References of "Recueil des Travaux Chimiques des Pays-Bas et de la Belgique. 2e série"
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See detailSur la densité et l'état allotropique de certaines variétés de soufre : Remarque sur la détermination de la densité des corps en poudre fine
Spring, Walthère ULg

in Recueil des Travaux Chimiques des Pays-Bas et de la Belgique. 2e série (1907), XXVI

Spring, W. Recueil des Travaux chimiques des Pays-Bas et de la Belgique (1908), 26, 357-72;SciFinder (Chemical Abstracts Service: Columbus, OH); https://scifinder.cas.org (accessed July 8, 2010). The ... [more ▼]

Spring, W. Recueil des Travaux chimiques des Pays-Bas et de la Belgique (1908), 26, 357-72;SciFinder (Chemical Abstracts Service: Columbus, OH); https://scifinder.cas.org (accessed July 8, 2010). The author prepared "milk of sulphur" by treating KnS with dil. HCl, and also by passing H2S into FeCl3 solution. The S from the K2Sn was completely sol. in CS2 and had a density of 2.0555, which is approximately the same as that of rhombic S. That from H2S was soluble CS2 to the extent of 96.8% only, and the density of the soluble portion was 2.0658, while that of the insoluble was 1.8686. The greater part of the sulphur from the K2Sn was therefore identical with that from H2S. This conclusion was confirmed by measuring their specific heats Reprinted with the permission of the American Chemical Society. Copyright © 2010. American Chemical Society (ACS). All Rights Reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailSur la densité de l'iodure cuivreux
Spring, Walthère ULg

in Recueil des Travaux Chimiques des Pays-Bas et de la Belgique. 2e série (1901), XX

Spring, W. Recueil des Travaux Chimiques des Pays-Bas (1901), 20, 79-80 ; SciFinder (Chemical Abstracts Service: Columbus, OH); https://scifinder.cas.org (accessed July 8, 2010). The sp.gr. of dry ... [more ▼]

Spring, W. Recueil des Travaux Chimiques des Pays-Bas (1901), 20, 79-80 ; SciFinder (Chemical Abstracts Service: Columbus, OH); https://scifinder.cas.org (accessed July 8, 2010). The sp.gr. of dry cuprousiodide is 5.653° at 15°, not 4.41° as stated by Schiff (Annalen, 1858, 108, 24); the molecular volume is thus 33.61, and is less than the sum of the atomic volumes of the elements (34.73), showing that, as usual, a contraction has occured in combination. Reprinted with the permission of the American Chemical Society. Copyright © 2010. American Chemical Society (ACS). All Rights Reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailSur la floculation des milieux troubles
Spring, Walthère ULg

in Recueil des Travaux Chimiques des Pays-Bas et de la Belgique. 2e série (1900), XIX

Spring, W. Recueil des Travaux Chimiques des Pays-Bas (1900), 19, 204-35 ; SciFinder (Chemical Abstracts Service: Columbus, OH); https://scifinder.cas.org (accessed July 8, 2010). This paper commences ... [more ▼]

Spring, W. Recueil des Travaux Chimiques des Pays-Bas (1900), 19, 204-35 ; SciFinder (Chemical Abstracts Service: Columbus, OH); https://scifinder.cas.org (accessed July 8, 2010). This paper commences with an historical summary of the researches of previous observers on liquids rendered turbid by the presence of solid substances in a minute state of division (pseudo-solutions), and a bibliography of the subject is given in an appendix. Details are then given of the author's own experiments, the results of which are summarised as follows. Solutions of salts which, which like those of polyvalent metals, cannot be obtained in an optically transparent condition (Abstr., 1899, ii, 537) bring about the flocculation of turbid liquids much more readily than solutions of any other salts. This result is due partly to the agglutinative power of the metallic hydroxides formed by the hydrolysing action of the water, and partly to the flocculating action of the acids simultaneously produced. The extent of the flocculation caused by hydroxides is closely connected with their chemical and physical character as well as with the nature of the turbidity. The behaviour of the turbidity towards salt solutions somewhat resembles that of a membrane, the acid formed by the hydrolysis of the salt traversing the liquid by diffusion whilst the metallic hydroxide is precipitated with the substance causing the turbidity. The persistence of very fine turbidities bears a relation to the Brownian motion. In consequence of this motion, particles suspended in pure water frequently collide with one another without coming into actual contact, but if an electrolyte is present the particles agglutinate, the Brownian motion ceases, and the flocks formed are deposited. The flocculation of liquids is not brought about by electrical action at a distance, as by Rontgen rays or the electricity developed by a statical machine or an induction coil, and cannot therefore be compared with the precipitation of dust particles in air. The feeblest electric current is, however, sufficient to induce clarification, which in the majority of cases commences at the cathode. Electrolytes of the same conductivity but having different anions and cations influence the flocculation very unequally. Electrolytes having the same cation induce flocculation in equal times, whilst the nature of the anion plays only a secondary part. The rate of flocculation in different electrolytes having the same anion is exactly in the order of the velocities of the cations in electrolysis. It therefore appears that the primary cause of the flocculation brought about by electrolytes is to be sought in the velocities of the ions. Reprinted with the permission of the American Chemical Society. Copyright © 2010. American Chemical Society (ACS). All Rights Reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailSur la réalisation d'un liquide optiquement vide
Spring, Walthère ULg

in Recueil des Travaux Chimiques des Pays-Bas et de la Belgique. 2e série (1899), XVIII

Spring, W. Recueil des Travaux Chimiques des Pays-Bas (1899), 18, 153-68; SciFinder (Chemical Abstracts Service: Columbus, OH); https://scifinder.cas.org (accessed July 8, 2010). Tyndall has assumed that ... [more ▼]

Spring, W. Recueil des Travaux Chimiques des Pays-Bas (1899), 18, 153-68; SciFinder (Chemical Abstracts Service: Columbus, OH); https://scifinder.cas.org (accessed July 8, 2010). Tyndall has assumed that when a beam of light passes through a gas its path is made evident by the illumination of minute solid or liquid particles present as impurities. Lallemand, however, from experiments with carefully distilled liquids, concluded that the illumination of a fluid medium by light is a specific property of the medium, and that each medium has a certain "coefficient of illumination", dependent on its nature. The author now shows that, although it is impossible to obtain a truly transparent liquid (that is, one which is not rendered luminous by the passage of a beam of light) by distillation or filtration, liquids can be rendered optically pure by means of a current of electricity; on passing, for example, a current through water containing a small quantity of silica or ferric hydroxide in suspension, the suspended matter is deposited at the cathode, and carries with it the minute particles which render the water capable of being illuminated. The same result is also obtained by adding clear lime water to a solution of silicic acid, and leaving the precipitate to subside in a stoppered vessel; on examining the liquid in a beam of light, care being taken that the vessel is not opened, it is found to be perfectly transparent. The subsidence of other gelatinous precipitates, such as the hydroxides of iron, aluminium, and zinc, from water renders the latter non-illuminable; the subsidence of crystalline precipitates, however, such as barium sulphate or calcium oxalate, gives no such result. It thus appears probable that the minute suspended particles can only be removed by being surrounded, during the precipitation, with a heavy, gelatinous envelope. The filtration of water through a layer of a gelatinous precipitate, out of contact with the air, renders it transparent; but if filtered in contact with air, this result is not obtained. The reason why distillation fails to yield transparent liquids is thus made evident. In the case of organic liquids, the author has not obtained such definite results; the subsidence of gelatinous precipitates from organic liquids is, as a rule, very incomplete, so that optical transparency cannot generally be obtained. It appears probable also, that many organic liquids become luminous on the passage of a beam of light, owing to fluorescence. The particles which are rendered luminous in water by a beam of light appear to consist largely of organic matter, but luminescence is also due to minute bubbles of gas; this is made clear by the increased illumination which occurs when the pressure in the space above the water is diminished, and by the fact that optically transparent water is rendered luminescent by passing air through it. Reprinted with the permission of the American Chemical Society. Copyright © 2010. American Chemical Society (ACS). All Rights Reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailSur les matières colorantes à base de fer des terrains de sédiment et sur l'origine probable des roches rouges
Spring, Walthère ULg

in Recueil des Travaux Chimiques des Pays-Bas et de la Belgique. 2e série (1898), XVII

Spring, W. Recueil des Travaux Chimiques des Pays-Bas (1898), 17, 202-21; SciFinder (Chemical Abstracts Service: Columbus, OH); https://scifinder.cas.org (accessed July 8, 2010). Ferruginous rocks can be ... [more ▼]

Spring, W. Recueil des Travaux Chimiques des Pays-Bas (1898), 17, 202-21; SciFinder (Chemical Abstracts Service: Columbus, OH); https://scifinder.cas.org (accessed July 8, 2010). Ferruginous rocks can be divided into four groups, green, ochre-yellow, wine-red, and black. The author attempts to explain the presence of two or more of these in the same strata, for example, in the Devonian series. It is shown that the yellowish-brown rocks do not owe their colour merely to ferric hydroxide as previously supposed, but to a compound of ferric hydroxide with a colourless oxide such as silica, magnesia, lime, or alumina, and as these compounds are much more stable than ferric hydroxide, they retain their colour when dehydrated, only turning brick-red on calcination, and at the same time becoming magnetic; they also resist the action of saline waters better than the simple hydroxide. The green rocks do not owe their colour to a simple ferrous silicate, but to a ferroso-ferric silicate, they are thus a special group of the black rocks coloured by magnetite. Ferric hydroxide, when in a compact form, retains its water only in an atmosphere the humidity of which is equal to its dissociation tension and at not too high a temperature; in a light form, under water, it crystallises and becomes dehydrated. Reprinted with the permission of the American Chemical Society. Copyright © 2010. American Chemical Society (ACS). All Rights Reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailNote sur un oxyde de fer tétrahydraté
Spring, Walthère ULg

in Recueil des Travaux Chimiques des Pays-Bas et de la Belgique. 2e série (1898), XVII

Spring, W. Recueil des Travaux Chimiques des Pays-Bas (1898), 17, 222-3; SciFinder (Chemical Abstracts Service: Columbus, OH); https://scifinder.cas.org (accessed July 8, 2010). If the voluminous ... [more ▼]

Spring, W. Recueil des Travaux Chimiques des Pays-Bas (1898), 17, 222-3; SciFinder (Chemical Abstracts Service: Columbus, OH); https://scifinder.cas.org (accessed July 8, 2010). If the voluminous precipitate obtained by the addition of ammonia to a dilute solution of ferric chloride or sulphate is dried spontaneously at the ordinary temperature, a vitreous substance is obtained, which is black in mass but red by transmitted light. It has the composition Fe2O3,4H2O. Placed in a desiccator, it loses water; its sp. gr. = 2.436 at 15°, and it is not decomposed by pressure. Reprinted with the permission of the American Chemical Society. Copyright © 2010. American Chemical Society (ACS). All Rights Reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailSur la cause de l'absence de coloration de certaines eaux limpides naturelles
Spring, Walthère ULg

in Recueil des Travaux Chimiques des Pays-Bas et de la Belgique. 2e série (1898), XVII

Spring, W. Recueil des Travaux Chimiques des Pays-Bas (1898), 17, 359-75; SciFinder (Chemical Abstracts Service: Columbus, OH); https://scifinder.cas.org (accessed July 8, 2010). Compare Abstr., 1884, 259 ... [more ▼]

Spring, W. Recueil des Travaux Chimiques des Pays-Bas (1898), 17, 359-75; SciFinder (Chemical Abstracts Service: Columbus, OH); https://scifinder.cas.org (accessed July 8, 2010). Compare Abstr., 1884, 259, and Bull. Acad. roy. Belg., 1886, [iii], 12, 814, and 1897, [iii], 34, 578. Although it is well recognised that pure water is blue when viewed through a thickness greater than 1 metre, the only natural waters which appear blue are those of mountain streams which have their origin in the ice and snow of great altitudes. Berzelius has stated (Jabresbericht, 1830, 9, 207) that the extraordinarily clear water of Lake Wettern, in Sweden, is perfectly colourless when viewed through a thickness of more than 32 feet, and has hence raised objection to the view that pure water is blue. The author has previously shown (loc. cit.) that if water contains one ten-millionth part of its weight of colloidal ferric hydroxide, it no longer appears blue, but green in colour; with quantities greater than this, the colour is yellow or brown. By macerating fragments of a red rock, such as a Devonian schist, during several weeks with frequently renewed hot caustic potash, and subsequently washing with water by repeated decantation, a point is ultimately reached when the red coloring-matter ceases to subside from the washing water, even after standing several months; the particles of suspended ferric oxide (haematite) are no longer visible under a magnifying power of 150 diameters, and probably correspond with the dust of the Devonian epoch. On adding a few drops of this turbid solution to a large volume of pure water, the latter is rendered perfectly clear and colourless when viewed through a thickness of 6 metres. When the proportion of ferric oxide, however, is increased, the water quenches more and more of the transmitted light, until it finally becomes opaque, although appearing red by reflected light. These observations explain the fact that terrestrial waters rarely appear blue. That the waters of Alpine streams are generally blue is probably due to their being entirely free from suspended anhydrous ferric oxide; the cosmic dust with which they are often contaminated consists principally of meteoric iron, which possesses different optical properties from haematite, and is incapable of destroying the natural blue colour of the water. Reprinted with the permission of the American Chemical Society. Copyright © 2010. American Chemical Society (ACS). All Rights Reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailSur le spectre d'absorption de quelques corps organiques incolores et ses relations avec la structure moléculaire
Spring, Walthère ULg

in Recueil des Travaux Chimiques des Pays-Bas et de la Belgique. 2e série (1897), I

Spring, W. Rec. trav. chim. Pays-Bas (1897), 16, 1-25; SciFinder (Chemical Abstracts Service: Columbus, OH); https://scifinder.cas.org (accessed July 8, 2010). The available, very detailed work follows ... [more ▼]

Spring, W. Rec. trav. chim. Pays-Bas (1897), 16, 1-25; SciFinder (Chemical Abstracts Service: Columbus, OH); https://scifinder.cas.org (accessed July 8, 2010). The available, very detailed work follows the observations of the author's on the color water. During view of very thick layers of organic products author finds also the so-called uncolored compounds colored and observes that all compounds, which contain a hydroxyl group show a blue color, which all the more approaches the color water, when those is short the OH the following Kohlenstoffkotte. If the hydroxyl group is missing, then the products possess more or less deep-gold-yellow color. The spectral investigations more numerously, in groups of matching, organic compounds leads to the following general conclusions: The so-called uncolored organic compounds give a spectrum without absorption bands, if you consist mole of carbon chains, around those the heterologous atoms or groups in a homogeneous or symmetrical way are distributed. If these heterologous atoms or groups are however concentrated at an end of a chain or combines, then the compounds concerned give spectra with absorption bands. The number of the absorption bands seems to stand in direct relation to the number of the hydrocarbon remainders, which one can differentiate with respect to the examined compound; thus an ester two strips, their the acid radical, give whose different one corresponds to the alkyl, while the acid or the alcohol spectra with ever only one strip supplies. The position of the strips seems to be characteristic for each of the groups and remains generally the same, much with which other group the first being connected likes to apply only with more complicated compounds seems this rule not. If two groups are very closely with each other connected, then the positions of the individual absorption bands changed by the mutual influence (methyl benzene), it unite occasionally even to gang. Generally author regards his observations as a support of the ideas and the modern theory of the organic compounds, introduced of Kekuele into the science. Reprinted with the permission of the American Chemical Society. Copyright © 2010. American Chemical Society (ACS). All Rights Reserved. [less ▲]

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