References of "Veterinary and Comparative Orthopaedics and Traumatology"
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See detailAssessment of a computed tomography guided injection technique of the lumbo-sacral disc in sheep.
Neveu, Fabienne ULiege; Vandeweerd, Jean-Michel; Kirschvink, Nathalie et al

in Veterinary and Comparative Orthopaedics and Traumatology (2016), 29(2), 136-141

OBJECTIVES: Recent data indicate that degeneration of intervertebral discs occurs naturally in sheep, with a higher prevalence at the level of the lumbo-sacral disc. The objective of this ex vivo study ... [more ▼]

OBJECTIVES: Recent data indicate that degeneration of intervertebral discs occurs naturally in sheep, with a higher prevalence at the level of the lumbo-sacral disc. The objective of this ex vivo study was to evaluate a computed tomography (CT) guided method of injection into the ovine lumbo-sacral disc. METHODS: Six euthanatized sheep were used for identification of the approach plane, the optimal direction of the needle and the mean distance from skin to disc. Dissection after injection of coloured ink was used to determine the anatomical structures that were penetrated. In seven other animals, all spines were assessed beforehand by CT and magnetic resonance imaging to determine whether disc pathology was present. The final position of the needle was assessed by CT to determine the accuracy of the technique. Contrast agent was injected to identify any problems associated with administration of liquid into the disc. RESULTS: The CT guided injection technique was easy to perform and enabled adequate positioning of the needle into all (n = 7) lumbo-sacral discs. Distance between the skin and the disc ranged between 12 and 17 cm. No organ, vascular or nervous structure was penetrated and the needle path remained intramuscular without penetration of the peritoneal cavity. Contrast medium leaked out through three degenerate discs. CLINICAL SIGNIFICANCE: The current study described a consistently safe and accurate CT guided injection technique to the lumbo-sacral disc for future in vivo experimental studies that will use sheep as animal model for human intervertebral disc disease disease. [less ▲]

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See detailRandomized, Double-Blinded, Controlled Clinical Trial Evaluating the Efficacy of a Diet Supplemented with Curcuminoids Extract, Hydrolysed Collagen and Green Tea Extract in Dogs with Osteoarthritis
Barthélémy, Nicolas; Comblain, Fanny ULiege; Lesponne, Isabelle et al

in Veterinary and Comparative Orthopaedics and Traumatology (2016)

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See detailBiomechanical testing of -tricalcium phosphate wedge for advancement of the tibial tuberosity
Etchepareborde, S.; Barthelemy, Nicolas ULiege; Brunel, L. et al

in Veterinary and Comparative Orthopaedics and Traumatology (2014), 27(1), 14-19

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See detailTheoretical discrepancy between cage size and efficient tibial tuberosity advancement in dogs treated for cranial cruciate ligament rupture
Etchepareborde, Sébastien ULiege; Mills; Busoni, Valeria ULiege et al

in Veterinary and Comparative Orthopaedics and Traumatology (2011), 24

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See detailPreliminary experience of a modified Maquet technique for repair of cranial cruciate ligament rupture in dogs
Etchepareborde, Sébastien; Brunel, Laurencie ULiege; Bolen, Géraldine ULiege et al

in Veterinary and Comparative Orthopaedics and Traumatology (2011)

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See detailMechanical testing of a modified stabilisation method for tibial tuberosity advancement
Etchepareborde, Sébastien; Barthelemy, Nicolas; Mills, J. et al

in Veterinary and Comparative Orthopaedics and Traumatology (2010)

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See detailRadiographic features of the dorsal condylar sagittal ridge of the third metacarpal and metatarsal bones in young Warmblood stallions.
Hauspie, S.; Martens, A.; Declercq, J. et al

in Veterinary and Comparative Orthopaedics and Traumatology (2010), 23(6), 411-416

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See detailChondrogenic potential of mesenchymal stromal cells derived from equine bone marrow and umbilical cord blood.
Berg, Luc ULiege; Koch, T.; Heerkens, T. et al

in Veterinary and Comparative Orthopaedics and Traumatology (2009), 22(5), 363-70

OBJECTIVE: Orthopaedic injury is the most common cause of lost training days or premature retirement in the equine athlete. Cell-based therapies are a potential new treatment option in musculo-skeletal ... [more ▼]

OBJECTIVE: Orthopaedic injury is the most common cause of lost training days or premature retirement in the equine athlete. Cell-based therapies are a potential new treatment option in musculo-skeletal diseases. Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) have been derived from multiple sources in the horse including bone marrow and umbilical cord blood. The objective of this study was to provide an in vitro comparison of the chondrogenic potential in MSC derived from adult bone marrow (BM-MSC) and umbilical cord blood (CB-MSC). RESULTS: MSC from both sources produced tissue with cartilage-like morphology that stained positive for proteoglycans and expressed cartilage markers. The CB-MSC pellets were larger and showed hyaline-like cartilage morphology as early as day six. Gene expression of collagen type 21, aggrecan and CD-RAP was higher in CB- than BM-MSC pellets. Expression of Sox9 mRNA was similar between CB- and BM-MSC pellets. Protein concentration of cartilage-derived retinoic acid sensitive protein was higher in culture medium from CB- than BM-MSC pellets. CONCLUSION: CB-MSC and BM-MSC were both capable of producing hyaline-like cartilage in vitro . However, in this study the MSC from umbilical cord blood appeared to have more chondrogenic potential than the BM-MSC based on the cells tested and parameters measured. [less ▲]

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See detailThird metacarpal bone mineral density assessment in the standing horse by dual X-ray absorptiometry - Suitability, precision and accuracy
Donabedian, M.; Delguste, Catherine ULiege; Perona, G. et al

in Veterinary and Comparative Orthopaedics and Traumatology (2005), 18(1), 26-30

Bone mineral density (BMD) is correlated to mechanical properties of bone. In the horse, dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) has yet only been performed ex-vivo, but a new portable DXA device would be ... [more ▼]

Bone mineral density (BMD) is correlated to mechanical properties of bone. In the horse, dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) has yet only been performed ex-vivo, but a new portable DXA device would be ideal for in-vivo BMD measurement. We explored field suitability, precision and accuracy of this device for in-vivo third metacarpal density assessment. Precision was analysed by calculating measurement variation under repeated measurement tests with (reproducibility) and without (repeatability) limb repositioning. Repeatability and reproducibility were tested ex-vivo, at the some time that intra- and inter-operator reproducibility were assessed in-vivo. In order to test accuracy, bone mineral content (BMC) of several bone samples determined by DXA and ashing were compared. Repeatability was 1.47% and reproducibility 1.69% ex-vivo. In-vivo reproducibility varied between 2.91 and 4.06% for intraoperator test and between 3.13 and 5.53% for interoperator test. BMC measured by DXA and ash weight were highly correlated (R-2 > 0.99). In conclusion, under described conditions this DXA device is usable, accurate and precise. Its sensitiveness reaches 8.23% in an individual longitudinal monitoring. Using the third metacarpal bone as an example, we have shown that this device is suitable for experimental or clinical monitoring. [less ▲]

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