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See detailSpatial Attention Interacts With Serial-Order Retrieval From Verbal Working Memory
van Dijck, J.-P.; Abrahamse, E. L.; Majerus, Steve ULg et al

in Psychological Science (2013), 24(9), 1854-1859

The ability to maintain the serial order of events is recognized as a major function of working memory. Although general models of working memory postulate a close link between working memory and ... [more ▼]

The ability to maintain the serial order of events is recognized as a major function of working memory. Although general models of working memory postulate a close link between working memory and attention, such a link has so far not been proposed specifically for serial-order working memory. The present study provided the first empirical demonstration of a direct link between serial order in verbal working memory and spatial selective attention. We show that the retrieval of later items of a sequence stored in working memory-compared with that of earlier items-produces covert attentional shifts toward the right. This observation suggests the conceptually surprising notion that serial-order working memory, even for nonspatially defined verbal items, draws on spatial attention. © The Author(s) 2013. [less ▲]

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See detailMoney giveth, money taketh away: The dual effect of wealth on happiness
Quoidbach, Jordi ULg; Dunn, Elisabeth W; Petrides, K. V. et al

in Psychological Science (2010), 21

The present study provides the first evidence that money impairs people’s ability to savor everyday positive emotions and experiences. In a sample of working adults, wealthier individuals reported lower ... [more ▼]

The present study provides the first evidence that money impairs people’s ability to savor everyday positive emotions and experiences. In a sample of working adults, wealthier individuals reported lower savoring ability. Moreover, the negative impact of wealth on savoring undermined the positive effects of money on happiness. Supporting the causal influence of money on savoring, experimentally exposing participants to a reminder of wealth produced the same deleterious effect on savoring as did actual individual differences in wealth. Finally, moving beyond self-report, participants exposed to a reminder of wealth spent less time savoring a piece of chocolate and exhibited reduced enjoyment of it. The present research supplies evidence for the previously untested notion that having access to the best things in life may actually undercut the ability to reap enjoyment from life’s small pleasures. [less ▲]

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