References of "Psychoneuroendocrinology"
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See detailDynamic changes in brain aromatase activity following sexual interactions in males: Where, when and why?
de Bournonville, Catherine ULg; Dickens, Molly J.; Ball, Gregory F. et al

in Psychoneuroendocrinology (2013), 38(6), 789-99

It is increasingly recognized that estrogens produce rapid and transient effects at many neural sites ultimately impacting physiological and behavioral endpoints. The ability of estrogens to acutely ... [more ▼]

It is increasingly recognized that estrogens produce rapid and transient effects at many neural sites ultimately impacting physiological and behavioral endpoints. The ability of estrogens to acutely regulate cellular processes implies that their concentration should also be rapidly fine-tuned. Accordingly, rapid changes in the catalytic activity of aromatase, the limiting enzyme for estrogen synthesis, have been identified that could serve as a regulatory mechanism of local estrogen concentrations. However, the precise anatomical localization, time-course, triggering stimuli and functional significance of these enzymatic changes in vivo are not well understood. To address these issues as to where, when and why aromatase activity (AA) rapidly changes after sexual interactions, AA was assayed in six populations of aromatase-expressing cells microdissected from the brain of male quail that experienced varying durations of visual exposure to or copulation with a female. Sexual interactions resulted in a rapid AA inhibition. This inhibition occurred in specific brain regions (including the medial preoptic nucleus), in a context-dependent fashion and time-scale suggestive of post-translational modifications of the enzyme. Interestingly, the enzymatic fluctuations occurring in the preoptic area followed rather than preceded copulation and were tied specifically to the female's presence. This pattern of enzymatic changes suggests that rapid estrogen effects are important during the motivational phase of the behavior to trigger physiological events essential to activate mate search and copulation. [less ▲]

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See detailCortisol awakening response (CAR)’s flexibility leads to larger and more consistent associations with psychological factors than CAR magnitude
Mikolajczak, M.; Quoidbach, Jordi ULg; Vanootighem, Valentine ULg et al

in Psychoneuroendocrinology (2010)

The cortisol awakening response (CAR) is increasingly recognized as a potential biological marker of psychological and physical health status. Yet, the CAR literature is replete with contradictory results ... [more ▼]

The cortisol awakening response (CAR) is increasingly recognized as a potential biological marker of psychological and physical health status. Yet, the CAR literature is replete with contradictory results: both supposedly protective and vulnerability psychosocial factors have been associated with both increased and decreased CAR. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that the CAR flexibility would be a better indicator of psychological status than CAR magnitude. Forty-two men measures of happiness, perceived stress and neuroticism, and took saliva samples immediately on awakening, then at 15, 30, 45 and 60 min post-awakening on three study days (i.e., Sunday, Monday and Tuesday). When considering the CAR magnitude, our effects perfectly reflect the inconsistencies previously observed in the literature (i.e., the main effects of the psychological predictors are not consistent with each other, and the effect of one predictor on a given day contradicts the effect of the same predictor on another day). However, considering the CAR flexibility leads to a fully consistent pattern: protective factors (i.e., high happiness, low stress, low neurotiscim) are associated with a flexible CAR (i.e., lower CAR during weekends compared to workdays) whereas vulnerability factors (i.e., low happiness, high stress, high neurotiscim) are associated with a stiff CAR (i.e., same magnitude during weekends and workdays). We conclude that considering the CAR flexibility (e.g., between weekends and workdays) rather than the traditional CAR magnitude might be a way to understand the apparent conflicts in the CAR literature. [less ▲]

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See detailImportance of steroid receptor coactivators in the modulation of steroid action on brain and behavior
Charlier, Thierry ULg

in Psychoneuroendocrinology (2009), 34

Steroid receptors such as estrogen and androgen receptors are nuclear receptors involved in the transcriptional regulation of a large number of target genes. Steroid-dependent protein expression in the ... [more ▼]

Steroid receptors such as estrogen and androgen receptors are nuclear receptors involved in the transcriptional regulation of a large number of target genes. Steroid-dependent protein expression in the brain controls a large array of biological processes including spatial cognition, copulatory behavior and neuroprotection. The discovery of a competition, or squelch- ing, between two different nuclear receptors introduced the notion that common cofactors may be involved in the modulation of transcriptional activity of nuclear receptors. These cofactors or coregulatory proteins are functionally divided into coactivators and corepressors and are involved in chromatin remodeling and stabilization of the general transcription machinery. Although a large amount of information has been collected about the in vitro function of these coregulatory proteins, relatively little is known regarding their physiological role in vivo, particularly in the brain. Our laboratory and others have demonstrated the importance of SRC-1 in the differentia- tion and activation of steroid-dependent sexual behaviors and the related neural genes. For example, we report that the inhibition of SRC-1 expression blocks the activating effects of exogenous testosterone on male sexual behaviors and increases the volume of the median preoptic area. Other coactivators are likely to be involved in the modulation in vivo of steroid receptor activity and it seems that the presence of a precise subset of coactivators could help define the phenotype of the cell by modulating a specific downstream pathway after steroid receptor activation. The very large number of coactivators and their association into preformed complexes potentially allows the determination of hundreds of different phenotypes. The study of the expression of the coactivator and their function in vivo is required to fully understand steroid action and specificity in the brain. [less ▲]

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See detailPlasma oxytocin levels and anxiety in patients with major depression
Scantamburlo, Gabrielle ULg; Hansenne, Michel ULg; Fuchs, Sonia et al

in Psychoneuroendocrinology (2007), 32(4), 407-410

Cerebrospinal fluid and plasmatic levels of oxytocin (OT) have been found to change in mood disorders. In post-mortem studies, the numbers of OT-expressing neurons in the paraventricular nucleus have been ... [more ▼]

Cerebrospinal fluid and plasmatic levels of oxytocin (OT) have been found to change in mood disorders. In post-mortem studies, the numbers of OT-expressing neurons in the paraventricular nucleus have been reported to be increased. Moreover, OT is considered as an endogenous antistress hormone. It has also revealed antidepressive effects. OT may contribute to the dysregulation of the HPA system in major depression. The aim of the study was to assess a possible relationship between anxiety and plasma oxytocin (OT) Levels in depressive patients. Severity of depression was estimated with the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale and anxiety by using the Spielberger State-Anxiety Inventory. Results showed a significant negative correlation between oxytocin and the scored symptoms depression (r = -0.58, p = 0.003) and anxiety (r = -0.61, p = 0.005). (C) 2007 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailPlasma oxytocin levels and anxiety in patients with major depression
Scantamburlo, Gabrielle ULg; Hansenne, Michel; Fuchs, Sonia et al

in Psychoneuroendocrinology (2007)

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See detailAVP- and OT-neurophysins response to apomorphine and clonidine in major depression
Scantamburlo, Gabrielle ULg; Fuchs, Sonia; Pitchot, William ULg et al

in Psychoneuroendocrinology (2005), 30(9), 839-845

A number of studies have reported abnormalities of neurohypophyseal secretions in major depressive disorder. The purpose of the present study was to test the influence of apomorphine and clonidine ... [more ▼]

A number of studies have reported abnormalities of neurohypophyseal secretions in major depressive disorder. The purpose of the present study was to test the influence of apomorphine and clonidine injections on plasma vasopressin (AVP)-neurophysins and oxytocin(OT)-neurophysins levels, as direct index of posterior pituitary activation in major depression. Apomorphine and clonidine tests were carried out in 25 medication-free depressive patients and 25 age and gender-matched healthy controls. Blood for neurophysins analysis was drawn by venipuncture at t0, t+20, t+40, t+60 and t+120. Baseline AVP-neurophysins concentrations were significantly tower in depressives (0.12 +/- 0.14 ng/ml) than in healthy subjects (0.24 +/- 2.15 ng/ml) (p < 0.04). The response to apomorphine test revealed a significant reduced response at 20 (p=0.01), 40 (p=0.007) and 60 (p=0.02) and 120 (p=0.02) min. Following clonidine test, post hoc tests also revealed a significant decrease at 0 (p=0.04), 20 (p=0.01), 40 (p=0.007) and 60 (p=0.02) and 120 (p=0.006) min. Concerning OT-neurophysins, no significant differences were found between depressed and controls in response to clonidine or apomorphine injections. Following clonidine and apomorphine, major depressives exhibited a significantly lower peak GH response than controls. The study supports partially the hypothesis of a reduced vasopressinergic activity in depression. Moreover, we did not find any influence of acute apomorphine or clonidine injections on vasopressin-neurophysin or oxytocin-neurophysin in depressive patients. (c) 2005 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailNo major month to month variation in free testosterone levels in aging mates. Minor impact on the biological diagnosis of 'andropause'
Tancredi, Annalisa ULg; Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg; Luyckx, Françoise ULg et al

in Psychoneuroendocrinology (2005), 30(7), 638-646

BACKGROUND: The measurement of bioavailable testosterone (BT) or free testosterone (FT) levels is currently considered the gold standard for the diagnosis of androgen deficiency in elderly men. While the ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: The measurement of bioavailable testosterone (BT) or free testosterone (FT) levels is currently considered the gold standard for the diagnosis of androgen deficiency in elderly men. While the impact of age on circulating testosterone levels (total, bioavailable and free) has been strongly documented, the existence of seasonal variations in testosterone levels remains debated. OBJECTIVE: We investigated whether seasonal variations in serum calculated free testosterone (cFT) levels may translate into variations in the prevalence of low testosterone levels. Diagnosis was on the basis of biochemical determinations and was cross-checked with the prevalence of clinical signs and symptoms of 'andropause', as assessed by the Androgen Deficiency in Aging Males (ADAM) questionnaire. METHODS: The study recruited 5028 men aged 50 years and over from September 2000 to January 2003. Their serum FT levels were assessed and they completed the French ADAM test. Men were considered eugonadal when cFT was > or =70 ng/l. The ADAM test was scored as described originally. The prevalence of 'andropause', diagnosed by the two methods, was compared throughout the year, on a month by month basis. RESULTS: The percentage of subjects with cFT levels below 70 ng/l increased significantly with age (P<0.001). Serum cFT levels (mean [SD]) varied significantly with the month of sampling (P<0.0001), the highest (88.1 [30.2] ng/l) and lowest (76.9 [28.0] ng/l) mean values occurring in April and in October, respectively. Conversely, the prevalence of testosterone deficiency (cFT<70 ng/l) reached a peak in October (45.7%) and a nadir in April (29.7%). Although the prevalence of 'andropause', based on the ADAM questionnaire, increased significantly with age (P<0.0001), no influence of the month of the year was noticed. CONCLUSIONS: Our results confirm a progressive age-related decline in FT levels. The monthly variations in serum FT values, observed throughout the year, do not show a major seasonal rhythm in elderly community-dwelling males, since the magnitude of the variations (<15%) remains marginal. This slight variation may, however, have an impact on the number of elderly men diagnosed with Partial Androgen Deficiency in Aging Males (PADAM). [less ▲]

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See detailSerum melatonin and urinary 6-sulfatoxymelatonin in major depression.
Crasson, Marion ULg; Kjiri, Selwa; Colin, Anne et al

in Psychoneuroendocrinology (2004), 29

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See detailAndropause and psychopathology: minor symptoms rather than pathological ones.
Delhez, Marie; Hansenne, Michel ULg; Legros, Jean-Jacques ULg

in Psychoneuroendocrinology (2003), 28(7), 863-74

This study examined the psychological symptomatology of men diagnosed with andropause and the association between calculated free testosterone (T) and depressed mood, anxiety and quality of life. Subjects ... [more ▼]

This study examined the psychological symptomatology of men diagnosed with andropause and the association between calculated free testosterone (T) and depressed mood, anxiety and quality of life. Subjects were 153 men, aged 50-70 years, who participated in a screening of andropause. Total testosterone, FSH, LH and SHBG levels were measured. Depressed mood was assessed with the Carroll Rating Scale, anxiety with the "anxiety-insomnia" dimension of the General Health Questionnaire, and quality of life with the World Health Organisation Quality of Life questionnaire. The results showed that levels of free T decreased with age, whereas FSH and LH increased. Carroll Rating Scale scores were higher among hypogonadal subjects, but the mean score was low and not pathological. A negative correlation was observed between severity of depression as assessed by the Carroll Rating Scale and free T levels. However, subjects with a significant score on this scale did not exhibit different free T levels compared to subjects with a non-significant depressive score. Anxiety and quality of life did not differ between hypogonadal and eugonadal subjects. The present study therefore suggests that andropause is not characterised by specific psychological symptoms, but may be associated with "depressive symptoms" that are not considered as pathological. [less ▲]

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See detailReply to Letter to the Editor
PITCHOT, William ULg; ANSSEAU, Marc ULg

in Psychoneuroendocrinology (2001)

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See detailCatecholaminergic function and temperament in major depressive disorder: a negative report.
Hansenne, Michel ULg; Ansseau, Marc ULg

in Psychoneuroendocrinology (1998), 23(5), 477-83

In the biosocial model of Cloninger, the three personality dimensions are related to different central neurotransmission systems. In agreement with this model, a recent study (Wiesbeck et al., 1995 ... [more ▼]

In the biosocial model of Cloninger, the three personality dimensions are related to different central neurotransmission systems. In agreement with this model, a recent study (Wiesbeck et al., 1995) showed an association between growth hormone response to apomorphine, an indirect assessment of the dopaminergic system, and novelty seeking score in alcohol-dependent men. In the present study we investigated the same methodology in a sample of major depressive patients. In addition, we assessed the relationship between noradrenergic function and Cloninger's dimensions using the clonidine test, an indirect assessment of the noradrenergic system. Growth hormone responses to apomorphine and clonidine were not associated with novelty seeking, reward dependence or harm avoidance dimension scores. This study therefore does not confirm the results of Wiesbeck et al. (1995), and does not support an association between noradrenergic activity and reward dependence dimension. However, given the complexity of central neurotransmission systems and the limitations of neuroendocrine challenges for the assessment of those processes, this study could not be considered as definitive evidence against the association between personality dimensions and their hypothesized central substrates. [less ▲]

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See detailPostweaning housing conditions and partner preference and sexual behavior of neonatally ATD-treated male rats.
Bakker, Julie ULg; van Ophemert, J.; Slob, A. K.

in Psychoneuroendocrinology (1995), 20(3), 299-310

Male rats were neonatally treated with cholesterol or a substance that blocks the aromatization of testosterone to estradiol (1,4,6-androstatriene-3,17-dione: ATD). At weaning (21 days) they were either ... [more ▼]

Male rats were neonatally treated with cholesterol or a substance that blocks the aromatization of testosterone to estradiol (1,4,6-androstatriene-3,17-dione: ATD). At weaning (21 days) they were either housed alone or in small groups (2-3 animals) and tested for partner preference behavior (PPB) in adulthood. Choice was between an estrous female and an active male (Part I) and between an estrous female and an ATD-male (Part II). Tests were carried out in a 3-compartment box. Social isolation did not have major effects on PPB except when sexual interaction with the stimulus animals was prevented (Part I). In this case, isolates (ATD and control) showed higher preference scores (PS) for the estrous female and spent less time in the empty middle compartment. When the choice was between an estrous female and an ATD-male, partner PS decreased in all males, most clearly in ATD-males. The latter animals spent more time with the stimulus ATD-male than they had done in previous PPB tests with the normal stimulus male. In contrast to partner preference behaviors, sexual behavior was clearly affected by social isolation. Isolates (ATD and control) displayed lower frequencies of mounts and intromissions. These effects persisted over consecutive tests. Ejaculation was not affected. In conclusion, the present results confirm earlier findings about the significance of neonatal endocrine conditions for the organization of adult PPB in male rats. The presence or absence of social conspecifics after weaning appears to have little influence on adult PPB. [less ▲]

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See detailInhibitory influence of oxytocin infusion on contingent negative variation and some memory tasks in normal men
Geenen, Vincent ULg; Adam, Francine; Baro, Vincent et al

in Psychoneuroendocrinology (1988), 13

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See detailIntranasal oxytocin in obsessive-compulsive disorder
Ansseau, Marc ULg; Legros, Jean-Jacques ULg; Mormont, Christian ULg et al

in Psychoneuroendocrinology (1987), 12

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See detailRelease of human neurophysin I during insulin-induced hypoglycemia is abolished after recovery with clomipramine treatment
Geenen, Vincent ULg; Langer, Gerhard; Koïnig, G. et al

in Psychoneuroendocrinology (1985), 10

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See detailDiagnostic performance of the thirty-four hour dexamethasone suppression test
Ansseau, Marc ULg; Doumont, Arlette; Cerfontaine, Jean-Luc et al

in Psychoneuroendocrinology (1985), 10

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