References of "Proteins"
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See detailNMR structure of a phosphatidylethanolamine binding protein from Drosophila
Rautureau, Gilles J P; Vovelle, Francoise; Schoentgen, Francoise et al

in Proteins (2010), 78(6), 1606-1610

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See detailThe Noncatalytic Triad of Alpha-Amylases: A Novel Structural Motif Involved in Conformational Stability
Marx, J. C.; Poncin, J.; Simorre, J. P. et al

in Proteins (2008), 70(2), 320-328

Chloride-activated alpha-amylases contain a noncatalytic triad, independent of the glycosidic active site, perfectly mimicking the catalytic triad of serine-proteases and of other active serine hydrolytic ... [more ▼]

Chloride-activated alpha-amylases contain a noncatalytic triad, independent of the glycosidic active site, perfectly mimicking the catalytic triad of serine-proteases and of other active serine hydrolytic enzymes. Mutagenesis of Glu, His, and Ser residues in various alpha-amylases shows that this pattern is a structural determinant of the enzyme conformation that cannot be altered without losing the intrinsic stability of the protein. (1)H-(15)N NMR spectra of a bacterial alpha-amylase reveal proton signals that are identical with the NMR signature of catalytic triads and especially a deshielded proton involving a protonated histidine and displaying properties similar to that of a low barrier hydrogen bond. It is proposed that the H-bond between His and Glu of the noncatalytic triad is an unusually strong interaction, responsible for the observed NMR signal and for the weak stability of the triad mutants. Furthermore, a stringent template-based search of the Protein Data Bank demonstrated that this motif is not restricted to alpha-amylases, but is also found in 80 structures from 33 different proteins, amongst which SH2 domain-containing proteins are the best representatives. [less ▲]

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See detailThe crystal structure of triosephosphate isomerase (TIM) from Thermotoga maritima: a comparative thermostability structural analysis of ten different TIM structures
Maes, Dominique; Zeelen, Johan P.; Thanki, Narmada et al

in Proteins (1999), 37(3), 441-53

The molecular mechanisms that evolution has been employing to adapt to environmental temperatures are poorly understood. To gain some further insight into this subject we solved the crystal structure of ... [more ▼]

The molecular mechanisms that evolution has been employing to adapt to environmental temperatures are poorly understood. To gain some further insight into this subject we solved the crystal structure of triosephosphate isomerase (TIM) from the hyperthermophilic bacterium Thermotoga maritima (TmTIM). The enzyme is a tetramer, assembled as a dimer of dimers, suggesting that the tetrameric wild-type phosphoglycerate kinase PGK-TIM fusion protein consists of a core of two TIM dimers covalently linked to 4 PGK units. The crystal structure of TmTIM represents the most thermostable TIM presently known in its 3D-structure. It adds to a series of nine known TIM structures from a wide variety of organisms, spanning the range from psychrophiles to hyperthermophiles. Several properties believed to be involved in the adaptation to different temperatures were calculated and compared for all ten structures. No sequence preferences, correlated with thermal stability, were apparent from the amino acid composition or from the analysis of the loops and secondary structure elements of the ten TIMs. A common feature for both psychrophilic and T. maritima TIM is the large number of salt bridges compared with the number found in mesophilic TIMs. In the two thermophilic TIMs, the highest amount of accessible hydrophobic surface is buried during the folding and assembly process. [less ▲]

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See detailMolecular modeling of the amphipathic helices of the plasma apolipoproteins.
Brasseur, Robert ULg; Lins, Laurence ULg; Vanloo, B. et al

in Proteins (1992), 13(3), 246-57

In this paper we propose a classification of the amphipathic helical repeats occurring in the plasma apolipoprotein sequences. It is based upon the calculation of the molecular hydrophobicity potential ... [more ▼]

In this paper we propose a classification of the amphipathic helical repeats occurring in the plasma apolipoprotein sequences. It is based upon the calculation of the molecular hydrophobicity potential around the helical segments. The repeats were identified using a new autocorrelation matrix, based upon similarities of hydrophobic and hydrophilic properties of the amino acid residues within the apolipoprotein sequences. The helices were constructed by molecular modeling, the molecular hydrophobicity potential was calculated, and isopotential contour lines drawn around the helices yielded a three-dimensional visualization of the hydrophobicity potential. Two classes of apolipoproteins could be differentiated by comparing the hydrophobic angles obtained by projection of the isopotential contour lines on a plane perpendicular to the long axis of the helix. The isopotential contour lines around apo AI, AIV, and E are more hydrophilic than hydrophobic, whereas they are of similar intensity for apo AII, CI, and CIII. In both cases discoidal lipid-protein complexes are generated, with the amphipathic helices around the edge of the lipid core. The long axis of the helices is oriented parallel to the phospholipid acyl chains and the hydrophilic side of the helix toward the aqueous phase. As a result of the differences in hydrophobicity potential, the contact between the hydrophobic side of the helices and the phospholipid acyl chains is larger for apo AII, CI, and CIII than for the other apolipoproteins. This might account for the greater stability of the discoidal complexes generated between phospholipids and these apoproteins. [less ▲]

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See detailBeta-lactamase of Bacillus licheniformis 749/C at 2 A resolution.
Moews, P. C.; Knox, J. R.; Dideberg, O. et al

in Proteins (1990), 7(2), 156-71

Two crystal forms (A and B) of the 29,500 Da Class A beta-lactamase (penicillinase) from Bacillus licheniformis 749/C have been examined crystallographically. The structure of B-form crystals has been ... [more ▼]

Two crystal forms (A and B) of the 29,500 Da Class A beta-lactamase (penicillinase) from Bacillus licheniformis 749/C have been examined crystallographically. The structure of B-form crystals has been solved to 2 A resolution, the starting model for which was a 3.5 A structure obtained from A-form crystals. The beta-lactamase has an alpha + beta structure with 11 helices and 5 beta-strands seen also in a penicillin target DD-peptidase of Streptomyces R61. Atomic parameters of the two molecules in the asymmetric unit were refined by simulated annealing at 2.0 A resolution. The R factor is 0.208 for the 27,330 data greater than 3 sigma (F), with water molecules excluded from the model. The catalytic Ser-70 is at the N-terminus of a helix and is within hydrogen bonding distance of conserved Lys-73. Also interacting with the Lys-73 are Asn-132 and the conserved Glu-166, which is on a potentially flexible helix-containing loop. The structure suggests the binding of beta-lactam substrates is facilitated by interactions with Lys-234, Thr-235, and Ala-237 in a conserved beta-strand peptide, which is antiparallel to the beta-lactam's acylamido linkage; an exposed cavity near Asn-170 exists for acylamido substituents. The reactive double bond of clavulanate-type inhibitors may interact with Arg-244 on the fourth beta-strand. A very similar binding site architecture is seen in the DD-peptidase. [less ▲]

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