References of "World Journal of Gastroenterology"
     in
Bookmark and Share    
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailRationale for the potential use of mesenchymal stromal cells in liver transplantation
Vandermeulen, M.; DE ROOVER, Arnaud ULg; BRIQUET, Alexandra ULg et al

in World Journal of Gastroenterology (in press)

Detailed reference viewed: 24 (5 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailDonation after cardio-circulatory death liver transplantation.
Le Dinh; DE ROOVER, Arnaud ULg; KABA, Abdourahmane ULg et al

in World Journal of Gastroenterology (2012), 18(33), 4491-506

The renewed interest in donation after cardio-circulatory death (DCD) started in the 1990s following the limited success of the transplant community to expand the donation after brain-death (DBD) organ ... [more ▼]

The renewed interest in donation after cardio-circulatory death (DCD) started in the 1990s following the limited success of the transplant community to expand the donation after brain-death (DBD) organ supply and following the request of potential DCD families. Since then, DCD organ procurement and transplantation activities have rapidly expanded, particularly for non-vital organs, like kidneys. In liver transplantation (LT), DCD donors are a valuable organ source that helps to decrease the mortality rate on the waiting lists and to increase the availability of organs for transplantation despite a higher risk of early graft dysfunction, more frequent vascular and ischemia-type biliary lesions, higher rates of re-listing and re-transplantation and lower graft survival, which are obviously due to the inevitable warm ischemia occurring during the declaration of death and organ retrieval process. Experimental strategies intervening in both donors and recipients at different phases of the transplantation process have focused on the attenuation of ischemia-reperfusion injury and already gained encouraging results, and some of them have found their way from pre-clinical success into clinical reality. The future of DCD-LT is promising. Concerted efforts should concentrate on the identification of suitable donors (probably Maastricht category III DCD donors), better donor and recipient matching (high risk donors to low risk recipients), use of advanced organ preservation techniques (oxygenated hypothermic machine perfusion, normothermic machine perfusion, venous systemic oxygen persufflation), and pharmacological modulation (probably a multi-factorial biologic modulation strategy) so that DCD liver allografts could be safely utilized and attain equivalent results as DBD-LT. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 21 (5 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailImpact of medical therapies on inflammatory bowel disease complication rate.
REENAERS, Catherine ULg; Belaiche, Jacques ULg; Louis, Edouard ULg

in World Journal of Gastroenterology (2012), 18(29), 3823-7

Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis are progressive diseases associated with a high risk of complications over time including strictures, fistulae, perianal complications, surgery, and colorectal ... [more ▼]

Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis are progressive diseases associated with a high risk of complications over time including strictures, fistulae, perianal complications, surgery, and colorectal cancer. Changing the natural history and avoiding evolution to a disabling disease should be the main goal of treatment. In recent studies, mucosal healing has been associated with longer-term remission and fewer complications. Conventional therapies with immunosuppressive drugs are able to induce mucosal healing in a minority of cases but their impact on disease progression appears modest. Higher rates of mucosal healing can be achieved with anti-tumor necrosis factor therapies that reduce the risk of relapse, surgery and hospitalization, and are associated with perianal fistulae closure. These drugs might be able to change the natural history of the disease mainly when introduced early in the course of the disease. Treatment strategy in inflammatory bowel diseases should thus be tailored according to the risk that each patient could develop disabling disease. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 13 (0 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailPathophysiology and prevention of postoperative peritoneal adhesions.
Arung, Willy; Meurisse, Michel ULg; DETRY, Olivier ULg

in World Journal of Gastroenterology (2011), 17(41), 4545-53

Peritoneal adhesions represent an important clinical challenge in gastrointestinal surgery. Peritoneal adhesions are a consequence of peritoneal irritation by infection or surgical trauma, and may be ... [more ▼]

Peritoneal adhesions represent an important clinical challenge in gastrointestinal surgery. Peritoneal adhesions are a consequence of peritoneal irritation by infection or surgical trauma, and may be considered as the pathological part of healing following any peritoneal injury, particularly due to abdominal surgery. The balance between fibrin deposition and degradation is critical in determining normal peritoneal healing or adhesion formation. Postoperative peritoneal adhesions are a major cause of morbidity resulting in multiple complications, many of which may manifest several years after the initial surgical procedure. In addition to acute small bowel obstruction, peritoneal adhesions may cause pelvic or abdominal pain, and infertility. In this paper, the authors reviewed the epidemiology, pathogenesis and various prevention strategies of adhesion formation, using Medline and PubMed search. Several preventive agents against postoperative peritoneal adhesions have been investigated. Their role aims in activating fibrinolysis, hampering coagulation, diminishing the inflammatory response, inhibiting collagen synthesis or creating a barrier between adjacent wound surfaces. Their results are encouraging but most of them are contradictory and achieved mostly in animal model. Until additional findings from future clinical researches, only a meticulous surgery can be recommended to reduce unnecessary morbidity and mortality rates from these untoward effects of surgery. In the current state of knowledge, pre-clinical or clinical studies are still necessary to evaluate the effectiveness of the several proposed prevention strategies of postoperative peritoneal adhesions. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 34 (2 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailDo clinical factors help to predict disease course in inflammatory bowel disease?
Louis, Edouard ULg; Belaiche, Jacques ULg; Reenaers, Catherine ULg

in World Journal of Gastroenterology (2010), 16(21), 2600-3

While therapeutic strategies able to change the natural history of the disease are developing, it is of major importance to have available predictive factors for aggressive disease to try and target these ... [more ▼]

While therapeutic strategies able to change the natural history of the disease are developing, it is of major importance to have available predictive factors for aggressive disease to try and target these therapeutic strategies. Clinical predictors have probably been the most broadly studied. In both Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC), age at diagnosis, disease location and smoking habit are currently the strongest predictors of disease course. A younger age at onset is associated with more aggressive disease both in CD and UC. Disease location in CD is associated with different types of complications: surgery and recurrence in upper gastrointestinal and proximal small bowel disease; and surgery in distal small bowel disease and peri-anal lesions in rectal disease. In UC, extensive colitis is clearly been associated with more severe disease. Finally, active smoking globally increases disease severity in CD but decreases it in UC. Besides these important factors, others may predispose to some specific disease evolution and complications, and are also reviewed in the present paper. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 28 (6 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailGuillain-Barré syndrome following hepatitis E
Loly, Jean-Philippe ULg; Rikir, Estelle ULg; Seivert, Maxime ULg et al

in World Journal of Gastroenterology (2009), 15(13), 1645-1647

Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) is often triggered by a preceding bacterial or viral infection. Occasionally, it has been observed in association with acute hepatitis A, B and C, and three cases have been ... [more ▼]

Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) is often triggered by a preceding bacterial or viral infection. Occasionally, it has been observed in association with acute hepatitis A, B and C, and three cases have been previously described in India in which GBS was associated with acute hepatitis E. A molecular mimicry mechanism is supposed to be involved in the pathogenesis of GBS triggered by infectious agents, although the nature of the shared epitopes has not been characterized in most instances, including that in the case of hepatotropic viruses. We report a case of GBS following acute hepatitis E in a European individual. The presence of antiganglioside GM2 antibodies in this patient suggested molecular mimicry involving ganglioside GM2 in the pathogenesis of GBS associated with hepatitis E. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 60 (7 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailChronic hepatitis C infection in a patient with bone marrow hypoplasia.
Bethlen, S.; Chandrikakumari, Kavitha; de Leval, Laurence ULg et al

in World Journal of Gastroenterology (2008), 14(26), 4238-40

Chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is associated with multifarious extra-hepatic manifestations; the most described and discussed being mixed cryoglobulinemia which is strongly related to B-cell ... [more ▼]

Chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is associated with multifarious extra-hepatic manifestations; the most described and discussed being mixed cryoglobulinemia which is strongly related to B-cell lymphoproliferative disorders (LPDs). We present a case of chronic HCV infection and mixed cryoglobulinemia, with minimal liver involvement. The case is a 53-year-old patient who was diagnosed as having bone marrow hypoplasia at the age of three. She received several blood transfusions to normalize her haemoglobin. At the age of 31, she was diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis on account of her diffuse joint pain and inflammation, elevated rheumatoid factor (RF) and Raynaud's phenomenon. Twenty years later, monoclonal gammopathy of IgG Lambda (one year later, changed to IgM Kappa) was detected during a routine examination. A bone marrow biopsy showed hypoplasia, Kappa positive B-lymphocytes and low-grade malignant lymphoma cells. PCR of the bone marrow aspirate was not contributory. No treatment was initiated owing to her poor bone marrow function and she is under regular follow-up. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 51 (6 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailAre we giving biologics too much time? When should we stop treatment?
Louis, Edouard ULg; Reenaers, Catherine ULg; Belaiche, Jacques ULg

in World Journal of Gastroenterology (2008), 14

Detailed reference viewed: 17 (4 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailCadaveric liver transplantation for non-acetaminophen fulminant hepatic failure: A 20-year experience
Detry, Olivier ULg; De Roover, Arnaud ULg; Coimbra Marques, Carla ULg et al

in World Journal of Gastroenterology (2007), 13(9), 1427-1430

AIM: To investigate the long-term results of liver transplantation (LT) for non-acetaminophen fulminant hepatic failure (FHF). METHODS: Over a 20-year period, 29 FHF patients underwent cadaveric whole LT ... [more ▼]

AIM: To investigate the long-term results of liver transplantation (LT) for non-acetaminophen fulminant hepatic failure (FHF). METHODS: Over a 20-year period, 29 FHF patients underwent cadaveric whole LT. Most frequent causes of FHF were hepatitis B virus and drug-related (not acetaminophen) liver failure. All surviving patients were regularly controlled at the out-patient clinic and none was lost to follow-up. Mean follow-up was 101 mo. RESULTS: One month, one-, five- and ten-year patient survival was 79%, 72%, 68% and 68%, respectively. One month, one-, five- and ten-year graft survival was 69%, 65%, 51% and 38%, respectively. Six patients needed early (< 2 mo) retransplantation, four for primary non-function, one for early acute refractory rejection because of ABO blood group incompatibility, and one for a malignant tumor found in the donor. Two patients with hepatitis B FHF developed cerebral lesions peri-transplantion: One developed irreversible and extensive brain damage leading to death, and one suffered from deep deficits leading to continuous medical care in a specialized institution. CONCLUSION: Long-term outcome of patients transplanted for non-acetaminophen FHF may be excellent. As the quality of life of these patients is also particularly good, LT for FHF is clearly justified, despite lower graft survival compared with LT for other liver diseases. (C) 2007 The WJG Press. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 79 (21 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailBrain edema and intracranial hypertension in fulminant hepatic failure: Pathophysiology and management
Detry, Olivier ULg; De Roover, Arnaud ULg; Honore, Pierre ULg et al

in World Journal of Gastroenterology (2006), 12(46), 7405-7412

Intracranial hypertension is a major cause of morbidity and mortality of patients suffering from fulminant hepatic failure. The etiology of this intracranial hypertension is not fully determined, and is ... [more ▼]

Intracranial hypertension is a major cause of morbidity and mortality of patients suffering from fulminant hepatic failure. The etiology of this intracranial hypertension is not fully determined, and is probably multifactorial, combining a cytotoxic brain edema due to the astrocytic accumulation of glutamine, and an increase in cerebral blood volume and cerebral blood flow, in part due to inflammation, to glutamine and to toxic products of the diseased liver. Validated methods to control intracranial hypertension in fulminant hepatic failure patients mainly include mannitol, hypertonic saline, indomethacin, thiopental, and hyperventilation. However all these measures are often not sufficient in absence of liver transplantation, the only curative treatment of intracranial hypertension in fulminant hepatic failure to date. Induced moderate hypothermia seems very promising in this setting, but has to be validated by a controlled, randomized study. Artificial liver support systems have been under investigation for many decades. The bioartificial liver, based on both detoxification and swine liver cells, has shown some efficacy on reduction of intracranial pressure but did not show survival benefit in a controlled, randomized study. The Molecular Adsorbents Recirculating System has shown some efficacy in decreasing intracranial pressure in an animal model of liver failure, but has still to be evaluated in a phase Ill trial. (c) 2006 The WJG Press. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 260 (10 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailCarcinoid tumor of the appendix: A consecutive series from 1237 appendectomies
Tchana-Sato, Vincent ULg; Detry, Olivier ULg; Polus, Marc ULg et al

in World Journal of Gastroenterology (2006), 12(41), 6699-6701

AIM: To report the experience of the CHU Sart Tilman, University of Liege, Belgium, in the management of appendiceal carinoid tumor. METHODS: A retrospective review of 1237 appendectomies performed in one ... [more ▼]

AIM: To report the experience of the CHU Sart Tilman, University of Liege, Belgium, in the management of appendiceal carinoid tumor. METHODS: A retrospective review of 1237 appendectomies performed in one single centre from January 2000 to May 2004, was undertaken. Analysis of demographic data, clinical presentation, histopathology, operative reports and outcome was presented. RESULTS: Among the 1237 appendectomies, 5 appendiceal carcinoid tumors were identified (0.4%) in 4 male and 1 female patients, with a mean age of 29.2 years (range: 6-82 years). Acute appendicitis was the clinical presentation for all patients. Four patients underwent open appendectomy and one a laparoscopic procedure. One patient was reoperated to complete the excision of mesoappendix. All tumors were located at the tip of the appendix with a mean diameter of 0.6 cm (range: 0.3-1.0 cm). No adjuvant therapy was performed. All patients were alive and disease-free during a mean follow-up of 33 mo. CONCLUSION: Appendiceal carcinoid tumor most often presents as appendicitis. In most cases, it is found incidentally during appendectomies and its diagnosis is rarely suspected before histological examination. Appendiceal carcinoid tumor can be managed by simple appendectomy and resection of the mesoappendix, if its size is <= 1 cm. (C) 2006 The WJG Press. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 226 (14 ULg)