References of "Radiocarbon"
     in
Bookmark and Share    
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailNew Evidence of Human Activities during the Holocene in the Lowland Forests of the Northern Congo Basin
Morin-Rivat, Julie ULg; Fayolle, Adeline ULg; Gillet, Jean-François ULg et al

in Radiocarbon (2014), 56(1), 209-220

In the last decade, the myth of the pristine tropical forest has been seriously challenged. In central Africa, there is a growing body of evidence for past human settlements along the Atlantic forests ... [more ▼]

In the last decade, the myth of the pristine tropical forest has been seriously challenged. In central Africa, there is a growing body of evidence for past human settlements along the Atlantic forests, but very little information is available about human activities further inland. In this study, we aimed at determining the temporal and spatial patterns of human activities in an archaeologically unexplored area of 110,000 km² located in the northern Congo Basin and currently covered by dense forest. Fieldwork involving archaeology as well as archaeobotany was undertaken in 36 sites located in southeastern Cameroon and in the northern Republic of Congo. Evidence of past human activities through either artifacts or charred botanical remains was observed in all excavated test pits across the study area. The set of 43 radiocarbon dates extending from 15,000 BP to the present time showed a bimodal distribution in the Late Holocene which was interpreted as two phases of human expansion with an intermediate phase of depopulation. The 2300–1300 BP phase is correlated with the migrations of supposed farming populations from northwestern Cameroon. Between 1300 and 670 BP, less material could be dated. This is in agreement with the population collapse already reported for central Africa. Following this, the 670–20 BP phase corresponds to a new period of human expansion known as the Late Iron Age. These results bring new and extensive evidence of human activities in the northern Congo Basin and support the established chronology for human history in central Africa. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 186 (57 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailThe ocean bomb radiocarbon inventory revisited
Mouchet, Anne ULg

in Radiocarbon (2013), 55(2-3), 1580-1594

Large discrepancies exist among data-based estimates and model reconstructions of the ocean bomb radiocarbon inventory. In order to resolve this gap, it has been proposed that the CO2 piston veloc- ity ... [more ▼]

Large discrepancies exist among data-based estimates and model reconstructions of the ocean bomb radiocarbon inventory. In order to resolve this gap, it has been proposed that the CO2 piston veloc- ity should be revised downward (Sweeney et al., 2007; Müller et al., 2008). Here we compare the transient 14C distributions in the ocean obtained with different formulations of the isotopic ratio commonly used in modeling studies. It is found that both the CO2 increase and the air-sea CO2 flux significantly contribute to the 1990 ocean bomb radiocarbon inventory, by around 10% each. Moreover, these two processes explain more than 25% of the inventory difference be- tween 1974 and 1990. These results imply that, as already argued by Naegler (2009), inventories based on observations which lack infor- mation about CO2 invasion are underestimated. Further, this work allows to gain insight into the reasons for discrepancies among model results. It suggests that while a comprehensive isotopic formulation is needed when addressing the global radiocarbon cycle, a simplified form is more relevant for model calibration and piston velocity assess- ment based on currently available bomb radiocarbon inventories. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 23 (5 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailWest Central African peoples: Survey of radiocarbon dates over the past 5000 years
Oslisly, Richard; Bentaleb, Ilham; Favier, Charly et al

in Radiocarbon (2013), 55(2-3), 1377-1382

Tracing human history in west central Africa suffers from a scarcity of historical data and archaeological remains. In order to provide new insight into this problem, we reviewed 733 radiocarbon dates of ... [more ▼]

Tracing human history in west central Africa suffers from a scarcity of historical data and archaeological remains. In order to provide new insight into this problem, we reviewed 733 radiocarbon dates of archaeological sites from the end of the Late Stone Age, Neolithic Stage, and Early and Late Iron Age in Cameroon, Gabon, Central African Republic, Equatorial Guinea, Republic of the Congo, and the western Democratic Republic of Congo. This review provides a spatiotemporal framework of human settlement in the forest biome. Beyond the well-known initial spread of Iron Age populations through central African forests from 2500 cal BP, it depicts the geographical patterns and links with the cultural evolution of the successive phases of human expansion from 5000 to 3000 cal BP and then from 3000 to 1600 cal BP, of the interland depopulation from 1350 to 850 cal BP, and of recolonization up to 500 cal BP. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 130 (40 ULg)