References of "Radiation Protection Dosimetry"
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See detailPathbase: A new reference resource and database for laboratory mouse pathology
Schofield, P. N.; Bard, J. B. L.; Boniver, Jacques ULg et al

in Radiation Protection Dosimetry (2004), 112(4 Sp. Iss. SI), 525-528

Pathbase (http://www.pathbase.net) is a web accessible database of histopathological images of laboratory mice, developed as a resource for the coding and archiving of data derived from the analysis of ... [more ▼]

Pathbase (http://www.pathbase.net) is a web accessible database of histopathological images of laboratory mice, developed as a resource for the coding and archiving of data derived from the analysis of mutant or genetically engineered mice and their background strains. The metadata for the images, which allows retrieval and interoperability with other databases, is derived from a series of orthogonal ontologies and controlled vocabularies. One of these controlled vocabularies, MPATH, was developed by the Pathbase Consortium as a formal description of the content of mouse histopathological images. The database currently has over 1000 images on-line with 2000 more under curation and presents a paradigm for the development of future databases dedicated to aspects of experimental biology. [less ▲]

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See detail50-60 Hz electric and magnetic field effects on cognitive function in humans: A review
Crasson, Marion ULg

in Radiation Protection Dosimetry (2003), 106(4), 333-340

This paper reviews the effect of 50-60 Hz weak electric, magnetic and combined electric and magnetic field exposure on cognitive functions such as memory, attention, information processing and time ... [more ▼]

This paper reviews the effect of 50-60 Hz weak electric, magnetic and combined electric and magnetic field exposure on cognitive functions such as memory, attention, information processing and time perception, as determined by electroencephalographic methods and performance measures. Overall, laboratory studies that have investigated the acute effects of power frequency fields on cognitive functioning in humans are heterogeneous, in terms of both electric and magnetic field (EMF) exposure and the experimental design and measures used. Results are inconsistent and difficult to interpret with regard to functional relevance for possible health risks. Statistically significant differences between field and control exposure, when they are found, are small, subtle, transitory, without any clear dose-response relationship and difficult to reproduce. The human performance or event related potentials (ERPs) measures that might specifically be affected by EMF exposure, as well as a possible cerebral structure or function that could be more sensitive to EMF, cannot be better determined. [less ▲]

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