shown to significantly improve Ca absorption in the gut and subsequently to decrease parathyroid hormone circulating levels, hence normalizing bone turnover. In a recent study evaluating 145 patients suffering from diseases requiring long-term treatment with high doses of corticosteroids, we have demonstrated a significant benefit of alphacalcidol (1 microg/day) over placebo in terms of changes in bone mineral density of the lumbar spine. These results are in accordance with studies showing better prevention of bone loss and vertebral fractures in cardiac transplant patients treated with alphacalcidol than those treated with etidronate. There is now a convergent body of evidence to suggest that alphacalcidol is a reasonable, safe, and effective option for the prevention of glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis, provided that serum Ca is monitored on a regular basis. [less ▲]

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See detailRisedronate reduces fracture risk in women with established postmenopausal osteoporosis
Eastell, R; Minne, H; Sorensen, O et al

in Calcified Tissue International (1999), 64(S1), 43

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See detailRisedronate produces dose-dependent increases in bone mineral density in postmenopausal women with low bone mass
Fogelman, I; Ribot, C; Smith, R et al

in Calcified Tissue International (1999), 64(S1), 69

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See detailRaloxifene therapy for 3 years reduces the risk of incident vertebral fractures in postmenopausal women
Delmas, PD; Ensrud, KE; Harris, S et al

in Calcified Tissue International (1999), 64(S1), 43

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See detailRisedronate, a highly effective, short-term oral treatment for Paget’s disease: a dose-response study
Brown, JP; Hosking, DJ; Ste-Marie, LG et al

in Calcified Tissue International (1999), 64

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See detailRecommendations for the registration of drugs intended for use in the treatment of male osteoporosis
Kaufman, JM; Compston, J; Audran, MA et al

in Calcified Tissue International (1999), 65

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