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See detailA 3-year long study of Staphylococcus aureus isolates from subclinical mastitis in three Azawak zebu herds at the Sahelian experimental farm of Toukounous, Niger
Issa Ibrahim, Abdoulkarim; Duprez, Jean-Noël ULg; Bada-alambdeji, Rianatou et al

in Tropical Animal Health and Production (2016), 48(2), 321-329

bovine mastitis. The aim of the present work was to follow in three herds and during the 3 years the clonality of S. aureus isolated from California Mastitis Test (CMT)-positive cows at the experimental ... [more ▼]

bovine mastitis. The aim of the present work was to follow in three herds and during the 3 years the clonality of S. aureus isolated from California Mastitis Test (CMT)-positive cows at the experimental station of Toukounous (Niger) by (i) comparing their pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) fingerprints, (ii) identifying their virulotypes by PCR amplification and (iii) assessing the production of capsule and the formation of biofilm. The 88 S. aureus isolates belonged to 14 different pulsotypes, 3 of them being predominant: A (30 %), D (27 %), B (15 %). A and B pulsotypes had the highest profile similarity coefficient (94 %), while others had similarity coefficients under 60 %. Seventy-five S. aureus isolates were further studied for their virulotypes, capsular antigens and biofilm production. Most surface factor-, leukocidin- and haemolysin-, but not the enterotoxin-encoding genes were detected in the majority (>75 %) of the isolates and were evenly distributed between the A, B and D pulsotype isolates. The majority of the 72 S. aureus positive with the cap5H or cap8H PCR produced the CP5 (82 %) or the CP8 (88 %) capsular antigen, respectively. Biofilm production by the 57 icaA-positive isolates was strong for 8 isolates, moderate for 31 isolates but weak for 18 isolates, implying that the icaA gene may not be expressed in vitro by one third of the positive isolates. Similar to other studies, those results confirm that a restricted number of S. aureus clones circulate within the three herds at Toukounous and that their specific virulence-associated properties must still be further studied [less ▲]

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See detailNutritive value of three tropical forgae legumes and their influence on growth performance, carcass traits and organ weights of pigs
Kambashi Mutiaka, Bienvenu ULg; Kalala Bolokango, Gaetan ULg; Dochain, Denis et al

in Tropical Animal Health and Production (2016), 48(6), 1165-1173

The effects of tropical forage legumes on feed intake, growth performance and carcass traits were investigated in 16 groups of two Large White × Duroc pigs. The diets consisted of a commercial ... [more ▼]

The effects of tropical forage legumes on feed intake, growth performance and carcass traits were investigated in 16 groups of two Large White × Duroc pigs. The diets consisted of a commercial corn–soybean meal diet as the basal diet and three forage-supplemented diets. Four groups of control pigs received daily 4 % of body weight of the basal diet, and 12 groups of experimental pigs were fed the basal diet at 3.2 % of body weight completed with fresh leaves of one of the three forage legumes (Psophocarpus scandens, Stylosanthes guianensis and Vigna unguiculata) ad libitum. The study lasted 90 days. The in vitro digestion and fermentation of the forage legumes were also determined. The in vitro digestible energy content of the legumes was between 0.72 and 0.77 that of the basal diet (14.4 MJ/kg dry matter (DM)). V. unguiculata was the most digestible forage legume expected for crude protein digestibility. Feeding forage legumes lowered the dry matter intake by 4.5 to 9.6 % (P< 0.05), final body weight (P= 0.013), slaughter weight, average daily gain and hot carcass weight (P< 0.05) without affecting the feed conversion ratio (FCR), dressing percentage and back fat thickness. In conclusion, using forage to feed pig could be interesting in pig smallholder productionwith limited access to concentrate, as FCR was not significantly affected. [less ▲]

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See detailEffect of cow colostrum on the performance and survival rate of local newborn piglets in Benin Republic
Agbokounou, Mahoutin Aristide; Ahounou, Serge Gbenangnon; Youssao, Issaka Abdou Karim et al

in Tropical Animal Health and Production (2016)

The effect of bovine colostrum, including its thermally labile compounds, on the survival and growth performance of local breed piglets reared by their mother, in Benin, was evaluated over a 49-day trial ... [more ▼]

The effect of bovine colostrum, including its thermally labile compounds, on the survival and growth performance of local breed piglets reared by their mother, in Benin, was evaluated over a 49-day trial. Three groups of 16 piglets, stemming from two primiparous sows belonging to a unique traditional farm, were respectively fed for the first 48 h of life with either bovine colostrum heated to 85 °C for 30 min, or thawed bovine colostrum, or colostrum from the mother. Thereafter, the animals that received bovine colostrum turned back to their mother. At day 21, almost all piglets from the group that received heated colostrum died. The highest total weight gain was obtained in the group that received thawed bovine colostrum (P ˂ 0.01), followed by the group left with the mother. Corresponding average daily gains (ADGs) were 56, 34 and 2 g/day, respectively (P ˂ 0.05). At the end of the trial, the treatment effect was highly significant on the survival of piglets (100% in the thawed colostrum group vs. 00 and 50%, respectively, in the heated colostrum group and in the group left with the mother). At day 49, numerically higher weight and ADGs were obtained in the group that received thawed cow colostrum. Thawed bovine colostrum improved the growth performance and piglet survival in the local pig breed in Benin, probably owing to thermally labile components. Bovine colostrum may be used in our farms in order to reduce pre-weaning mortality, improve the profitability of livestock farmers, and ensure survival of traditional farms. The use of bovine colostrum on farms could be facilitated by collaboration between pig farmers and bovine farmers. It could also be facilitated by the creation of a colostrum bank. [less ▲]

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See detailPreovulatory follicle diameter, growth rate and time of ovulation during induced oestrus using a CIDR® in trypanotolerant female Bos taurus N'Dama cattle.
Okouyi, M'foumou W'otari Marcel; Drion, Pierre ULg; Hanzen, Christian ULg

in Tropical Animal Health and Production (2015), 47

The aim of this study was to assess the dose (300 to 600 IU) effects of equine Chorionic Gonadotropin (eCG) on the preovulatory follicle diameter, growth rate, and time of ovulation characterized by ... [more ▼]

The aim of this study was to assess the dose (300 to 600 IU) effects of equine Chorionic Gonadotropin (eCG) on the preovulatory follicle diameter, growth rate, and time of ovulation characterized by echography. The eCG was injected at the end (D0) of the 7-day treatment with a controlled internal device release (CIDR) and a PGF2a being injected 2 days before the removal of the CIDR (D-2). The 120 female N'Dama cattle were distributed into five experimental groups. The control group (n = 26) was treated with physiological saline at the removal of the CIDR®, while the animals in the four treated groups received, respectively, 300 IU (n = 25), 400 IU (n = 24), 500 IU (n = 22) and 600 IU (n = 23) of eCG (Folligon®). Follicle growth rate (FGR) was significantly (P < 0.05) higher in animals treated using eCG (1.0 ± 0.4mm/day) than in the control group (0.9 ± 0.4mm/day). The diameter of the preovulatory follicle was significantly higher (P < 0.05) in the animals treated with 300 IU (10.1 ± 1.4mm) than in untreated animals (9.3 ± 1.2mm). Follicle growth rate was significantly higher (P<0.05) inn the animals treated with 300 IU (10,1 ± 1,4 mm) than in the control group (0.9±0,4 mm/day). The average interval between the time of eCG injection and ovulation was similar in the non-treated (83.7 ± 14.4 h) and treated animals (79.7 ± 11.9). Treated animals sowed a significant increase in the percentga of ovulation (94,7 %) compared to 73,1 %) (P<0.01). Use of eCG combined contributed towards synchronising the time of ovulation between 72 to 96 hours, which would facilitate the use of systematic insemination. [less ▲]

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See detailDigestibility of solvent-treated Jatropha curcas kernel by broiler chickens in Senegal
Nesseim, Thierry Daniel Tamsir; Dieng, Abdoulaye; Mergeai, Guy ULg et al

in Tropical Animal Health and Production (2015)

Jatropha curcas is a drought-resistant shrub belonging to the Euphorbiaceae family. The kernel contains approximately 60 % lipid in dry matter, and the meal obtained after oil extraction could be an ... [more ▼]

Jatropha curcas is a drought-resistant shrub belonging to the Euphorbiaceae family. The kernel contains approximately 60 % lipid in dry matter, and the meal obtained after oil extraction could be an exceptional source of protein for family poultry farming, in the absence of curcin and, especially, some diterpene derivatives phorbol esters that are partially lipophilic. The nutrient digestibility of J. curcas kernel meal (JKM), obtained after partial physicochemical deoiling was thus evaluated in broiler chickens. Twenty broiler chickens, 6 weeks old, were maintained in individual metabolic cages and divided into four groups of five animals, according to a 4 × 4 Latin square design where deoiled JKM was incorporated into grinded corn at 0, 4, 8, and 12 % levels (diets 0, 4, 8, and 12 J), allowing measurement of nutrient digestibility by the differential method. The dry matter (DM) and organic matter (OM) digestibility of diets was affected to a low extent by JKM (85 and 86 % in 0 J and 81 % in 12 J, respectively) in such a way that DM and OM digestibility of JKM was estimated to be close to 50 %. The ether extract (EE) digestibility of JKM remained high, at about 90 %, while crude protein (CP) and crude fiber (CF) digestibility were largely impacted by JKM, with values closed to 40 % at the highest levels of incorporation. J. curcas kernel presents various nutrient digestibilities but has adverse effects on CP and CF digestibility of the diet. The effects of an additional heat or biological treatment on JKM remain to be assessed. [less ▲]

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See detailAn echographic study of follicular growth during induced estrus in female Azawak zebu in Niger
Moussa Garba, Mahamadou; Moumouni, Issa; Hamani, Marichatou et al

in Tropical Animal Health and Production (2015), 47

An echographic study of follicular growth up to ovulation was carried out on 42 lactating Azawakh cows (Bos indicus) after estrus induction by means of a PGF2α or a procedure involving the administration ... [more ▼]

An echographic study of follicular growth up to ovulation was carried out on 42 lactating Azawakh cows (Bos indicus) after estrus induction by means of a PGF2α or a procedure involving the administration of progesterone vaginally (PRID® DELTA: Progesterone-releasing intravaginal device) for a ten-day period and the injection of a PGF2α and an eCG (400 and 800 IU) on withdrawal. All the animals treated in this way were inseminated 12 and 24 hrs after the onset of estrus. The percentage of estrus induced was not significantly different between the two groups of animals (81%). The average time delay before the onset of estrus was significantly longer after injection of a PGF2α (84.8 ± 26.0 hrs) than after withdrawal of the PRID® (59.2 ± 5.8 hrs). The average duration of the estrus was significantly shorter after its induction by PGF2α (12.6 ± 2.6 hrs) than after induction by progesterone (22.9 ± 2.7 hrs). There was not a significant difference in the interval between the beginning of estrus and ovulation in animals treated by PGF2α (30.3 hrs) and progesterone (28.4 hrs). Injection of a PGF2α was accompanied by a significantly lower rate of gestation than that obtained after treatment of animals by progesterone (31.2% vs 54.5 %). These results confirm the necessity to adapt an insemination policy to hormonal treatment for estrus induction in Bos indicus. [less ▲]

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See detailFeeding value of hays of tropical forage legumes in pigs: Vigna unguiculata, Psophocarpus scandens, Pueraria phaseoloides and Stylosanthes guianensis
Kambashi Mutiaka, Bienvenu ULg; Boudry, Christelle ULg; Picron, Pascale ULg et al

in Tropical Animal Health and Production (2014), 46(8),

he effects of four tropical forage legume hays (Vigna unguiculata, Psophocarpus scandens, Pueraria phaseoloides and Stylosanthes guianensis) on voluntary feed intake (VFI) and their nutritive value were ... [more ▼]

he effects of four tropical forage legume hays (Vigna unguiculata, Psophocarpus scandens, Pueraria phaseoloides and Stylosanthes guianensis) on voluntary feed intake (VFI) and their nutritive value were studied in growing pigs using a corn-soybean meal-based diet containing varying proportions of forage legume hays (0, 10, 20 and 40 % or 0, 12.5 and 25 % for VFI and nutritive value determination, respectively). There was no difference in VFI between species (P > 0.20), but a linear response to forage inclusion level (P < 0.05) was observed decreasing from 126 for 0 % to approximately 84 g/kg of body weight for the 40 % forage diets, except for V. unguiculata, where the response was quadratic (P = 0.01). All four forage species linearly decreased the total tract apparent digestibility (TTAD) from 0.76 to 0.61, 0.80 to 0.68, 0.54 to 0.40 and 0.58 to 0.31 except for S. guianensis (0.44) for DM, N, NDF and N retention, respectively. Differences in digestibility (P < 0.05) between species were also observed. Due to their negative influence on the overall digestibility, the contribution of hays should not exceed 12.5 %, except for S. guianensis, in which N retention remained quite high (0.44) at the highest inclusion level (25 %). P. phaseoloides hay should be avoided in pigs as it combines the lowest VFI with the lowest nutrient digestibility [less ▲]

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See detailCharacterisation of camel breeding practices in the Ansongo Region, Mali
Traoré, Bakary ULg; Moula, Nassim ULg; Touré, Abdoulaye ULg et al

in Tropical Animal Health and Production (2014), 46

Despite its importance in Mali’s economy, camel breeding in the country remains poorly documented, impeding effective policy-making in this regard. This study consisted in a 3-month survey and aimed at ... [more ▼]

Despite its importance in Mali’s economy, camel breeding in the country remains poorly documented, impeding effective policy-making in this regard. This study consisted in a 3-month survey and aimed at characterising camel breeding systems in Ansongo, in the region of Gao, Mali. It highlights the diversity of strategies adopted by breeders and their evolutions. Supplementary feeding and veterinary care were seldom practised. In zones close to the Niger River, cattle were substituted to camels. Transhumance routes also are modified but mobility keeps its vital role in the breeding system. Important differences within the study region in the classification of camel breeds have been reported that will influence the implementation of a collective action for animal genetic improvement. The improvement goals should take the actual management, including mobility and the mixed nature of the herds into account. [less ▲]

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See detailAccuracy of transrectal palpation for early pregnancy diagnosis in Egyptian buffaloes.
Karen, A. M.; Darwish, S.; Ramoun, A. et al

in Tropical Animal Health and Production (2011), 43(1), 5-7

The present study was undertaken to evaluate the accuracy of transrectal palpation (TRP) for diagnosing early pregnancy in buffaloes and the false diagnoses of the TRP test by using the pregnancy ... [more ▼]

The present study was undertaken to evaluate the accuracy of transrectal palpation (TRP) for diagnosing early pregnancy in buffaloes and the false diagnoses of the TRP test by using the pregnancy-associated glycoprotein radioimmunoassay (PAG-RIA) test. Pregnancy was diagnosed in 168 buffalo-cows once by TRP and PAG-RIA test between days 31 and 55 after breeding. The sensitivity of TRP for detecting pregnant buffalo-cows was 37.5% at days 31-35, increased to 93.8% at days 46-50 and reached 100% at days 51-55 (P < 0.01). All cases of false negative diagnoses (n = 10) had PAG concentration higher than the threshold (>/=1.8 ng/mL) for diagnosing pregnancy. The specificity of TRP for detecting non-pregnant buffalo cows ranged between 90.9%, and 100% between days 31 and 55. All cases of false positive diagnoses (n = 5) made by TRP had PAG concentrations lower than the threshold for diagnosing pregnancy. It could be concluded that TRP is an accurate method for diagnosing pregnant and non-pregnant buffalo cows from day 46 after breeding. [less ▲]

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See detailRipening influences banana and plantain peels composition and energy content
Happi Emaga, Thomas ULg; Bindelle, Jérôme ULg; Angeesens, Richard et al

in Tropical Animal Health and Production (2011), 43

Musa sp. peels are widely used by smallholders as complementary feeds for cattle in the tropics. A study of the influence of the variety and the maturation stage of the fruit on fermentability and ... [more ▼]

Musa sp. peels are widely used by smallholders as complementary feeds for cattle in the tropics. A study of the influence of the variety and the maturation stage of the fruit on fermentability and metabolisable energy (ME) content of the peels was performed using banana (Yangambi Km5) and plantain (Big Ebanga) peels at three stages of maturation in an in vitro model of the rumen. Peel samples were analysed for starch, free sugars and fibre composition. Samples were incubated in the presence of rumen fluid. Kinetics of gas production were modelled, ME content was calculated using prediction equation and short-chain fatty acids production and molar ratio were measured after 72 h of fermentation. Final gas production was higher in plantain (269–339 ml g−1) compared to banana (237–328 ml g−1) and plantain exhibited higher ME contents (8.9–9.7 MJ/kg of dry matter, DM) compared to banana (7.7–8.8 MJ/kg of DM). Butyrate molar ratio decreased with maturity of the peels. The main influence of the variety and the stage of maturation on all fermentation parameters as well as ME contents of the peels was correlated to changes in the carbohydrate fraction of the peels, including starch and fibre. [less ▲]

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See detailNutritive value of unconventional fibrous ingredients fed to Guinea pigs in the Democratic Republic of Congo
Bindelle, Jérôme ULg; Kinsama, Armen; Picron, Pascale ULg et al

in Tropical Animal Health and Production (2009), 41

The energy and protein value for Guinea pigs (GP) of 9 forages (7 dicots and 2 grasses) and 5 hay-based diets was determined. The apparent faecal digestibility of dry matter, organic matter, crude protein ... [more ▼]

The energy and protein value for Guinea pigs (GP) of 9 forages (7 dicots and 2 grasses) and 5 hay-based diets was determined. The apparent faecal digestibility of dry matter, organic matter, crude protein and energy was measured on GP housed in metabolic cages. The forages and the diets were digested in vitro using pepsin and pancreatin hydrolysis and gas fermentation test to simulate stomach, small intestine and large intestine, respectively. Most of the dicots had high digestible crude protein content (152–201 g/kg DM) and the 2 grasses showed lower values (80–85 g/kg DM). Digestible energy content of the forages ranged between 5.79 to 13.08 MJ/kg DM. None of the forage species or hay-based diets provided sufficient energy to supply the 11.7 MJ/kg metabolic energy requirements. The influence of intestinal fermentation on energy and protein values was highlighted by correlations (P<0.05) between in vivo and in vitro data, including gas fermentation. It is the first time that such relationships are reported in single-stomach animals. [less ▲]

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See detailTuareg ethnoveterinary treatments of camel diseases in Agadez area (Niger)
Antoine-Moussiaux, Nicolas ULg; Faye, Bernard; Vias, Gilles Franck

in Tropical Animal Health and Production (2007), 39(2), 83-89

For generations, nomadic herders have been learning to manage herd health, particularly in dromedaries because of their great value. Owing to the unavailability of veterinary services, camel herders in ... [more ▼]

For generations, nomadic herders have been learning to manage herd health, particularly in dromedaries because of their great value. Owing to the unavailability of veterinary services, camel herders in remote areas have been developing their own pharmacopoeia and veterinary techniques. The bleeding of sick animals is a common treatment, as Tuareg herders believe that 'tainted blood' (izni) is the cause of many conditions. Several surgical techniques are also used, such as excision of calcified sublingual cord. The remedies mentioned in this survey are derived from Maerua crassifolia, Boscia senegalensis, Acacia raddiana, Cucumis prophetarum, Calotropis procera, Ricinus communis, Citrullus colocynthis, green tea, millet, tobacco and onions. Artificial elements are also used for treatment of animals: Powders collected from batteries, various haircare or skincare creams, crushed glass, insecticides or motor oil belong to their pharmacopoeia. This broadmindedness allows the introduction of modern veterinary medicine. Factors such as the lack of real production objectives constitute limits to this progress, however. [less ▲]

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See detailIndigenous Muscovy ducks in Congo-Brazzaville. 1. A survey of indigenous Muscovy duck management in households in Dolisie City
Banga-Mboko, H.; Maes, D.; Leroy, Pascal ULg

in Tropical Animal Health and Production (2007), 39(2), 115-122

A cross-sectional study by means of a questionnaire with open-ended questions and multiple-choice questions was used to collect data on the profile of duck keepers, husbandry practices, and performances ... [more ▼]

A cross-sectional study by means of a questionnaire with open-ended questions and multiple-choice questions was used to collect data on the profile of duck keepers, husbandry practices, and performances, opportunities and constraints of Muscovy duck breeding in households (n = 88) in Dolisie city (Congo-Brazzaville). The study confirmed the common observations on traditional poultry keeping such as scavenging during the day and housing overnight. The flock size (7.7 ± 3 ducks per unit) showed no specialization of husbandry (100% of surveyed flocks were kept for simultaneous production of ducklings, meat and eggs) and a high drake-to-duck ratio (1:3). The hatchability was close to 80.5% ± 13%, whereas the average number of eggs was 13.2 ± 5 per clutch. In addition, a high mortality (80%) was observed in ducklings, which was due to poor feeding, lack of veterinary care and housing conditions. Eggs and live ducks were sold by duck farmers in response to the family needs rather than market price. The three most important findings were as follows: (1) duck keepers were mainly men (80% versus 20% of women); (2) there was no evidence of taboo; and (3) the duck as an exotic bird was not proscribed by cultural beliefs, and therefore development of the Muscovy duck in Congo Brazzaville should be unhindered. [less ▲]

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See detailVoluntary intake, chemical composition and in vitro digestibility of fresh forages fed to Guinea pigs in periurban rearing systems of Kinshasa (Democratic Republic of Congo)
Bindelle, Jérôme ULg; Ilunga, Yves; Delacollette, Maud et al

in Tropical Animal Health and Production (2007), 39

The daily voluntary intake (DVI) of Guinea pigs (GP) fed 15 fresh forages used in periurban rearing systems of Kinshasa (Democratic Republic of Congo) was investigated. In order to determine the best ... [more ▼]

The daily voluntary intake (DVI) of Guinea pigs (GP) fed 15 fresh forages used in periurban rearing systems of Kinshasa (Democratic Republic of Congo) was investigated. In order to determine the best forages combination for GP diet, DVI was compared to their nutritional value measured in vitro using 1) a pepsinpancreatin hydrolysis, 2) an gas fermentation test on the hydrolysed residues with an inoculum prepared from GP faeces, and 3) the chemical composition of the offered feeds and the hydrolysis residues. The forages ranking based on the DVI was correlated to the NDF content, but not to their nutritional values determined in vitro. According to their high DVI (from 4.23 to 7.75 g/kg liveweigth), and their valuable in vitro nutritional values (crude protein ranging from 261 to 279 g crude protein kg−1DM, pepsin-pancreatin digestibilities of the dry matter from 0.55 to 0.59 and final gas production from 170 to 196 l kg−1DM), Desmodium intortum, Euphorbia heterophylla or Amaranthus hybridus, can be suggested to the farmers to complement the usual diet distributed to the GP based on Panicum maximum. [less ▲]

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See detailIndigenous Muscovy ducks in Congo-Brazzaville. 2. Preliminary observations on indigenous Muscovy ducks reared under moderate inputs in Congolese conditions
Banga-Mboko, H.; Lelou, B.; Leroy, Pascal ULg et al

in Tropical Animal Health and Production (2007), 39(2), 123-129

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See detailExamination of non-genetics factors affecting the growth performance of Djallonke sheep at the Okpara breeding farm in Soudanian zone of Benin
Gbangboche, A. B.; Senou, N.; Farnir, Frédéric ULg et al

in Tropical Animal Health and Production (2006), 38(1), 55-64

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See detailExamination of non-genetic factors affecting the growth performance of Djallonke sheep in soudanian zone at the Okpara Breeding farm of Benin
Gbangboche, A. B.; Youssao, A. K. I.; Adamou-Ndiaye, M. et al

in Tropical Animal Health and Production (2006), 38

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See detailCharacteristics of peri-urban dairy herds of Bobo-Dioulasso (Burkina Faso)
Sidibe, M.; Boly, Hamidou ULg; Lakouetene, T. et al

in Tropical Animal Health and Production (2004), 36(1), 95-100

Peri-urban dairy cattle farms within 50 km of Bobo-Dioulasso were studied to assess herd type, disease incidence, management, feeding and breeding strategy. Out of 417 cattle farmers, 42% had dairy ... [more ▼]

Peri-urban dairy cattle farms within 50 km of Bobo-Dioulasso were studied to assess herd type, disease incidence, management, feeding and breeding strategy. Out of 417 cattle farmers, 42% had dairy objectives and were studied. Among these peri-urban dairy farmers, 60% were settled, 36% semi-settled, and 4% transhumant. In total, they held 4558 dairy cows, of which 32% lactated during the study. The prevalence of mastitis (55%) increased (p<0.05) with herd size. Advanced strategies for supplementary feeding and breeding were most frequent in small herds (< 30 cattle). None of the large herds ( > 60 cattle) had advanced breeding strategies. Bulls and cows were culled at younger ages in herds with better breeding strategy. Overall, this resulted in higher individual milk offtake in small herds (2.46 L/day) compared with large herds (1.25 L/day). Pure breeds were rarely used, and the presence of Bos taurus baoule naturally selected for trypanotolerance was low. The prevalence of trypanosomosis (40%) in herds dominated by Bos indicus zebu and Mere (Zebu x Baoule) is an argument for maintenance of biodiversity and selection of Baoule for milk production. [less ▲]

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