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See detailHepatic insulin resistance in obese non-diabetic subjects and in type 2 diabetic patients.
Paquot, Nicolas ULg; Scheen, André ULg; Dirlewanger, Mirjam et al

in Obesity Research (2002), 10(3), 129-34

OBJECTIVE: Obese non-diabetic patients are characterized by an extra-hepatic insulin resistance. Whether obese patients also have decreased hepatic insulin sensitivity remains controversial. RESEARCH ... [more ▼]

OBJECTIVE: Obese non-diabetic patients are characterized by an extra-hepatic insulin resistance. Whether obese patients also have decreased hepatic insulin sensitivity remains controversial. RESEARCH METHODS AND PROCEDURES: To estimate their hepatic insulin sensitivity, we measured the rate of exogenous insulin infusion required to maintain mildly elevated glycemia in obese patients with type 2 diabetes, obese non-diabetic patients, and lean control subjects during constant infusions of somatostatin and physiological low-glucagon replacement infusions. To account for differences in insulin concentrations among the three groups of subjects, an additional protocol was also performed in healthy lean subjects with higher insulin infusion rates and exogenous dextrose infusion. RESULTS: The insulin infusion rate required to maintain glycemia at 8.5 mM was increased 4-fold in obese patients with type 2 diabetes and 1.5-fold in obese non-diabetic patients. The net endogenous glucose production (measured with 6,6-(2)H(2)-glucose) and total glucose output (measured with 2-(2)H(1)-glucose) were approximately 30% lower in the patients than in the lean subjects. Net endogenous glucose production and total glucose output were both markedly increased in both groups of obese patients compared with lean control subjects during hyperinsulinemia. DISCUSSION: Our data indicate that both obese non-diabetic and obese type 2 diabetic patients have a blunted suppressive action of insulin on glucose production, indicating hepatic and renal insulin resistance. [less ▲]

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See detailPhysical activity, obesity, and cardiovascular risk factors in children. The Belgian Luxembourg Child Study II.
Guillaume, Michèle ULg; Lapidus, L.; Bjondorp, P. et al

in Obesity Research (1997), 5(6), 549-56

Physical activity was measured in relation to cardiovascular (CV) risk factors in a randomly selected population of 1028 children from Province de Luxembourg in Belgium, a mainly rural area with a high ... [more ▼]

Physical activity was measured in relation to cardiovascular (CV) risk factors in a randomly selected population of 1028 children from Province de Luxembourg in Belgium, a mainly rural area with a high prevalence of such risk factors among adults and children. Physical activity was estimated as participation in sport activities, a major indicator of leisure-time physical activity in schoolchildren, and physical inactivity was estimated as frequency and duration of television (TV) watching. Boys participated more frequently in sport activities than girls did (p = 0.001). A majority of the children watched TV daily. After age adjustment, bodyweight (girls, p < 0.012; boys, p < 0.027) and, in boys, body mass index (BMI) (p < 0.039) were related to days per week of TV watching. No significant relationships with other CV risk factors remained after adjustments for BMI. In analyses of independent contributions of age, TV watching, and sports activity on CV risk factors, age showed highly significant relationships. In boys, TV showed relationships with BMI (p < 0.04) and (borderline) with systolic blood pressure, independent of age and sports activity, whereas the latter was significantly related to subscapular skinfold (p < 0.04) and (borderline) with triceps skinfold and cholesterol. In girls, no significant independent contributions to risk factor associations were found. The father's education was directly associated with sports activities, whereas the mother being a housewife showed negative relationships to physical activity and positive to TV watching in their children, suggesting socioeconomic influence on the activity patterns of children. Furthermore, registrations suggested less physical activity in the most rural part of the area. It is concluded that children in this mainly rural area watch TV frequently. In boys, physical inactivity, measured both as TV watching and as registrations of sports activities, contributes independently to body fat mass. In girls, no contribution or weaker contributions of physical inactivity were found. This suggests that contributory factors leading to obesity might be different in girls and boys. [less ▲]

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See detailPhysical activity and cardiovascular risk factors in children. The Belgian Luxembourg Child Study.
Guillaume, Michèle ULg; Lapidus, L.; Bjorntorp, P.

in Obesity Research (1997)

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See detailObesity and nutrition. The Belgian Luxembourg Child Study.
Guillaume, Michèle ULg; Lapidus, L.; Beckers, F. et al

in Obesity Research (1997)

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See detailUsefulness of fluoxetine in obese non-insulin-dependent diabetics: a multicenter study.
Daubresse, Jean-Claude; Kolanowski, J.; Krzentowski, G. et al

in Obesity Research (1996), 4(4), 391-6

Weight reduction is essential in the management of most non-insulin-dependent diabetics, but this therapeutical goal is difficult to obtain. In this double-blind parallel study, 82 non-insulin-dependent ... [more ▼]

Weight reduction is essential in the management of most non-insulin-dependent diabetics, but this therapeutical goal is difficult to obtain. In this double-blind parallel study, 82 non-insulin-dependent diabetics, moderately obese (BMI = 30 - 39 kg/m2), were given for an 8-week period either placebo (P) or fluoxetine (F), a specific serotonin reuptake inhibitor, in addition to their usual antidiabetic treatment. Thirty-nine of them received 60 mg fluoxetine a day and 43 were given the placebo. At admission, both groups had similar weight excess, metabolic control and serum lipid values. In comparison with the P-treated subjects, those treated with fluoxetine (F) lost more weight after 3 weeks (-1.9 vs. -0.7 kg, p < -0.0009) and after 8 weeks (-3.1 vs. -0.9 kg, p < 0.0007). Fasting blood glucose decreased in group F after 3 weeks (-1.5 vs -0.4 mmol/L, p < 0.003) and after 8 weeks (-1.7 vs. -0.02 mmol/L, p < 0.0004). HbAlc decreased from 8.5% to 7.7% in group F and from 8.6% to 8.3% in group P (p = 0.057). Mean triglyceride level was also reduced in group F after 8 weeks (p = 0.042). Fasting C-peptide did not change in either group, but fasting insulin values decreased in group F after 3 weeks (p < 0.02) and after 8 weeks (p < 0.05). The insulin/C-peptide molar ratio decreased significantly in group F after 3 weeks (p < 0.04) and after 8 weeks (p < 0.05) in comparison with group P. The drug was generally well tolerated and no major side effects were reported. In conclusion, the addition of fluoxetine to the usual oral hypoglycemic agent therapy might be beneficial in obese non-insulin-dependent diabetics, at least on a short-term basis. [less ▲]

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