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See detailThe Innate Immune Response of Equine Bronchial Epithelial Cells is Altered by Training
Frellstedt, Linda ULg; Gosset, Philippe; Kervoaze, Gwenola et al

in Veterinary Research (2015), 46(3), 1-12

Respiratory diseases, including inflammatory airway disease (IAD), viral and bacterial infections, are common problems in exercising horses. The airway epithelium constitutes a major physical barrier ... [more ▼]

Respiratory diseases, including inflammatory airway disease (IAD), viral and bacterial infections, are common problems in exercising horses. The airway epithelium constitutes a major physical barrier against airborne infections and plays an essential role in the lung innate immune response mainly through toll-like receptor (TLR) activation. The aim of this study was to develop a model for the culture of equine bronchial epithelial cells (EBEC) in vitro and to explore EBEC innate immune responses in trained horses. Bronchial epithelial biopsies were taken from 6 adult horses during lower airway endoscopy. EBEC were grown in vitro by an explant method. The innate immune response of EBEC was evaluated in vitro by treatment with TLR ligands. TLR3 is the most strongly expressed TLR at the mRNA level in EBEC and stimulation of EBEC with Poly(I:C), an analog of viral dsRNA, triggers a strong secretion of IFN-β, TNF-α, IL-6 and CXCL8. We further evaluated the EBEC innate immune response in horses that underwent a 4-month-training program. While training had no effect on TLR mRNA expression in EBEC as well as in bronchial biopsies, it increased the production of IFN-β after stimulation with a TLR3 ligand and decreased the secretion of TNF-α and IL-6 after stimulation with a TLR2 and TLR3 ligand. These findings may be implicated in the increased risk for viral and bacterial infections observed in sport horses. Altogether, we report a successful model for the culture of EBEC that can be applied to the investigation of pathophysiologic conditions in longitudinal studies. [less ▲]

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See detailThe IL-10 homologue encoded by cyprinid herpesvirus 3 is essential neither for viral replication in vitro nor for virulence in vivo
Ouyang, Ping ULg; Rakus, Krzysztof ULg; Boutier, Maxime ULg et al

in Veterinary Research (2013)

Cyprinid herpesvirus 3 (CyHV-3), a member of the family Alloherpesviridae, is the causative agent of a lethal disease in common and koi carp. CyHV-3 ORF134 encodes an interleukin-10 (IL-10) homologue. The ... [more ▼]

Cyprinid herpesvirus 3 (CyHV-3), a member of the family Alloherpesviridae, is the causative agent of a lethal disease in common and koi carp. CyHV-3 ORF134 encodes an interleukin-10 (IL-10) homologue. The present study was devoted to this ORF. Transcriptomic analyses revealed that ORF134 is expressed as a spliced gene belonging to the early-late class. Proteomic analyses of CyHV-3 infected cell supernatant demonstrated that the ORF134 expression product is one of the most abundant proteins of the CyHV-3 secretome. To investigate the role of ORF134 in viral replication in vitro and in virulence in vivo, a deleted strain and a derived revertant strain were produced using BAC cloning technologies. The recombinant ORF134 deleted strain replicated in vitro comparably to the parental and the revertant strains. Infection of fish by immersion in water containing the virus induced comparable CyHV-3 disease for the three virus genotypes tested (wild type, deleted and revertant). Quantification of viral DNA by real time TaqMan PCR (in the gills and the kidney) and analysis of carp cytokine expression (in the spleen) by RT-qPCR at different times post-infection did not revealed any significant difference between the groups of fish infected with the three virus genotypes. Similarly, histological examination of the gills and the kidney of infected fish revealed no significant differences between fish infected with ORF134 deleted virus versus fish infected with the control parental or revertant strains. All together, the results of the present study demonstrate that the IL-10 homologue encoded by CyHV-3 is essential neither for viral replication in vitro nor for virulence in common carp. [less ▲]

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See detailCyprinid herpesvirus 3 : an intersting virus for applied and fundamental research
Rakus; Ouyang, Ping; Boutier, Maxime ULg et al

in Veterinary Research (2013), 44

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See detailZoonoses in Pet 1 birds: review and perspectives
Boseret, Géraldine ULg; Losson, Bertrand ULg; Mainil, Jacques ULg et al

in Veterinary Research (2013)

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See detailFluorescent tagging of VP22 in N-terminus reveals that VP22 favors Marek’s disease virus (MDV) virulence in chickens and allows morphogenesis study in MD tumor cells
Remy, Sylvie; Blondeau, Caroline ULg; Le Vern, Yves et al

in Veterinary Research (2013)

Marek’s disease virus (MDV) is an alpha-herpesvirus causing Marek’s disease in chickens, mostly associated with T-cell lymphoma. VP22 is a tegument protein abundantly expressed in cells during the lytic ... [more ▼]

Marek’s disease virus (MDV) is an alpha-herpesvirus causing Marek’s disease in chickens, mostly associated with T-cell lymphoma. VP22 is a tegument protein abundantly expressed in cells during the lytic cycle, which is essential for MDV spread in culture. Our aim was to generate a pathogenic MDV expressing a green fluorescent protein (EGFP) fused to the N-terminus of VP22 to better decipher the role of VP22 in vivo and monitor MDV morphogenesis in tumors cells. In culture, rRB-1B EGFP22 led to 1.6-fold smaller plaques than the parental virus. In chickens, the rRB-1B EGFP22 virus was impaired in its ability to induce lymphoma and to spread in contact birds. The MDV genome copy number in blood and feathers during the time course of infection indicated that rRB-1B EGFP22 reached its two major target cells, but had a growth defect in these two tissues. Therefore, the integrity of VP22 is critical for an efficient replication in vivo, for tumor formation and horizontal transmission. An examination of EGFP fluorescence in rRB-1B EGFP22-induced tumors showed that about 0.1% of the cells were in lytic phase. EGFP-positive tumor cells were selected by cytometry and analyzed for MDV morphogenesis by transmission electron microscopy. Only few particles were present per cell, and all types of virions (except mature enveloped virions) were detected unequivocally inside tumor lymphoid cells. These results indicate that MDV morphogenesis in tumor cells is more similar to the morphorgenesis in fibroblastic cells in culture, albeit poorly efficient, than in feather follicle epithelial cells [less ▲]

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See detailFeeding Cyprinus carpio with infectious materials mediates cyprinid herpesvirus 3 entry through infection of pharyngeal periodontal mucosa
Fournier, Guillaume ULg; Boutier, Maxime ULg; Victor, Stalin Raj et al

in Veterinary Research (2012), 43(6),

Cyprinid herpesvirus 3 (CyHV-3), also known as Koi herpesvirus, is the etiological agent of a mortal disease in common and koi carp. Recently, we investigated the entry of CyHV-3 in carp using ... [more ▼]

Cyprinid herpesvirus 3 (CyHV-3), also known as Koi herpesvirus, is the etiological agent of a mortal disease in common and koi carp. Recently, we investigated the entry of CyHV-3 in carp using bioluminescence imaging and a CyHV-3 recombinant strain expressing luciferase (LUC). We demonstrated that the skin is the major portal of entry after inoculation of carp by immersion in water containing CyHV-3. While this model of infection mimics some natural conditions in which infection takes place, other epidemiological conditions could favour entry of virus through the digestive tract. Here, we investigated whether ingestion of infectious materials mediates CyHV-3 entry through the digestive tract. Carp were fed with materials contaminated with the CyHV-3 LUC recombinant (oral contamination) or immersed in water containing the virus (contamination by immersion). Bioluminescence imaging analyses performed at different times post-infection led to the following observations: (i) the pharyngeal periodontal mucosa is the major portal of entry after oral contamination, while the skin is the major portal of entry after contamination by immersion. (ii) Both modes of inoculation led to the spreading of the infection to the various organs tested. However, the timing and the sequence in which some of the organs turned positive were different between the two modes of inoculation. Finally, we compared the disease induced by the two inoculation modes. They led to comparable clinical signs and mortality rate. The results of the present study suggest that, based on epidemiological conditions, CyHV-3 can enter carp either by skin or periodontal pharyngeal mucosal infection. [less ▲]

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See detailO157:H7 and O104:H4 Vero/Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli outbreaks: respective role of cattle and humans
Piérard, D; De Greve, H; Haesebrouck, F et al

in Veterinary Research (2012), 43

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See detailVariation of inflammatory dynamics and mediators in primiparous cows after intramammary challenge with Escherichia coli.
Pezeshki, Adel; Stordeur, Philippe; Wallemacq, Hugues et al

in Veterinary Research (2011), 42(1), 15

ABSTRACT: The objective of the current study was to investigate (i) the outcome of experimentally induced Escherichia coli mastitis in primiparous cows during early lactation in relation with production ... [more ▼]

ABSTRACT: The objective of the current study was to investigate (i) the outcome of experimentally induced Escherichia coli mastitis in primiparous cows during early lactation in relation with production of eicosanoids and inflammatory indicators, and (ii) the validity of thermography to evaluate temperature changes on udder skin surface after experimentally induced E. coli mastitis. Nine primiparous Holstein Friesian cows were inoculated 24 +/- 6 days (d) after parturition in both left quarters with E. coli P4 serotype O32:H37. Blood and milk samples were collected before and after challenge with E. coli. The infrared images were taken from the caudal view of the udder following challenge with E. coli. No relationship was detected between severity of mastitis and changes of thromboxane B2 (TXB2), leukotriene B4 (LTB4) and lipoxin A4 (LXA4). However, prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) was related to systemic disease severity during E. coli mastitis. Moreover, reduced somatic cell count (SCC), fewer circulating basophils, increased concentration of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and higher milk sodium and lower milk potassium concentrations were related to systemic disease severity. The thermal camera was capable of detecting 2-3 degrees C temperature changes on udder skin surface of cows inoculated with E. coli. Peak of udder skin temperature occurred after peak of rectal temperature and appearance of local signs of induced E. coli mastitis. Although infrared thermography was a successful method for detecting the changes in udder skin surface temperature following intramammary challenge with E. coli, it did not show to be a promising tool for early detection of mastitis. [less ▲]

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See detailA survey of the transmission of infectious diseases/infections between wild and domestic ungulates in Europe
Martin, C.; Pastoret, Paul-Pierre ULg; Brochier, B. et al

in Veterinary Research (2011)

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See detailSkin mucus of Cyprinus carpio inhibits cyprinid herpesvirus 3 binding to epidermal cells
RAJ, Victor; Fournier, Guillaume ULg; Rakus, Krzysztof ULg et al

in Veterinary Research (2011), 42(92),

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See detailMalignant catarrhal fever induced by Alcelaphine herpesvirus 1 is characterized by an expansion of activated CD3+CD8+CD4- T cells expressing a cytotoxic phenotype in both lymphoid and non-lymphoid tissues.
Dewals, Benjamin G ULg; Vanderplasschen, Alain ULg

in Veterinary research (2011), 42(1), 95

ABSTRACT: Alcelaphine herpesvirus 1 (AlHV-1) is carried by wildebeest asymptomatically. It causes a fatal lymphoproliferative disease named wildebeest-derived malignant catarrhal fever (WD-MCF) when cross ... [more ▼]

ABSTRACT: Alcelaphine herpesvirus 1 (AlHV-1) is carried by wildebeest asymptomatically. It causes a fatal lymphoproliferative disease named wildebeest-derived malignant catarrhal fever (WD-MCF) when cross-species transmitted to a variety of susceptible species of the Artiodactyla order. WD-MCF can be reproduced experimentally in rabbits. In a previous report, we demonstrated that WD-MCF induced by AlHV-1 is associated with a severe proliferation of CD8+ T cells in the lymphoid tissues. Here, we further studied the mononuclear leukocytic populations in both the lymphoid (throughout the infection and at time of euthanasia) and non-lymphoid (at time of euthanasia) organs during WD-MCF induced experimentally in rabbits. To reach that goal, we performed multi-colour flow cytometry stainings. The results obtained demonstrate that the development of WD-MCF correlates in peripheral blood with a severe increase of CD8+ cell percentages; and that CD3+CD8+CD4- T cells were the predominant cell type in both lymphoid and non-lymphoid organs at time of euthanasia. Further characterization of the mononuclear leukocytes isolated from both lymphoid and non-lymphoid tissues revealed that the CD8+ T cells express high levels of the activation markers CD25 and CD44, produce high amount of gamma-interferon (IFN-gamma) and perforin, and showed a reduction of interleukin-2 (IL-2) gene expression. These data demonstrate that the development of WD-MCF is associated with the expansion and infiltration of activated and cytotoxic CD3+CD8+CD4- T cells secreting high amount of IFN-gamma but low IL-2. [less ▲]

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See detailIdentification and localization of the structural proteins of anguillid herpesvirus 1
Van Beurden, Steven ULg; Leroy, B; Wattiez, R et al

in Veterinary Research (2011), 42(1), 105

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See detailInterferon-induced Sus scrofa Mx1 blocks endocytic traffic of incoming influenza A virus particles
Palm, Mélanie; Garigliany, Mutien-Marie ULg; Cornet, François ULg et al

in Veterinary Research (2010), 41(3), 29

The interferon-induced Mx proteins of vertebrates are dynamin-like GTPases, some isoforms of which can additionally inhibit the life cycle of certain RNA viruses. Here we show that the porcine Mx1 protein ... [more ▼]

The interferon-induced Mx proteins of vertebrates are dynamin-like GTPases, some isoforms of which can additionally inhibit the life cycle of certain RNA viruses. Here we show that the porcine Mx1 protein (poMx1) inhibits replication of influenza A virus and we attempt to identify the step at which the viral life cycle is blocked. In infected cells expressing poMx1, the level of transcripts encoding the viral nucleoprotein is significantly lower than normal, even when secondary transcription is prevented by exposure to cycloheximide. This reveals that a pretranscriptional block participates to the anti-influenza activity. Binding and internalization of incoming virus particles are normal in the presence of poMx1 but centripetal traffic to the late endosomes is interrupted. Surprisingly but decisively, poMx1 significantly alters binding of early endosome autoantigen 1 to early endosomes and/or early endosome size and spatial distribution. This is compatible with impairment of traffic of the endocytic vesicles to the late endosomes. [less ▲]

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See detailInitial adherence of EPEC, EHEC and VTEC to host cells.
Bardiau, Marjorie ULg; Szalo, Ioan Mihai ULg; Mainil, Jacques ULg

in Veterinary Research (2010), 41(5), 57

Initial adherence to host cells is the first step of the infection of enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC), enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) and verotoxigenic Escherichia coli (VTEC) strains ... [more ▼]

Initial adherence to host cells is the first step of the infection of enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC), enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) and verotoxigenic Escherichia coli (VTEC) strains. The importance of this step in the infection resides in the fact that (1) adherence is the first contact between bacteria and intestinal cells without which the other steps cannot occur and (2) adherence is the basis of host specificity for a lot of pathogens. This review describes the initial adhesins of the EPEC, EHEC and VTEC strains. During the last few years, several new adhesins and putative colonisation factors have been described, especially in EHEC strains. Only a few adhesins (BfpA, AF/R1, AF/R2, Ral, F18 adhesins) appear to be host and pathotype specific. The others are found in more than one species and/or pathotype (EPEC, EHEC, VTEC). Initial adherence of EPEC, EHEC and VTEC strains to host cells is probably mediated by multiple mechanisms. [less ▲]

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See detailCharacterization of pentraxin 3 in the horse and its expression in airways.
Ramery, Eve ULg; Fievez, Laurence ULg; Fraipont, Audrey ULg et al

in Veterinary Research (2010), 41(2), 18

The long pentraxin 3 (PTX3) plays an important role in host defence and its over-expression may contribute to airway injury. The aim of the present study was therefore to characterize in more detail PTX3 ... [more ▼]

The long pentraxin 3 (PTX3) plays an important role in host defence and its over-expression may contribute to airway injury. The aim of the present study was therefore to characterize in more detail PTX3 and its expression in the horses airway. Six healthy horses and six horses affected by recurrent airway obstruction (R.A.O.) were submitted to a dusty environment challenge. PTX3 DNA and cDNA were cloned and sequenced. PTX3 expression was evaluated by RT-qPCR, western blotting and immuno-histochemistry in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) cells, BALF supernatant and bronchial epithelial cells. An alternative splicing of the second exon of PTX3 occurred, resulting in two forms of the protein: spliced (32 kDa) and full length (42 kDa). PTX3 was detected in BALF macrophages, neutrophils and bronchial epithelial cells. It was over-expressed in the BALF supernatant from R.A.O.-affected horses in crisis. However, dust was unable to induce PTX3 in BALF cells ex vivo, indicating that dust is an indirect inducer of PTX3. Dust exposure in-vivo induced PTX3 in BALF macrophages but there was no significant difference between healthy and R.A.O.-affected horses. Conversely, PTX3 was over-expressed in the bronchial epithelial cells from R.A.O-affected horses in crisis. These data indicate a differential regulatory mechanism in inflammatory and bronchial epithelial cells and offer therapeutically interesting perspectives. [less ▲]

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See detailPorcine CD18 mediates Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae ApxIII species-specific toxicity
Vanden bergh, Philippe; Zecchinon, Laurent; Fett, Thomas ULg et al

in Veterinary Research (2009), 40(4), 33

Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae, the causative agent of porcine pleuropneumonia, produces Apx toxins that are recognized as major virulence factors. Recently, we showed that ApxIIIA-cytotoxic activity ... [more ▼]

Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae, the causative agent of porcine pleuropneumonia, produces Apx toxins that are recognized as major virulence factors. Recently, we showed that ApxIIIA-cytotoxic activity specifically targets Sus scrofa leukocytes. Since both LtxA from Aggregatibacter actinomycetem comitans (aggressive periodontitis in humans) and LktA from Mannheimia haemolytica (pneumonia in ruminants) share this characteristic, respectively towards human and ruminant leukocytes, and because both use the CD18 subunit to interact with their respective LFA-1, we hypothesized that ApxIIIA was likely to bind porcine CD18 to exercise its deleterious effects on pig leukocytes. A beta(2)-integrin-deficient ApxIIIA-resistant human erythroleukemic cell line was transfected either with homologous or heterologous CD11a/ CD18 heterodimers using a set of plasmids coding for human (ApxIIIA-resistant), bovine (-resistant) and porcine (-susceptible) CD11a and CD18 subunits. Cell preparations that switched from ApxIIIA-resistance to -susceptibility were then sought to identify the LFA-1 subunit involved. The results showed that the ApxIIIA-resistant recipient cell line was rendered susceptible only if the CD18 partner within the LFA-1 heterodimer was that of the pig. It is concluded that porcine CD18 is necessary to mediate A. pleuropneumoniae ApxIIIA toxin-induced leukolysis. [less ▲]

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See detailClassification of worldwide bovine tuberculosis risk factors in cattle: a stratified approach.
Humblet, Marie-France ULg; Boschiroli, Maria Laura; Saegerman, Claude ULg

in Veterinary Research (2009), 40(5), 50

The worldwide status of bovine tuberculosis (bTB) as a zoonosis remains of great concern. This article reviews the main risk factors for bTB in cattle based on a three-level classification: animal, herd ... [more ▼]

The worldwide status of bovine tuberculosis (bTB) as a zoonosis remains of great concern. This article reviews the main risk factors for bTB in cattle based on a three-level classification: animal, herd and region/country level. A distinction is also made, whenever possible, between situations in developed and developing countries as the difference of context might have consequences in terms of risk of bTB. Recommendations are suggested to animal health professionals and scientists directly involved in the control and prevention of bTB in cattle. The determination of Millennium Development Goals for bTB is proposed to improve the control/eradication of the disease worldwide. [less ▲]

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See detailSequence-optimised E2 constructs from BVDV-1b and BVDV-2 for DNA immunisation in cattle
Couvreur, B.; Letellier, C.; Olivier, Fabrice ULg et al

in Veterinary Research (2007), 38(6, NOV-DEC), 819-834

We report DNA immunisation experiments in cattle using plasmid constructs that encoded glycoprotein E2 from bovine viral diarrhoea virus (BVDV)-1 (E2.1) and BVDV-2 (E2.2). The coding sequences were ... [more ▼]

We report DNA immunisation experiments in cattle using plasmid constructs that encoded glycoprotein E2 from bovine viral diarrhoea virus (BVDV)-1 (E2.1) and BVDV-2 (E2.2). The coding sequences were optimised for efficient expression in mammalian cells. A modified leader peptide sequence from protein gD of BoHV1 was inserted upstream of the E2 coding sequences for efficient membrane export of the proteins. Recombinant E2 were efficiently expressed in COS7 cells and they presented the native viral epitopes as judged by differential recognition by antisera from cattle infected with BVDV-1 or BVDV-2. Inoculation of pooled plasmid DNA in young cattle elicited antibodies capable of neutralising viral strains representing the major circulating BVDV genotypes. [less ▲]

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