References of "Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases"
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See detailIntensive and prolonged health promotion strategy may increase self-reported osteoporosis prevalence among postmenopausal women
Tellier, V; De Maeseneer, J; Cartier, P et al

in Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases (2000), 59(S1), 58

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See detailIsokinetic evaluation of knee extensors and flexors in patients with unilateral symptomatic gonarthrosis
Henrotin, Yves ULg; Croisier, Jean-Louis ULg; Dumont, R et al

in Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases (2000), 59(S1), 275

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See detailInterest of the simple calculated osteoporosis risk estimation (SCORE) tool for a more rational use of bone densitometry
Ben Sedrine, Wafa ULg; Devogelaer, Jean-Pierre; Kaufman, Jean-Marc et al

in Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases (2000), 59(Suppl.1), 80-81

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See detailThe simple calculated osteoporosis risk estimation (SCORE) does not allow identification of Belgian women with a high risk of osteoporosis
Ben Sedrine, Wafa ULg; Devogelaer, Jean-Pierre; Kaufman, Jean-Marc et al

in Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases (2000), 59(Suppl.1), 80

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See detailBackground for studies on the treatment of male osteoporosis: state of the art.
Kaufman, J M; Johnell, O; Abadie, Eric ULg et al

in Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases (2000), 59(10), 765-72

Male osteoporosis represents an important, although long underestimated, public health problem. Both in men and in women aging is accompanied by continuous bone loss and by an exponential increase in the ... [more ▼]

Male osteoporosis represents an important, although long underestimated, public health problem. Both in men and in women aging is accompanied by continuous bone loss and by an exponential increase in the incidence of osteoporotic fracture, with a female to male incidence ratio of about 2 to 3 to 1 in the elderly for hip and vertebral fractures. Morbidity after osteoporotic fractures appears to be more serious and mortality more common in men than in women. To date, no single treatment has been proved to be effective and safe in published prospective studies. The present report, based on a systematic search of the literature on male osteoporosis, summarises the state of the art on the clinical consequences of male osteoporosis and its risk factors, in relation to the present state of knowledge about female osteoporosis. This constitutes the background for the design of rational clinical development strategies for therapeutic interventions in male osteoporosis. From this review of the literature it is apparent that notwithstanding the existing sex differences in pathophysiology of osteoporosis and the difference in age-specific incidence of osteoporotic fractures, there are also important similarities between osteoporosis in women and men. The higher incidence of fracture in women than in men results from quantitative differences in risk factors rather than from different risk factors. Even though there are sex differences in bone geometry, incidence of fracture seems to be similar in men and women for a same absolute areal bone mineral density. However, the lack of data on the changes in fracture rates in men resulting from pharmacological intervention, leading to changes in bone mineral density or bone turnover, remains the main limitation for extrapolation of established treatment outcomes from women to men. [less ▲]

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See detailRecommendations for registration of drugs used in the treatment of osteoarthritis
Dougados, M; Devogelaer, JP; Annefeldt, M et al

in Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases (1996), 55

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See detailPaget's Disease of Bone Treated with a Five Day Course of Oral Tiludronate
Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg; Lecart, Marie-Paule ULg; Deroisy, Rita ULg et al

in Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases (1993), 52(1), 54-7

Chloro-4-phenyl thiomethylene bisphosphonate (tiludronate) is a new drug which can be used as an inhibitor of bone resorption. As it remains in bone for a long time, and as mineralisation defects have ... [more ▼]

Chloro-4-phenyl thiomethylene bisphosphonate (tiludronate) is a new drug which can be used as an inhibitor of bone resorption. As it remains in bone for a long time, and as mineralisation defects have only been seen at doses much higher than those required to decrease osteoclastic activity, it could be given at high doses over a short period of time. Eighteen patients with Paget's disease of bone were randomly allocated to three therapeutic groups receiving respectively 600, 800, and 1200 mg/day tiludronate for five days. Serum alkaline phosphatase activity and the urinary hydroxyproline/creatinine ratio were quickly and drastically reduced in all three groups. A significant reduction of serum alkaline phosphatases and the hydroxyproline/creatinine ratio was still present six months after the five day therapeutic course, reflecting a sustained activity of tiludronate even after stopping treatment. Dose dependent short and long term reductions of bone turnover rate were observed. Biochemical assessment of haematological, renal, or hepatic tolerance did not show any toxicity of tiludronate. Fifty per cent of patients treated by a dose of 1200 mg/day reported gastrointestinal disturbances, however, making this dosage unsuitable for clinical practice. [less ▲]

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