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See detailPlace of residence as a risk factor for hip fracture? A case-control 3-year study
Bruyère, Olivier ULg; Pieck, C.; Hiligsmann, Mickaël ULg et al

in Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases (2008, June), 67(Suppl.II), 428

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See detailEffects of a single 5 mg infusion of zoledronic acid and oral risedronate (5 mg/day) on bone remodeling over one year in patients with glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis
Saag, K. G.; Devogelaer, Jean-Pierre; Reid, D. M. et al

in Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases (2008, June), 67(Suppl.II), 542

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See detailAssociation between changes in bone mineral density and vertebral fracture incidence in untreated postmenopausal women : a 3-year prospective study
Bruyère, Olivier ULg; Roces-Varela, A.; Adami, Silvio et al

in Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases (2008, June), 67(Suppl.II), 89

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See detailStrontium ranelate decreases the risk of hip fracture over 3 and 5 years in post menopausal women at high risk
Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg; Felsenberg, D.; Boonen, Steven et al

in Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases (2008, June), 67(Suppl.II), 540

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See detailVertebral fracture efficacy of monthly ibandronate versus weekly bisphosphonates: analysis of a retrospective cohort study
Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg; Boisdron, J.; Barr, C. E.

in Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases (2008, June), 67(Suppl.II), 539

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See detailEffects of Strontium Ranelate on Spinal Osteoarthritis Progression
Bruyère, Olivier ULg; Delferriere, D.; Roux, C. et al

in Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases (2008), 67(3), 335-9

OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to determine whether a 3-year treatment with strontium ranelate could delay the progression of spinal osteoarthritis (OA). METHODS: This study was a post-hoc analysis ... [more ▼]

OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to determine whether a 3-year treatment with strontium ranelate could delay the progression of spinal osteoarthritis (OA). METHODS: This study was a post-hoc analysis of pooled data from the Spinal Osteoporosis Therapeutic Intervention (SOTI) and TReatment Of Peripheral OSteoporosis (TROPOS) trials performed on 1105 women with osteoporosis and concomitant radiological spinal OA at baseline, and for whom lumbar x-rays were available at baseline and over the 3-year treatment period. The presence and severity of osteophytes, disc space narrowing and sclerosis in the lumbar intervertebral spaces was graded according to a validated method, and an overall OA score was calculated for each intervertebral space. Back pain (measured on a five-point Likert scale only in SOTI) and health-related quality of life (SF-36 questionnaire) were assessed at baseline and after 3 years. Patients who suffered an incident or progressive vertebral fracture during the study were excluded from the analysis. RESULTS: The proportion of patients with worsening overall spinal OA score was reduced by 42% in the strontium ranelate group, compared with placebo (RR, 0.58; 95% CI, 0.42 to 0.79; p = 0.0005). Significantly more patients in the strontium ranelate group experienced an improvement in back pain after 3 years, compared with placebo (p = 0.03), while no significant difference was observed in terms of health-related quality of life between these patient groups. CONCLUSIONS: The results of this post-hoc analysis suggest that strontium ranelate could reduce the progression of the radiographic features of spinal OA and back pain in women with osteoporosis and prevalent spinal OA. [less ▲]

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See detailOne-Year Follow-up of Coll2-1, Coll2-1no2 and Myeloperoxydase Serum Levels in Osteoarthritis Patients after Hip or Knee Replacement
Deberg, Michelle ULg; Dubuc, Jean Emile; Labasse, Alain ULg et al

in Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases (2008), 67(2), 168-74

OBJECTIVES: To determine Coll2-1, Coll2-1NO(2) and myeloperoxydase (MPO) levels in serum of patients with knee or hip osteoarthritis (OA) before the surgery, 3 months and 1 year after knee or hip ... [more ▼]

OBJECTIVES: To determine Coll2-1, Coll2-1NO(2) and myeloperoxydase (MPO) levels in serum of patients with knee or hip osteoarthritis (OA) before the surgery, 3 months and 1 year after knee or hip replacement. METHODS: Coll2-1, Coll2-1NO(2) and MPO were measured in 103 patients with isolated symptomatic knee or hip OA candidates for joint replacement. Sera were taken the day before surgery, 3 months and 1 year after hip or knee replacement. Coll2-1 and Coll2-1NO(2) immunohistochemistry was performed on biopsies removed from cartilage lesions. RESULTS: Immunostainings revealed the extensive presence of Coll2-1 and Coll2-1NO(2) in the superficial layer of fibrillated cartilage and around some chondrocytes clusters. Three months after joint replacement, Coll2-1 and MPO serum levels were decreased and even reached the reference value for Coll2-1. By contrast, Coll2-1NO(2) levels remained elevated. At 1-year follow-up, Coll2-1 levels remained at the reference value, MPO levels were similar to those measured at 3 months, and Coll2-1NO(2) levels were unchanged and comparable to the pre-surgery values. However, in patients with pre-surgery values above the median (more than 0.42 nM), Coll2-1NO(2) levels significantly and progressively decreased post-operatively, but tended towards an increase in patients with pre-surgery Coll2-1NO(2) values below the median. CONCLUSIONS: The normalisation of Coll2-1 levels 3 months after surgery indicates that Coll2-1 is a disease-specific marker that is sensitive to the structural changes occurring in a single joint. Furthermore, the immunohistochemical findings are consistent with the concept that the major source of serum Coll2-1 is the damaged articular cartilage. Finally, serum MPO levels decreased after joint replacement indicating that neutrophil activation occurs in OA joints, even in the late stage of the disease. [less ▲]

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See detailEfficacy and tolerability of once-monthly oral ibandronate in postmenopausal osteoporosis: 2 Year results from the MOBILE study (Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases (2006) 65, (654-661))
REGINSTER, Jean-Yves ULg; Adami, S.; Lakatos, P. et al

in Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases (2008), 67(2), 280

[No abstract available]

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See detailFollow-up of Coll2-1, Coll2-1 NO2 and myeloperoxidase in dog after transection of the cruciate ligament of the knee
Henrotin, Yves ULg; Pelletier, JP; Martel-Pelletier, J et al

in Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases (2008), 67(Suppl.2), 593

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See detailPositive effects of strontium ranelate on spine osteoarthritis progression
Bruyère, Olivier ULg; Delferriere, D.; Roux, C. et al

in Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases (2007, July), 66(Suppl.II), 58

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See detailEvaluation of the efficacy and safety of etoricoxib compared with naproxen in two, 138-week randomised studies of patients with osteoarthritis
Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg; Malmstrom, K.; Mehta, A. et al

in Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases (2007), 66(7), 945-951

Objectives: To assess the efficacy and safety of etoricoxib 60 mg once daily and naproxen 500 mg twice daily over a 138- week treatment period in patients with osteoarthritis ( OA). Methods: Two 1- year ... [more ▼]

Objectives: To assess the efficacy and safety of etoricoxib 60 mg once daily and naproxen 500 mg twice daily over a 138- week treatment period in patients with osteoarthritis ( OA). Methods: Two 1- year randomised, double blind, parallel group two- part base studies ( part I 12 weeks; part II 40 weeks), followed by an 86- week extension, in patients with OA ( hip or knee) were conducted at 80 clinical centres ( 19 countries). The studies had identical designs. Patients taking placebo in part I received etoricoxib or naproxen ( 1: 1 ratio) in part II and the extension; patients taking etoricoxib or naproxen in part I continued to receive the same treatment throughout the entire length of the studies. Co- primary efficacy end points were patient global assessment of disease status, and WOMAC questionnaire pain subscale and physical function subscale ( 100 mm VAS). Efficacy over 138 weeks was assessed by graphical analysis. Safety was assessed by observation of adverse experiences and laboratory and physical evaluations. Results: 997 patients entered ( 615 completed) the base studies. Of these patients, 463 patients entered the extensions. A total of 161 and 152 patients in the etoricoxib and naproxen groups, respectively, completed 138 treatment weeks. Etoricoxib and naproxen showed similar efficacy throughout the 138 weeks of treatment. For etoricoxib and naproxen, respectively, WOMAC pain assessments were 67 and 67 mm ( baseline); 28 and 29 mm ( 1 year), and 34 and 33 mm ( 138 weeks). Results for the other efficacy end points were similar to those seen with the WOMAC pain assessments. Both etoricoxib and naproxen were generally well tolerated. Conclusion: Both etoricoxib and naproxen demonstrated long- term clinical efficacy for the treatment of OA. Etoricoxib and naproxen were generally well tolerated. [less ▲]

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See detailLong term efficacy of strontium ranelate in reducing the risk of vertebral and non-vertebral including hip fractures in post menopausal osteoporotic women over 5 years
Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg; Brixen, Kim; Cormier, C. et al

in Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases (2007, June), 66(Suppl.II), 102

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See detailImproved blood pressure control but similar efficacy with lumiracoxib 100 mg OD compared to ibuprofen 600 mg TID in hypertensive patients with osteoarthritis: randomised controlled trial
MacDonald, T.; Littlejohn, T.; Richard, D. et al

in Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases (2007, June), 66(Suppl.II), 502

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See detailAdalimumab alone and in combination with disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis in clinical practice: the Research in Active Rheumatoid Arthritis (ReAct) trial
Burmester, G. R.; Mariette, X.; Montecucco, C. et al

in Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases (2007), 66(6), 732-739

Objective: To evaluate the safety and effectiveness of adalimumab alone or in combination with standard disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs) for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA ... [more ▼]

Objective: To evaluate the safety and effectiveness of adalimumab alone or in combination with standard disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs) for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Methods: Patients with active RA despite treatment with DMARDs or prior treatment with a tumour necrosis factor antagonist participated in a multicentre, open-label clinical study of adalimumab 40 mg every other week for 12 weeks with an optional extension phase. Patients were allowed to continue with pre-existing traditional DMARDs. Long- term safety results are reported for all patients (4210 patient-years (PYs) of adalimumab exposure). The observed effectiveness results at week 12 are reported using American College of Rheumatology (ACR) and European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) response criteria. Results: Among the 6610 treated patients, adalimumab was generally well tolerated. Serious infections occurred in 3.1% of patients (5.5/100 PYs, including active tuberculosis, 0.5/100 PYs). Demyelinating disease (0.06%) and systemic lupus erythematosus (0.03%) were rare serious adverse events. The standardised incidence ratio of malignancy was 0.71 (95% CI 0.49 to 1.01). The standardised mortality ratio was 1.07 ( 95% CI 0.75 to 1.49). At week 12, 69% of patients achieved an ACR20 response, 83% a moderate, and 33% a good EULAR response. Adalimumab was effective in combination with a variety of DMARDs. The addition of adalimumab to antimalarials was comparably effective to the combination of adalimumab and methotrexate. Conclusions: Considering the limitations of an open- label study, adalimumab alone or in combination with standard DMARDs appeared to be well tolerated and effective in 6610 difficult- to- treat patients with active RA treated in clinical practice. [less ▲]

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See detailA prospective randomised multicentre study comparing continuous and intermittent treatment with celecoxib in patients with osteoarthritis of the knee or hip
Luyten, F. P.; Geusens, P.; Malaise, Michel ULg et al

in Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases (2007), 66(1), 99-106

Objective: To compare the effects of continuous and intermittent celecoxib treatment in patients with knee or hip osteoarthritis in flare. Methods: In this 24-week, prospective, randomised, double-blind ... [more ▼]

Objective: To compare the effects of continuous and intermittent celecoxib treatment in patients with knee or hip osteoarthritis in flare. Methods: In this 24-week, prospective, randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled study, patients were randomly assigned to receive continuous (n = 62) or intermittent (n = 61) treatment with celecoxib 200 mg once daily. The primary efficacy end point was the area under the curve (AUC) of the change in the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) total scores between baseline and week 24 divided by the time interval. Secondary end points included the percentage of days with intake of the flare drug, the AUC of the change in the WOMAC total scores, the mean change from baseline in the WOMAC scores, and the patient's and physician's global assessment of osteoarthritis. Results: There were no significant differences between patients randomised to continuous or intermittent treatment in the primary end point or most of the secondary end points, although a consistent trend supporting continuous treatment was observed. The percentage of days with intake of the flare drug was significantly lower (p = 0.031) in the group receiving continuous versus intermittent celecoxib. Both treatment regimens were well tolerated. Conclusion: The results of this pilot study indicate a potential clinical difference between continuous and intermittent treatment with celecoxib, and may be useful in designing future trials. A larger trial on both efficacy and safety outcomes is required for conclusive evidence in favour of either continuous or intermittent treatment. [less ▲]

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See detailInfluence of specific rehabilitation programs on pressure pain thresholds in patients with fibromyalgia or chronic low back pain
Maquet, Didier ULg; Demoulin, Christophe ULg; Lecart, Marie-Paule ULg et al

in Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases (2007), 66

Background: Specific rehabilitation programs are recommended in chronic pain syndromes. The subjective experience and multidimensional nature of pain is problematic for assessment. Pressure pain threshold ... [more ▼]

Background: Specific rehabilitation programs are recommended in chronic pain syndromes. The subjective experience and multidimensional nature of pain is problematic for assessment. Pressure pain threshold (PPT) is defined as the minimum force applied which induces pain measured with a dolorimeter. Objectives: The purposes were: (1) to compare PPTs for 18 specific tender sites in patients with fibromyalgia (FM) and in patients with chronic low back pain (CLBP), (2) to assess the PPT changes in these groups following specific rehabilitation programs. Methods: Eleven women with CLBP and six women with FM were included in this study. They attended biweekly specific multidisciplinary rehabilitation sessions for 8 weeks. Pain intensity and PPTs for the 18 specific tender sites defined by the American College of Rheumatology were evaluated respectively with a visual analogue scale (VAS) and with an electronic dolorimeter, before and after the programs. Normative data of PPTs were established in a recent study [1]. Results: Before starting the rehabilitation program, patients with FM displayed VAS scores higher (p<0.05) than those with CLBP. Furthermore, FM patients had the lowest (p<0.05) PPTs over all examined areas. Statistical analysis failed to show any differences between PPTs of CLBP and healthy subjects. At the end of the specific program, VAS scores decreased significantly in both patient groups. In contrast, a significant increase of PPTs was only observed in FM patients. However, their PPTs remained below the CLBP and healthy PPT values. Conclusion: Despite the presence of chronic pain in these two syndromes, the decrease of PPTs appears to be specific in patients with FM. Measure of PPTs could represent a relevant method in order to perform a longitudinal follow-up of patient's pain perception. After the rehabilitation programs, pain intensity decreased in both patient groups. References: [1] Maquet D, Croisier JL, Demoulin C, Crielaard JM. Pressure pain thresholds of tender point sites in patients with fibromyalgia and in healthy controls. Eur J Pain, 2004, 8:111-117. [less ▲]

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See detailUse of magnetic resonance imaging and 31p-spectroscopy to explore muscle energetics in fibromyalgia patients
Maquet, Didier ULg; Vanderthommen, Marc ULg; Lecart, Marie-Paule ULg et al

in Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases (2007), 66

Background: Fibromyalgia (FM) is defined as a chronic syndrome characterized by diffuse pain. FM patients generally complain of muscle fatigue during physical activities and symptoms worsening after ... [more ▼]

Background: Fibromyalgia (FM) is defined as a chronic syndrome characterized by diffuse pain. FM patients generally complain of muscle fatigue during physical activities and symptoms worsening after exercise. Some studies have explored muscle performances in FM patients. Similarly, we reported that all variables of muscle performances were decreased in FM patients as compared to the controls [1]. We found that muscle impairment predominated over aerobic processes. The 31P nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMRS) appears especially useful to study muscle energy metabolism because it is non-invasive and allows the exploration during exercise. Objectives: The purposes were: (1) to determine the maximal transverse section (MTS) of calf muscles by Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) in order to calculate the individual mechanical loads of exercise without requiring the measurement of the maximal voluntary torque; (2) to monitor, by 31P-NMRS, high-energy phosphate metabolism and intracellular pH at rest, during exercise and recovery periods by means of continuous spectra acquisitions with an adequate temporal resolution; (3) to determine an original efficacy muscular index with the help of the ergometric and spectroscopic parameters; (4) to explore the oxidative pathway by means of determination of the PCr rephosphorylation time constant. Methods: Eight women with fibromyalgia (FM) and 30 healthy volunteers were included in this study. MRI of the dominant leg was acquired in order to determine the MTS of calf muscles and thus to calculate the different loads of exercise (dynamic plantar flexions). Subjects performed 3-6 bouts of 2 minutes with workload increments until exhaustion. Spectra were acquired continuously at rest, during the exercise and recovery periods. The analysis concerned the gamma-, alpha- and beta- ATP, Pi, PCr peaks, and intracellular pH. At the end of the exercise, the muscular efficacy index and the PCr re-phosphorylation time constant were calculated. Results: The MTS of the ankle plantar flexors reached respectively 43 cm² and 36.7 cm² in the control and FM groups (p > 0.05). No significant difference (p > 0.05) was observed between both groups in spectroscopic data registered at rest [10.7 (control) vs 9.1 (FM) for PCr/Pi rest ; 7.01 (control) vs 6.99 (FM) for pHrest] and at the end of exercise [1.18 (control) vs 0.68 (FM) for PCr/Pi end ; 6.89 (control) vs 6.81 (FM) for pHend]. However, the muscular efficacy index was significantly reduced in FM patients (1.25) in comparison with control group (2.46) (p < 0.05). Two patients presented an index extremely low (0.3 and 0.4). The PCr time constant was not different between control subjects (27.7 s) and FM patients (25.6 s) (p > 0.05). Conclusion: Our original protocol, not based on maximum voluntary contraction assessment, did not indicate any abnormalities in glycolytic and oxydative pathways in FM patients. We demonstrated a low efficiency of chemical to mechanical energy shift in FM patients. These results suggested a deconditioning syndrome without primitive muscular abnormalities in FM patients and displayed the importance of aerobic muscular rehabilitation. References: [1]Maquet D, Croisier JL, Renard C, Crielaard JM. Muscle performance in patients with fibromyalgia. J Bone Spine. 2002;69:293-9. [less ▲]

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See detailA long-term, open-label trial of the safety and efficacy of etanercept (Enbrel) in patients with rheumatoid arthritis not treated with other disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs
Klareskog, L.; Gaubitz, M.; Rodriguez-Valverde, V. et al

in Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases (2006), 65(12), 1578-1584

Objective: To evaluate the long-term safety and efficacy of etanercept in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Methods: 549 patients entered this 5-year, open-label extension study and received etanercept ... [more ▼]

Objective: To evaluate the long-term safety and efficacy of etanercept in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Methods: 549 patients entered this 5-year, open-label extension study and received etanercept 25 mg twice weekly. All patients showed inadequate responses to disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs before entry into the double-blind studies. Safety assessments were carried out at regular intervals. Primary efficacy end points were the numbers of painful and swollen joints; secondary variables included American College of Rheumatology (ACR) response rate, Disease Activity Score and acute-phase reactants. Efficacy was analysed using the last-observation-carried-forward approach. Results: Of the 549 patients enrolled in the open-label trial, 467 (85%), 414 (75%) and 371 (68%) completed 1, 2 and 3 years, respectively; 363 (66%) remained in the study at the time of this analysis. A total exposure of 1498 patient-years, including the double-blind study, was accrued. In the open-label trial, withdrawals for efficacy-related and safety-related reasons were 11% and 13%, respectively. Frequent adverse events included upper respiratory infections, flu syndrome, rash and injection-site reactions. Rates of serious infections and malignancies remained unchanged over the course of the study; there were no reports of patients with central demyelinating disease or serious blood dyscrasias. After 3 years, ACR20, ACR50 and ACR70 response rates were 78%, 51% and 27%, respectively. The Disease Activity Score score was reduced to 3.0 at 3 months and 2.6 at 3 years from 5.1. A sustained improvement was found in Health Assessment Questionnaire scores throughout the 3-year time period. Conclusion: After 3 years of treatment, etanercept showed sustained efficacy and a favourable safety profile. [less ▲]

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