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See detailGraft-versus-tumor effects after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation with nonmyeloablative conditioning
Baron, Frédéric ULg; Maris, Michael; Sandmaier, Brenda et al

in Blood (2004), 104

We have used a nonmyeloablative conditioning regimen consisting of 2 Gy total body irradiation +/– fludarabine, 30 mg/m²/day x 3 days, to condition elderly or ill patients (pts) with hematological ... [more ▼]

We have used a nonmyeloablative conditioning regimen consisting of 2 Gy total body irradiation +/– fludarabine, 30 mg/m²/day x 3 days, to condition elderly or ill patients (pts) with hematological malignancies for allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). This approach relies almost exclusively on graft-versus-tumor (GVT) effects for control of malignancy. Here, we analyzed GVT effects in 322 pts with hematological malignancies given grafts from HLA-matched related (n=192) or unrelated (n=130) donors. Grades I, II, III and IV acute GVHD were seen in 26 (8.1%), 141 (43.8%), 34 (10.6%) and 11 (3.4%) pts, respectively. Extensive chronic GVHD was seen in 181 (56.2%) pts and of these, 64 (19.9%) cases had de novo chronic GVHD. Putative GVT effects were evaluated using time-dependent Cox regression models. Of the 221 pts with measurable disease at HCT, 126 (57%) achieved complete (n=98) or partial (n=28) remissions. Multivariate analysis identified chemosensitivity for B-cell malignancies (p=.02), and tandem autologous/allogeneic HCT (p=.04) as pre-transplant factors associated with higher probabilities of achieving complete remissions (CR) after HCT. After adjusting for these factors, acute GVHD of any grade was not found to be associated with an increased probability of achieving CR. There was a trend for a higher probability of achieving CR in pts with chronic GVHD (p=.07). Progression/relapse was observed in 108 pts. Multivariate analysis identified that lower disease-risk (p=.0004), tandem autologous/allogeneic HCT (p=.02) and adapted Charlson comorbidity index (CCI) score at transplant < 3 (p=.002) resulted in significantly decreased risk of progression/relapse. After correcting for these factors, extensive chronic GVHD was associated with a decreased risk of progression/relapse (p=.006). Pts with grade 1 acute GVHD tended to have less progression/relapse (p=.07). Conversely, grade II–IV acute GVHD did not significantly affect the risk of progression/relapse. Nonrelapse mortality was observed in 70 pts. Multivariate analysis showed that lower disease-risk (p=. 001), tandem autologous/allogeneic HCT (p=.002) and CCI score at transplant < 3 (p<.0001) significantly decreased nonrelapse mortality. After adjusting for these variables, grade II (p=.04) and grade III–IV (p<.0001) acute GVHD increased nonrelapse mortality while extensive chronic GVHD did not. The 3-year probability of progression-free survival (PFS) was 38.5%. In multivariate analysis, lower disease-risk (p<.0001), tandem autologous/allogeneic HCT (p=.0008) and CCI score at transplant < 3 (p<.0001) resulted in significantly better PFS. After adjusting for theses variables, grade 1 acute GVHD (p=.02) and chronic extensive GVHD (p=.003) were both associated with significantly better PFS, while grade III–IV acute GVHD (p<.0001) was associated with decreased PFS. In summary, chronic GVHD in pts given nonmyeloablative conditioning was associated with substantial GVT effects which led to improved PFS. Conversely, any potential GVT benefits from grade II–IV acute GVHD were offset by higher nonrelapse mortality resulting in worse PFS. Efforts should be directed at reducing the risk of grade II–IV acute GVHD while allowing de novo chronic GVHD for best PFS after allogeneic HCT with nonmyeloablative conditioning. [less ▲]

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See detailSustained correction of B-cell development and function in a murine model of X-linked agammaglobulinemia (XLA) using retroviral-mediated gene transfer
Yu, P. W.; Tabuchi, R. S.; Kato, R. M. et al

in Blood (2004), 104(5), 1281-90

X-linked agammaglobulinemia (XLA) is a human immunodeficiency caused by mutations in Bruton tyrosine kinase (Btk) and characterized by an arrest in early B-cell development, near absence of serum ... [more ▼]

X-linked agammaglobulinemia (XLA) is a human immunodeficiency caused by mutations in Bruton tyrosine kinase (Btk) and characterized by an arrest in early B-cell development, near absence of serum immunoglobulin, and recurrent bacteria infections. Using Btk- and Tec-deficient mice (BtkTec-/-) as a model for XLA, we determined if Btk gene therapy could correct this disorder. Bone marrow (BM) from 5-fluorouracil (5FU)-treated BtkTec-/- mice was transduced with a retroviral vector expressing human Btk and transplanted into BtkTec-/- recipients. Mice engrafted with transduced hematopoietic cells exhibited rescue of both primary and peripheral B-lineage development, revocery of peritoneal B1 B cells, and correction of serum immunoglobulin M (IgM) and IgG3 levels. Gene transfer also restored T-independent type II immune responses, and B-cell antigen receptor (BCR) proliferative responses. B-cell progenitors derived from Btk-transduced stem cells exhibited higher levels of Btk expression than non-B cells; and marking studies demonstrated a selective advantage for Btk-transduced B-lineage cells. BM derived from primary recipients also rescued Btk-dependent function in secondary hosts that had received a transplant. Together, these data demonstrate that gene transfer into hematopoietic stem cells can reconstitute Btk-dependent B-cell development and function in vivo, and strongly support the feasibility of pursuing Btk gene transfer for XLA. [less ▲]

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See detailPharmacological evaluation of BM-573, a dual thromboxane A(2) receptor antagonist and thromboxane synthase inhibitor, as potential anti-metastatic agent
de Leval, X. J.; Dassesse, T.; Benoit, V. et al

in Blood (2003, November 16), 102(11, Part 2), 72

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See detailOverexpression of the platelet P2X1 ion channel in transgenic mice generates a novel prothrombotic phenotype.
Oury, Cécile ULg; Kuijpers, Marijke; Toth-Zsamboki, Emese et al

in Blood (2003)

This study describes transgenic mice overexpressing the human P2X(1) ion channel in the megakaryocytic cell lineage. Platelets from these mice display increased secretion and aggregation evoked by low ... [more ▼]

This study describes transgenic mice overexpressing the human P2X(1) ion channel in the megakaryocytic cell lineage. Platelets from these mice display increased secretion and aggregation evoked by low doses of collagen, convulxin, or the thromboxane A(2) mimetic U46619. Perfusing whole blood from transgenic mice over collagen fibers at a shear rate of 1000 seconds(-1) resulted in increased P2X(1)-dependent aggregate formation and phosphatidylserine exposure. Platelet hyperreactivity to collagen was correlated with up-regulated extracellular signal-regulated kinase 2 (ERK2) phosphorylation. In a viscometer, shear stress caused potent aggregation of transgenic platelets under conditions in which wild-type platelets did not aggregate. In an in vivo model of thromboembolism consisting of intravenous injection of a low dose of collagen plus epinephrine, transgenic mice died more readily than wild-type mice. Preinjection of U0126 not only fully protected transgenic mice against thrombosis, it also enhanced the survival of wild-type mice injected with a higher collagen dose. Hence, the platelet P2X(1) ion channel plays a role in hemostasis and thrombosis through its participation in collagen-, thromboxane A(2)-, and shear stress-triggered platelet responses. Activation of the ERK2 pathway is instrumental in these processes. [less ▲]

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See detailIntensive conventional chemotherapy (ACVBP regimen) compared with standard CHOP for poor-prognosis aggressive non-Hodgkin lymphoma
Tilly, Hervé; Lepage, Eric; Coiffier, Bertrand et al

in Blood (2003), 102(13), 4284-4289

We conducted a randomized trial to compare the intensive conventional chemotherapy regimen ACVBP (doxorubicin, cyclophosphamide, vindesine, bleomycin, prednisone) with standard CHOP (cyclophosphamide ... [more ▼]

We conducted a randomized trial to compare the intensive conventional chemotherapy regimen ACVBP (doxorubicin, cyclophosphamide, vindesine, bleomycin, prednisone) with standard CHOP (cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone) in previously untreated patients with poor-risk aggressive lymphoma. Patients aged 61 to 69 years who had aggressive non-Hodgkin lymphoma with at least one prognostic factor of the age-adjusted international prognostic index (IPI) were included. ACVBP consisted of an induction phase of intensified chemotherapy and central nervous system (CNS) prophylaxis followed by a sequential consolidation phase. Of the 708 patients registered for the study, 635 were eligible. The rate of complete response was 58% in the ACVBP group and 56% in the CHOP group (P =.5). Treatment-related death occurred in 13% of the ACVBP group and 7% of the CHOP group (P =.014). At 5 years, the event-free survival was 39% in the ACVBP group and 29% in the CHOP group (P =.005). The overall survival was significantly longer for patients treated with ACVBP, at 5 years it was 46% compared with 38% for patients treated with CHOP (P =.036). CNS progressions or relapses were more frequent in the CHOP group (P =.004). Despite higher toxicity, the ACVBP regimen, used as first-line treatment for patients with poor-risk aggressive lymphoma, is superior to standard CHOP with regard to both event-free survival and overall survival. (C) 2003 by The American Society of Hematology. [less ▲]

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See detailConstitutive nuclear factor-kappa B activity preserves homeostasis of quiescent mature lymphocytes and granulocytes by controlling the expression of distinct Bcl-2 family proteins
Bureau, Fabrice ULg; Vanderplasschen, Alain ULg; Jaspar, Fabrice ULg et al

in Blood (2002), 99(10), 3683-3691

Constitutive nuclear factor kappaB (NFkappaB) activity protects quiescent mature Immune cells from spontaneous apoptosis. Here, we examined whether NF-kappaB exerts its antiapoptotic function in these ... [more ▼]

Constitutive nuclear factor kappaB (NFkappaB) activity protects quiescent mature Immune cells from spontaneous apoptosis. Here, we examined whether NF-kappaB exerts its antiapoptotic function in these cells through the control of Bcl-2 family proteins. Specific pharmacologic inhibitors of NF-kappaB were used to achieve total NF-kappaB inactivation In quiescent human blood lymphocytes, granulocytes, and monocytes. NF-kappaB inhibition induced drastic lymphocyte and granulocyte apoptosis, but only moderate monocyte apoptosis. T- and B-cell apoptosis was slow and associated with a gradual down-regulation of the prosurvival Bcl-2 family proteins Bcl-X-L and BcI-2, respectively. By contrast, granulocyte apoptosis was fast and accompanied by a rapid cellular accumulation of Bcl-x(s), the proapoptotic Bcl-x isoform that is generated from alternative splicing of the bcl-x pre-mRNA. Finally, antisense bci-x(L) and bcl-2 knockdown in T and B cells, respectively, and induction of Bcl-xs expression in granulocytes through antisense oligonucleotide-mediated redirection of bcl-x pre-mRNA splicing were sufficient to induce significant apoptosis in these cells. Taken together, these results reveal that basal NF-kappaB activity preserves homeostasis of quiescent mature lymphocytes and granulocytes through regulation of distinct members of the Bcl-2 family. This study sheds light on the constitutive mechanisms by which NF-kappaB maintains defense integrity. (C) 2002 by The American Society of Hematology. [less ▲]

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See detailAdhesion of synchronized human hematopoietic progenitor cells to fibronectin and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 fluctuates reversibly during cell cycle transit in ex vivo culture.
Huygen, Sandra; Giet, Olivier ULg; Artisien, Vincent et al

in Blood (2002), 100(8), 2744-52

Ex vivo expansion of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells may result in defective engraftment. Human cord blood CD34(+) progenitor cells were synchronized and assayed for adhesion and migration onto ... [more ▼]

Ex vivo expansion of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells may result in defective engraftment. Human cord blood CD34(+) progenitor cells were synchronized and assayed for adhesion and migration onto fibronectin (Fn) and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) at different stages of a first cell cycle executed ex vivo. During S phase transit, adhesion to Fn was transiently increased while binding to VCAM-1 was reversibly decreased, after which adhesion to both ligands returned to baseline levels with cell cycle completion. Transmigration across Fn and VCAM-1 decreased irreversibly during S phase progression. The function of alpha4 and alpha5 integrins was assessed with specific neutralizing antibodies. In uncultured CD34(+) cells and long-term culture-initiating cells (LTC-ICs), both adhesion and migration on Fn were inhibited by anti-alpha4 but not by anti-alpha5 antibodies. In mitotically activated CD34(+) cells and LTC-ICs, adhesion and migration on Fn were mainly dependent on alpha5 integrin and to a lesser extent on alpha4 integrin. Changes in integrin function were not dependent on parallel modulation of integrin expression. In conclusion, Fn and VCAM-1 binding of progenitor cells fluctuates reversibly during cell cycle transit ex vivo. In addition, our data show that mitogenic activation induces a shift from a dominant alpha4 to a preferential alpha5 integrin-dependent interaction with Fn. [less ▲]

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See detailIncreased binding and defective migration across fibronectin of cycling hematopoietic progenitor cells.
Giet, Olivier ULg; Van Bockstaele, Dirk R; Di Stefano, Ivano et al

in Blood (2002), 99(6), 2023-31

Engraftment of hematopoietic progenitor cells has been shown to decrease during cell cycle transit. We studied cell cycle-associated changes in adhesion and migration of mitotically activated cord blood ... [more ▼]

Engraftment of hematopoietic progenitor cells has been shown to decrease during cell cycle transit. We studied cell cycle-associated changes in adhesion and migration of mitotically activated cord blood CD34+ cells. Migration toward medium conditioned by the stromal-derived factor-1-producing cell line MS-5 was studied in bovine serum albumin- and fibronectin (Fn)-coated transwells. Migration was reduced in cycling CD34+ cells and long-term culture-initiating cells (LTC-ICs) compared with their noncycling counterparts across Fn but not across bovine serum albumin. Conversely, Fn binding was higher in cycling CD34+ cells and LTC-ICs compared with noncycling progenitor cells, while adhesion of both subsets to bovine serum albumin was undetectable. The contribution of alpha4 and alpha5 integrins in mediating adhesion and migration of activated CD34+ cells onto Fn was analyzed by neutralization experiments. While alpha4-mediated Fn binding decreased during G(2)/M, alpha5 integrin-mediated adhesion increased during transit from G(0)/G(1) to S and G(2)/M phases. As for migration, the contribution of alpha4 integrin was similar in all phases, whereas alpha5-directed migration was lower in G(2)/M compared with G(0)/G(1) and S phases. Defective migration of cycling CD34+ cells was not due to differences in alpha5 integrin expression. In conclusion, chemotaxis across Fn is less efficient in cycling progenitor cells in correlation with an increased Fn binding capacity. In addition, alpha4 and alpha5 integrin functions are independently modulated during cell cycle transit. [less ▲]

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See detailP2X(1)-mediated activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 2 contributes to platelet secretion and aggregation induced by collagen.
Oury, Cécile ULg; Toth-Zsamboki, Emese; Vermylen, Jos et al

in Blood (2002)

This study shows that mild platelet stimulation with collagen rapidly releases ATP, which activates the P2X(1)-PKC-ERK2 pathway. This process enhances further degranulation of the collagen-primed granules ... [more ▼]

This study shows that mild platelet stimulation with collagen rapidly releases ATP, which activates the P2X(1)-PKC-ERK2 pathway. This process enhances further degranulation of the collagen-primed granules allowing platelet aggregation to be completed. [less ▲]

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See detailDoes the P(2X1del) variant lacking 17 amino acids in its extracellular domain represent a relevant functional ion channel in platelets?
Oury, Cécile ULg; Toth-Zsamboki, Emese; Vermylen, Jos et al

in Blood (2002)

In this letter, we questionned the existence of a ADP responsive P2X1 protein variant in platelets.

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See detailEnhanced Platelet Reactivity to Collagen and Shear Stress in Transgenic Mice Overexpressing the Platelet P2X1 Ion Channel
Oury, Cécile ULg; Kuijpers, Marijke; Toth-Zsamboki, Emese et al

in Blood (2002), 100

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See detailLeukemic target susceptibility to natural killer cytotoxicity: relationship with BCR-ABL expression.
Baron, Frédéric ULg; Turhan, Ali G; Giron-Michel, Julien et al

in Blood (2002), 99(6), 2107-13

Chronic myeloid leukemia is a clonal myeloproliferative expansion of transformed primitive hematopoietic progenitor cells characterized by high-level expression of BCR-ABL chimeric gene, which induces ... [more ▼]

Chronic myeloid leukemia is a clonal myeloproliferative expansion of transformed primitive hematopoietic progenitor cells characterized by high-level expression of BCR-ABL chimeric gene, which induces growth factor independence. However, the influence of BCR-ABL expression on cell-mediated cytotoxicity is poorly understood. In the present study, we asked whether BCR-ABL expression interferes with leukemic target sensitivity to natural killer (NK) cell cytolysis. Our approach was based on the use of 2 BCR-ABL transfectants of the pluripotent hematopoietic cell line UT-7 expressing low (UT-7/E8, UT-7/G6) and high (UT-7/9) levels of BCR-ABL. As effector cells, we used CD56(bright), CD16-, CD2- NK cells differentiated in vitro from CD34 cord blood progenitors. We demonstrated that BCR-ABL transfectants UT-7/9 were lysed by NK cells with a higher efficiency than parental and low UT-7/E8.1 and UT-7/G6 transfectants. This enhanced susceptibility to lysis correlated with an increase in expression of intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) by target cells. Treatment of UT-7/9 cells by STI571 (a specific inhibitor of the abl kinase) resulted in a decrease in NK susceptibility to lysis and ICAM-1 down-regulation in target cells. Furthermore, the constitutive activation of nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) detected in BCR-ABL transfectant UT-7/9, was significantly attenuated when cells were treated by STI571. Interestingly, inhibition of NF-kappaB activation by BAY11-67082 (a specific NF-kappaB inhibitor) resulted in down-regulation of ICAM-1 expression and a subsequent decrease in NK-induced killing of UT-7/9 transfectants. Our results show that oncogenic transformation by BCR-ABL may increase susceptibility of leukemic progenitors to NK cell cytotoxicity by a mechanism involving overexpression of ICAM-1 as a consequence of NF-kappaB activation. [less ▲]

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See detailEffects of BM-573, a dual thromboxane A(2) receptor antagonist and thromboxane synthase inhibitor, on osteogenic sarcoma cell-induced platelet aggregation
de Leval, X.; David, Jean-Louis ULg; Neven, P. et al

in Blood (2001, November 16), 98(11, Part 2), 43

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See detailAlkaline phosphatase positive reticular cell network recovery after radiation-induced marrow aplasia in mice
Almohamad, K.; Thiry, Anne-Marie ULg; Boniver, Jacques ULg et al

in Blood (2001, November 16), 98(11, Part 2), 141

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See detailMegakaryocyte (MK) clone size is inversely related to CFU-MK responsiveness to thrombopoietin (TPO)
Paulus, Jean-Michel ULg; Vainchenker, W.; Debili, N.

in Blood (2001, November 16), 98(11, Part 2), 119-119

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See detailCessation of intensive treatment with recombinant human erythropoietin is followed by secondary anemia.
Piron, Maude ULg; Loo, Martine; Gothot, André ULg et al

in Blood (2001), 97(2), 442-8

Little information is available on the evolution of erythropoiesis after interruption of recombinant human erythropoietin (rHuEpo) therapy. Iron-overloaded rats received 20 daily injections of rHuEpo ... [more ▼]

Little information is available on the evolution of erythropoiesis after interruption of recombinant human erythropoietin (rHuEpo) therapy. Iron-overloaded rats received 20 daily injections of rHuEpo. During treatment, reticulocytes, soluble transferrin receptor (sTfR), and hematocrit increased progressively. This was accompanied by a substantial expansion of spleen erythropoiesis but a decrease in the bone marrow. Five weeks after treatment, rats developed a significant degree of a regenerative anemia. Erythropoietic activity, as assessed by reticulocytes, sTfR, erythroid cellularity, iron incorporation into heme, and the number of erythroid colonies, was severely depressed 3 weeks after cessation of rHuEpo. This was followed by regeneration of erythroblasts and reticulocytes at weeks 6 to 7 post-Epo, but erythroid progenitors recovered only partially by that time. The anemia was definitely corrected 2 months after cessation of rHuEpo treatment. Serum Epo levels remained elevated for several weeks, but the sensitivity of marrow erythroid precursors to Epo was preserved. No rat antibodies to rHuEpo were detected, and serum from post-Epo animals did not exert any inhibitory activity on erythropoiesis. In conclusion, after cessation of intensive rHuEpo therapy, there was a strong inhibition of erythropoietic activity with secondary anemia followed by late recovery. This was not due to antibodies or other soluble inhibitory factors, a defect in endogenous Epo production, or a loss of sensitivity to Epo. This may rather represent intrinsic erythroid marrow exhaustion, mostly at the level of erythroid progenitors but also at later stages of erythropoiesis. [less ▲]

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