References of "Advances in Space Research"
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See detailDYNAMO: a Mars upper atmosphere package for investigating solar wind interaction and escape processes, and mapping Martian fields
Chassefière, E.; Nagy, A.; Mandea, M. et al

in Advances in Space Research (2004), 33

DYNAMO is a small multi-instrument payload aimed at characterizing current atmospheric escape, which is still poorly constrained, and improving gravity and magnetic field representations, in order to ... [more ▼]

DYNAMO is a small multi-instrument payload aimed at characterizing current atmospheric escape, which is still poorly constrained, and improving gravity and magnetic field representations, in order to better understand the magnetic, geologic and thermal history of Mars. The internal structure and evolution of Mars is thought to have influenced climate evolution. The collapse of the primitive magnetosphere early in Mars history could have enhanced atmospheric escape and favored transition to the present arid climate. These objectives are achieved by using a low periapsis orbit. DYNAMO has been proposed in response to the AO released in February 2002 for instruments to be flown as a complementary payload onboard the CNES Orbiter to Mars (MO-07), foreseen to be launched in 2007 in the framework of the French PREMIER Mars exploration program. MO-07 orbital phase 2b (with an elliptical orbit of periapsis 170 km), and in a lesser extent 2a, offers an unprecedented opportunity to investigate by in situ probing the chemical and dynamical properties of the deep ionosphere, thermosphere, and the interaction between the atmosphere and the solar wind, and therefore the present atmospheric escape rate. Ultraviolet remote sensing is an essential complement to characterize high, tenuous, layers of the atmosphere. One Martian year of operation, with about 5,000 low passes, should allow DYNAMO to map in great detail the residual magnetic field, together with the gravity field. Additional data on the internal structure will be obtained by mapping the electric conductivity, sinergistically with the NETLANDER magnetic data. Three options have been recommended by the International Science and Technical Review Board (ISTRB), who met on July 1st and 2nd, 2002. One of them is centered on DYNAMO. The final choice, which should be made before the end of 2002, will depend on available funding resources at CNES. [less ▲]

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See detailXMM-Newton high-resolution X-ray spectroscopy of the Wolf-Rayet object WR25 (WN6ha+O4f)
Raassen, A. J. J.; van der Hucht, K. A.; Mewe, R. et al

in Advances in Space Research (2003), 32(6), 1161-1165

We report the analysis of the X-ray spectrum of the Wolf-Rayet star WR 25, observed by RGS and EPIC-MOS on board XMM-Newton. Temperatures up to 40 MK have been determined. Strong absorption, exceeding the ... [more ▼]

We report the analysis of the X-ray spectrum of the Wolf-Rayet star WR 25, observed by RGS and EPIC-MOS on board XMM-Newton. Temperatures up to 40 MK have been determined. Strong absorption, exceeding the value due to the Inter Stellar Medium (ISM) has been detected and assigned to the dense stellar wind. (C) 2003 COSPAR. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailThe NETLANDER Ionosphere and Geodesy Experiment
Barriot, Jean-Pierre; Dehant, Véronique; Folkner, W. et al

in Advances in Space Research (2001), 28(8), 1237-1249

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See detailMultispectral observations of Jupiter's Aurora
Waite, J. H.; Grodent, Denis ULg; Mauk, B. M. et al

in Advances in Space Research (2000), 26(10), 1453-1475

Remote sensing of Jupiter's aurora from x-ray to radio wavelengths has revealed much about the nature of the jovian aurora and about the impact of ionosphere-magnetosphere coupling on the upper atmosphere ... [more ▼]

Remote sensing of Jupiter's aurora from x-ray to radio wavelengths has revealed much about the nature of the jovian aurora and about the impact of ionosphere-magnetosphere coupling on the upper atmosphere of Jupiter, As indicated by the combination of x-ray and ultraviolet observations, both energetic heavy ions and electrons energized in the outer magnetosphere contribute to auroral excitation. Imaging with the Hubble Space Telescope in the ultraviolet and with the InfraRed Telescope Facility at infrared wavelengths shows several distinct regions of interaction: 1) a dusk sector where turbulent auroral patterns extend well into the polar cap; 2) a morning sector generally characterized by a single spatially confined auroral are originating in the outer or middle magnetosphere of Jupiter; 3) diffuse emissions associated with the Io plasma - spectroscopy has provided important information about the thermal structure of Jupiter's auroral atmosphere and the altitude distribution of auroral particle energy deposition, while Lyman alpha line profiles yield clues to the nature of thermospheric dynamical effects. Galileo observations at visible wavelengths on the nightside offer a new view of the jovian aurora with unprecedented spatial information. Infrared observations have added much to the understanding of thermal structure at all latitudes, the dynamics of the thermospheric wind system, and auroral morphology, and may hold the key to understanding the role of Joule heating in Jupiter's thermosphere. ROSAT observations have revealed soft x-ray emissions from Jupiter's lower latitudes as well as from the auroral zones, implying that energetic particle precipitation also occurs at low latitudes in regions magnetically linked to the inner radiation belts. In this review, multispectral observations of jovian auroral emissions are presented within a theoretical/modeling framework that is intended to provide some insight into magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling and its effects on the upper atmosphere. (C) 2000 COSPAR. Published by Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailImaging the solar corona in the EUV
Delaboudiniere, J.-P.; Stern, R. A.; Maucherat, A. et al

in Advances in Space Research (1997), 20

The SOHO (SOlar and Heliospheric Observatory) satellite was launched on December 2nd 1995. After arriving at the Earth-Sun (L1) Lagrangian point on February 14th 1996, it began to continuously observe the ... [more ▼]

The SOHO (SOlar and Heliospheric Observatory) satellite was launched on December 2nd 1995. After arriving at the Earth-Sun (L1) Lagrangian point on February 14th 1996, it began to continuously observe the Sun. As one of the instruments onboard SOHO, the EIT (Extreme ultraviolet Imaging Telescope) images the Sun's corona in 4 EUV wavelengths. The He II filter at 304 AË images the chromosphere and the base of the transition region at a temperature of 5 - 8 x 10^4 K; the Fe IX-X filter at 171 AË images the corona at a temperature of ~ 1.3 x 10^6 K; the Fe XII filter at 195 AË images the quiet corona outside coronal holes at a temperature of ~ 1.6 x 10^6 K; and the Fe XV filter at 284 AË images active regions with a temperature of ~ 2.0 x 10^6 K. About 5000 images have been obtained up to the present. In this paper, we describe also some aspects of the telescope and the detector performance for application in the observations. Images and movies of all the wavelengths allow a look at different phenomena present in the Sun's corona, and in particular, magnetic field reconnection. [less ▲]

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See detailA first look at the ASSI ultraviolet results
Chakrabarti, S.; Gladstone, G. R.; Tobiska, W. K. et al

in Advances in Space Research (1993), 13

The Airglow and Solar Spectrometer Instrument (ASSI) on the San Marco D satellite has obtained near-simultaneous measurements of solar irradiances and airglow emissions in the 200-7000 A spectral region ... [more ▼]

The Airglow and Solar Spectrometer Instrument (ASSI) on the San Marco D satellite has obtained near-simultaneous measurements of solar irradiances and airglow emissions in the 200-7000 A spectral region. The satellite was placed in an equatorial, elliptical orbit on 25 March 1988, which permitted observations of airglow emissions in the 280-600-km altitude range at various local times. The instrument complement on the satellite provides an opportunity both for self-consistent examination of the excitation mechanisms of various airglow features and for constraining model parameters. An overview of the data obtained by ASSI is presented along with preliminary modeling results of the UV airglow. [less ▲]

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