References of "Tropical Animal Health and Production"
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See detailRipening influences banana and plantain peels composition and energy content
Happi Emaga, Thomas ULg; Bindelle, Jérôme ULg; Angeesens, Richard et al

in Tropical Animal Health and Production (2011), 43

Musa sp. peels are widely used by smallholders as complementary feeds for cattle in the tropics. A study of the influence of the variety and the maturation stage of the fruit on fermentability and ... [more ▼]

Musa sp. peels are widely used by smallholders as complementary feeds for cattle in the tropics. A study of the influence of the variety and the maturation stage of the fruit on fermentability and metabolisable energy (ME) content of the peels was performed using banana (Yangambi Km5) and plantain (Big Ebanga) peels at three stages of maturation in an in vitro model of the rumen. Peel samples were analysed for starch, free sugars and fibre composition. Samples were incubated in the presence of rumen fluid. Kinetics of gas production were modelled, ME content was calculated using prediction equation and short-chain fatty acids production and molar ratio were measured after 72 h of fermentation. Final gas production was higher in plantain (269–339 ml g−1) compared to banana (237–328 ml g−1) and plantain exhibited higher ME contents (8.9–9.7 MJ/kg of dry matter, DM) compared to banana (7.7–8.8 MJ/kg of DM). Butyrate molar ratio decreased with maturity of the peels. The main influence of the variety and the stage of maturation on all fermentation parameters as well as ME contents of the peels was correlated to changes in the carbohydrate fraction of the peels, including starch and fibre. [less ▲]

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See detailNutritive value of unconventional fibrous ingredients fed to Guinea pigs in the Democratic Republic of Congo
Bindelle, Jérôme ULg; Kinsama, Armen; Picron, Pascale ULg et al

in Tropical Animal Health and Production (2009), 41

The energy and protein value for Guinea pigs (GP) of 9 forages (7 dicots and 2 grasses) and 5 hay-based diets was determined. The apparent faecal digestibility of dry matter, organic matter, crude protein ... [more ▼]

The energy and protein value for Guinea pigs (GP) of 9 forages (7 dicots and 2 grasses) and 5 hay-based diets was determined. The apparent faecal digestibility of dry matter, organic matter, crude protein and energy was measured on GP housed in metabolic cages. The forages and the diets were digested in vitro using pepsin and pancreatin hydrolysis and gas fermentation test to simulate stomach, small intestine and large intestine, respectively. Most of the dicots had high digestible crude protein content (152–201 g/kg DM) and the 2 grasses showed lower values (80–85 g/kg DM). Digestible energy content of the forages ranged between 5.79 to 13.08 MJ/kg DM. None of the forage species or hay-based diets provided sufficient energy to supply the 11.7 MJ/kg metabolic energy requirements. The influence of intestinal fermentation on energy and protein values was highlighted by correlations (P<0.05) between in vivo and in vitro data, including gas fermentation. It is the first time that such relationships are reported in single-stomach animals. [less ▲]

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See detailTuareg ethnoveterinary treatments of camel diseases in Agadez area (Niger)
Antoine-Moussiaux, Nicolas ULg; Faye, Bernard; Vias, Gilles Franck

in Tropical Animal Health and Production (2007), 39(2), 83-89

For generations, nomadic herders have been learning to manage herd health, particularly in dromedaries because of their great value. Owing to the unavailability of veterinary services, camel herders in ... [more ▼]

For generations, nomadic herders have been learning to manage herd health, particularly in dromedaries because of their great value. Owing to the unavailability of veterinary services, camel herders in remote areas have been developing their own pharmacopoeia and veterinary techniques. The bleeding of sick animals is a common treatment, as Tuareg herders believe that 'tainted blood' (izni) is the cause of many conditions. Several surgical techniques are also used, such as excision of calcified sublingual cord. The remedies mentioned in this survey are derived from Maerua crassifolia, Boscia senegalensis, Acacia raddiana, Cucumis prophetarum, Calotropis procera, Ricinus communis, Citrullus colocynthis, green tea, millet, tobacco and onions. Artificial elements are also used for treatment of animals: Powders collected from batteries, various haircare or skincare creams, crushed glass, insecticides or motor oil belong to their pharmacopoeia. This broadmindedness allows the introduction of modern veterinary medicine. Factors such as the lack of real production objectives constitute limits to this progress, however. [less ▲]

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See detailIndigenous Muscovy ducks in Congo-Brazzaville. 1. A survey of indigenous Muscovy duck management in households in Dolisie City
Banga-Mboko, H.; Maes, D.; Leroy, Pascal ULg

in Tropical Animal Health and Production (2007), 39(2), 115-122

A cross-sectional study by means of a questionnaire with open-ended questions and multiple-choice questions was used to collect data on the profile of duck keepers, husbandry practices, and performances ... [more ▼]

A cross-sectional study by means of a questionnaire with open-ended questions and multiple-choice questions was used to collect data on the profile of duck keepers, husbandry practices, and performances, opportunities and constraints of Muscovy duck breeding in households (n = 88) in Dolisie city (Congo-Brazzaville). The study confirmed the common observations on traditional poultry keeping such as scavenging during the day and housing overnight. The flock size (7.7 ± 3 ducks per unit) showed no specialization of husbandry (100% of surveyed flocks were kept for simultaneous production of ducklings, meat and eggs) and a high drake-to-duck ratio (1:3). The hatchability was close to 80.5% ± 13%, whereas the average number of eggs was 13.2 ± 5 per clutch. In addition, a high mortality (80%) was observed in ducklings, which was due to poor feeding, lack of veterinary care and housing conditions. Eggs and live ducks were sold by duck farmers in response to the family needs rather than market price. The three most important findings were as follows: (1) duck keepers were mainly men (80% versus 20% of women); (2) there was no evidence of taboo; and (3) the duck as an exotic bird was not proscribed by cultural beliefs, and therefore development of the Muscovy duck in Congo Brazzaville should be unhindered. [less ▲]

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See detailVoluntary intake, chemical composition and in vitro digestibility of fresh forages fed to Guinea pigs in periurban rearing systems of Kinshasa (Democratic Republic of Congo)
Bindelle, Jérôme ULg; Ilunga, Yves; Delacollette, Maud et al

in Tropical Animal Health and Production (2007), 39

The daily voluntary intake (DVI) of Guinea pigs (GP) fed 15 fresh forages used in periurban rearing systems of Kinshasa (Democratic Republic of Congo) was investigated. In order to determine the best ... [more ▼]

The daily voluntary intake (DVI) of Guinea pigs (GP) fed 15 fresh forages used in periurban rearing systems of Kinshasa (Democratic Republic of Congo) was investigated. In order to determine the best forages combination for GP diet, DVI was compared to their nutritional value measured in vitro using 1) a pepsinpancreatin hydrolysis, 2) an gas fermentation test on the hydrolysed residues with an inoculum prepared from GP faeces, and 3) the chemical composition of the offered feeds and the hydrolysis residues. The forages ranking based on the DVI was correlated to the NDF content, but not to their nutritional values determined in vitro. According to their high DVI (from 4.23 to 7.75 g/kg liveweigth), and their valuable in vitro nutritional values (crude protein ranging from 261 to 279 g crude protein kg−1DM, pepsin-pancreatin digestibilities of the dry matter from 0.55 to 0.59 and final gas production from 170 to 196 l kg−1DM), Desmodium intortum, Euphorbia heterophylla or Amaranthus hybridus, can be suggested to the farmers to complement the usual diet distributed to the GP based on Panicum maximum. [less ▲]

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See detailIndigenous Muscovy ducks in Congo-Brazzaville. 2. Preliminary observations on indigenous Muscovy ducks reared under moderate inputs in Congolese conditions
Banga-Mboko, H.; Lelou, B.; Leroy, Pascal ULg et al

in Tropical Animal Health and Production (2007), 39(2), 123-129

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See detailExamination of non-genetics factors affecting the growth performance of Djallonke sheep at the Okpara breeding farm in Soudanian zone of Benin
Gbangboche, A. B.; Senou, N.; Farnir, Frédéric ULg et al

in Tropical Animal Health and Production (2006), 38(1), 55-64

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See detailExamination of non-genetic factors affecting the growth performance of Djallonke sheep in soudanian zone at the Okpara Breeding farm of Benin
Gbangboche, A. B.; Youssao, A. K. I.; Adamou-Ndiaye, M. et al

in Tropical Animal Health and Production (2006), 38

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See detailCharacteristics of peri-urban dairy herds of Bobo-Dioulasso (Burkina Faso)
Sidibe, M.; Boly, Hamidou ULg; Lakouetene, T. et al

in Tropical Animal Health and Production (2004), 36(1), 95-100

Peri-urban dairy cattle farms within 50 km of Bobo-Dioulasso were studied to assess herd type, disease incidence, management, feeding and breeding strategy. Out of 417 cattle farmers, 42% had dairy ... [more ▼]

Peri-urban dairy cattle farms within 50 km of Bobo-Dioulasso were studied to assess herd type, disease incidence, management, feeding and breeding strategy. Out of 417 cattle farmers, 42% had dairy objectives and were studied. Among these peri-urban dairy farmers, 60% were settled, 36% semi-settled, and 4% transhumant. In total, they held 4558 dairy cows, of which 32% lactated during the study. The prevalence of mastitis (55%) increased (p<0.05) with herd size. Advanced strategies for supplementary feeding and breeding were most frequent in small herds (< 30 cattle). None of the large herds ( > 60 cattle) had advanced breeding strategies. Bulls and cows were culled at younger ages in herds with better breeding strategy. Overall, this resulted in higher individual milk offtake in small herds (2.46 L/day) compared with large herds (1.25 L/day). Pure breeds were rarely used, and the presence of Bos taurus baoule naturally selected for trypanotolerance was low. The prevalence of trypanosomosis (40%) in herds dominated by Bos indicus zebu and Mere (Zebu x Baoule) is an argument for maintenance of biodiversity and selection of Baoule for milk production. [less ▲]

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