References of "Water, Air & Soil Pollution"
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See detailBiodegradation of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in Mangrove Sediments Under Different Strategies: Natural Attenuation, Biostimulation, and Bioaugmentation with Rhodococcus erythropolis T902.1
Semboung Lang, Firmin ULiege; Destain, Jacqueline ULiege; Delvigne, Frank ULiege et al

in Water, Air & Soil Pollution (2016)

Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are pollutants that occur in mangrove sediments. Their removal by bacteria often depends on specific characteristics as the number of benzene rings they possess and ... [more ▼]

Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are pollutants that occur in mangrove sediments. Their removal by bacteria often depends on specific characteristics as the number of benzene rings they possess and their solubility. Their removal also depends on environmental factors, such as pH, temperature, oxygen, and the ability of the endogenous or exogenous microflora to metabolize hydrocarbons.With the aim of treating mangrove sediments polluted by hydrocarbons in a biological way, a biodegradation experiment was conducted using mangrove sediments artificially contaminated with a mixture of four PAHs. The study used Rhodococcus erythropolis as an exogenous bacterial strain in order to assess the biodegradation of the PAH mixture by natural attenuation, biostimulation, bioaugmentation, and a combination of biostimulation and bioaugmentation. The results showed that the last three treatments were more efficient than natural attenuation. The biostimulation/bioaugmentation combination proved to be the most effective PAH degradation treatment. [less ▲]

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See detailCharacterization and Evaluation of the Potential of a Diesel-Degrading Bacterial Consortium Isolated from Fresh Mangrove Sediment
Semboung Lang, Firmin ULiege; Destain, Jacqueline ULiege; Delvigne, Frank ULiege et al

in Water, Air & Soil Pollution (2016)

Hydrocarbons are ubiquitous and persistent organic pollutants in the environment. In wetlands and marine environments, particularly in mangrove ecosystems, their increase and significant accumulation ... [more ▼]

Hydrocarbons are ubiquitous and persistent organic pollutants in the environment. In wetlands and marine environments, particularly in mangrove ecosystems, their increase and significant accumulation result from human activities such as oil and gas exploration and exploitation operations. Remediation of these ecosystems requires the development of adequate and effective strategies. Natural attenuation, biostimulation, and bioaugmentation are all biological soil treatment techniques that can be adapted to mangroves. Our experiments were performed on samples of fresh mangrove sediments from the Cameroon estuary and mainly from the Wouri River in Cameroon. This study aims to assess the degradation potential of a bacterial consortium isolated from mangrove sediment. The principle of our bioremediation experiments is based on a series of tests designed to evaluate the potential of an active indigenous microflora and three exogenous pure strains, to degrade diesel with/without adding nutrients. The experiments were conducted in laboratory flasks and a greenhouse in microcosms. In one case, as in the other, the endogenous microflora showed that it was able to degrade diesel. Under stress of the pollutant, the endogenous microflora fits well enough in the middle to enable metabolism of the pollutant. However, the Rhodococcus strain was more effective over time. The degradation rate was 77 and 90%in the vials containing the sterile sediments and non-sterile sediments, respectively. The results are comparable with those obtained in the microcosms in a greenhouse where only the endogenous microflora were used. The results of this study show that mangrove sediment contains an active microflora that can metabolize diesel. Indigenous and active microflora show an interesting potential for diesel degradation. [less ▲]

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See detailCharacterization and Evaluation of the Potential of a Diesel-Degrading Bacterial Consortium Isolated from Fresh Mangrove Sediment
Lang, Firmin Semboung; Destain, Jacqueline ULiege; Delvigne, Frank ULiege et al

in Water, Air & Soil Pollution (2016), 227(2), 1-20

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See detailBiodegradation of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in Mangrove Sediments Under Different Strategies: Natural Attenuation, Biostimulation, and Bioaugmentation with Rhodococcus erythropolis T902.1
Lang, F. S.; Destain, Jacqueline ULiege; Delvigne, Frank ULiege et al

in Water, Air & Soil Pollution (2016), 227(9),

Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are pollutants that occur in mangrove sediments. Their removal by bacteria often depends on specific characteristics as the number of benzene rings they possess and ... [more ▼]

Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are pollutants that occur in mangrove sediments. Their removal by bacteria often depends on specific characteristics as the number of benzene rings they possess and their solubility. Their removal also depends on environmental factors, such as pH, temperature, oxygen, and the ability of the endogenous or exogenous microflora to metabolize hydrocarbons. With the aim of treating mangrove sediments polluted by hydrocarbons in a biological way, a biodegradation experiment was conducted using mangrove sediments artificially contaminated with a mixture of four PAHs. The study used Rhodococcus erythropolis as an exogenous bacterial strain in order to assess the biodegradation of the PAH mixture by natural attenuation, biostimulation, bioaugmentation, and a combination of biostimulation and bioaugmentation. The results showed that the last three treatments were more efficient than natural attenuation. The biostimulation/bioaugmentation combination proved to be the most effective PAH degradation treatment. © 2016, Springer International Publishing Switzerland. [less ▲]

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See detailThe Air Quality in African Rural Environments. Preliminary Implications for Health: The Case of Respiratory Disease in the Northern Benin
De Longueville, Florence ULiege; Hountondji, Yvon; Ozer, Pierre ULiege et al

in Water, Air & Soil Pollution (2014)

Recently, the World Health Organization’s International Association for Research on Cancer classified outdoor air pollution as carcinogenic to humans and puts air pollution in the same category as tobacco ... [more ▼]

Recently, the World Health Organization’s International Association for Research on Cancer classified outdoor air pollution as carcinogenic to humans and puts air pollution in the same category as tobacco smoke, UV radiation, and plutonium. The ambient air is polluted by emissions from motor vehicles, industrial processes, power generation, household combustion of solid fuel, and other sources. Dust storms lead to particulate levels that exceed internationally recommended levels, especially near the Sahara. However, this source of air pollution appears to be under-studied, particularly in the literature devoted to human health impacts in West Africa. More than 50 % of the total dust emitted into the atmosphere comes from the Sahara. These aerosols contribute to increase the concentrations of particles smaller than 10 μm (PM10), which are breathable particles. This study is the first designed to assess the real impact of Saharan dust on air quality and respiratory health of children in a region of West Africa. Dust events having affected the Northern Benin during the dry seasons between 2003 and 2007 were determined. The analyzed health data are the monthly rates of acute lower respiratory infections (ALRI). Over the entire study period, 61 days of dust events were observed in the region. They recorded on average a daily PM10 concentration of 1017 μg m−3, more than 18 times higher than that calculated on all days without dust events. The study also highlighted a mean increase of 12.5 % of ALRI rates during the months recording dust events. The use of daily health data should help to refine these initial results in the future. [less ▲]

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See detailEstimation of air quality degradation due to Saharan dust at Nouakchott, Mauritania, from horizontal visibility data
Ozer, Pierre ULiege; Laghdaf, MBOM; Lemine, S. O. M. et al

in Water, Air & Soil Pollution (2007), 178(1-4), 79-87

It is now irrefutable that air pollution caused by large amounts of Total Suspended Particulates (TSP) and respiratory particulates or Particulate Matter less than 10 mu m in aerodynamic diameter (PM10 ... [more ▼]

It is now irrefutable that air pollution caused by large amounts of Total Suspended Particulates (TSP) and respiratory particulates or Particulate Matter less than 10 mu m in aerodynamic diameter (PM10) has numerous undesired consequences on human health. Air quality degradation far from the African continent, in the US and in Europe, caused by high concentrations of African dust, is seen as a major threat even though most of these countries are very distant from the Sahara. Surprisingly, no estimates of TSP or PM10 levels near the Saharan dust source are available. Based on horizontal visibility observations which are reduced by the presence of dust in the atmosphere, TSP and PM10 levels are estimated throughout the year 2000 at Nouakchott-Airport, Mauritania, using relations found in the literature. It appears that concentrations of particles are significant both in terms magnitude and frequency, as the 24-hour PM10 thresholds established by the US EPA National Ambient Air Quality Standards and the EU Limits Values for Air Quality were exceeded 86 and 137 times, respectively. The average annual concentration is far above air quality standards and estimated at 159 mu g m(-3) for TSP and 108 mu g m(-3) for PM10. These very high particulate levels are likely to represent an important public health hazard and should be considered as a major environmental risk. [less ▲]

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See detailImpacts of (NH4)2SO4 deposition on Norway spruce (Picea abies [L.] Karst) roots
Carnol, Monique ULiege; Cudlin, Pavel; Ineson, Phil

in Water, Air & Soil Pollution (1999), 116

The effects of enhanced (NH4)(2)SO4 (NS) deposition on Norway spruce (Picea abies [L.] Karst) fine root biomass, vitality and chemistry were investigated using root-free in-growth cores reproducing native ... [more ▼]

The effects of enhanced (NH4)(2)SO4 (NS) deposition on Norway spruce (Picea abies [L.] Karst) fine root biomass, vitality and chemistry were investigated using root-free in-growth cores reproducing native organic and mineral soil horizons. The cores were covered and watered every 2 weeks with native throughfall or throughfall supplemented with NS to increase deposition by 75 kg ha(-1) a(-1) NH4+-N (86 kg ha(-1) a(-1) SO42--S). The in-growth cores were sampled after 19 months and assessed for root biomass, necromass, length, tip number, tip vitality and fine root chemistry. Root biomass and fine root aluminium (Al) concentration were negatively correlated, but NS deposition had no effect on root growth or root tip vitality. NS deposition caused increased fine root nitrogen (N) concentrations in the organic horizon and increased Calcium (Ca) concentrations in the mineral horizon. Fine root biomass was higher in the organic horizon, where fine root Al and potassium (K) concentrations were lower and Ca concentrations higher than in the mineral horizon. Results highlighted the importance of soil stratification on fine root growth and chemical composition. [less ▲]

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See detailNUTRITIONAL-STATUS OF DECLINING SPRUCE (PICEA-ABIES (L) KARST) - EFFECT OF SOIL ORGANIC-MATTER TURNOVER RATE
Hambuckers, Alain ULiege; Remacle, Jean ULiege

in Water, Air & Soil Pollution (1991), 59(1-2), 95-106

Foliar analysis was undertaken in two plots of Picea abies (L.) Karst., located in a watershed of Haute Ardenne, Belgium, in order to estimate the decline of the trees. Apart from a general Mg deficiency ... [more ▼]

Foliar analysis was undertaken in two plots of Picea abies (L.) Karst., located in a watershed of Haute Ardenne, Belgium, in order to estimate the decline of the trees. Apart from a general Mg deficiency, the concentrations of the needles were in the same range as those determined in other European stands. Comparisons between healthy and declining trees within each plot revealed a general pattern of decline similar to that observed elsewhere in Western Europe. This was shown as lower Ca, Mg, Zn concentrations and water content and higher N and P concentrations of the needles collected from declining trees. It is concluded that this decline could be due to N over fertilization by the atmospheric deposition. The difference of decline between the two plots was attributed to the turnover rate of the soil organic layer which was less intensive in the most damaged plot. [less ▲]

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