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See detail18F-fluoride PET/CT for assessing bone involvement in prostate and breast cancers
Withofs, Nadia ULg; Grayet, Benjamin ULg; Tancredi, Tino ULg et al

in Nuclear Medicine Communications (2011), 32(3), 168-176

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See detailPrognostic value of metabolic imaging in non-small cell lung cancers with neoplasic pleural effusion.
Duysinx, Bernard ULg; Corhay, Jean-Louis ULg; Larock, Marie-Paule ULg et al

in Nuclear Medicine Communications (2008), 29(11), 982-6

BACKGROUND: The intensity of the [F]fluorodeoxyglucose (F-FDG) uptake is an independent prognostic indicator in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). We evaluate the relationship between the metabolic ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: The intensity of the [F]fluorodeoxyglucose (F-FDG) uptake is an independent prognostic indicator in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). We evaluate the relationship between the metabolic activity of the primary and the pleurisy in T4 NSCLC. METHODS: 25 patients (16 males, nine females, mean age 63 years, performance status 1) with pathology-proven, T4 NSCLC and malignant pleurisy were included. All were treated by a platinum salt-based chemotherapy regimen. Positron emission tomography (F-FDG-PET) was performed before treatment, according to a routine procedure. Regions of interest were placed over the primary and the pleural effusion on the transaxial slice showing the highest activity. The maximum pixel standard uptake values (SUVs) were calculated. Overall survival was determined by standard Kaplan-Meier survival analysis. All patients were followed up until death. RESULTS: The median survival for the entire population was 83 days (7-988). The SUVs were higher in the primary than in the pleurisy (9.2+/-5.6 and 5.5+/-2.2, respectively). There was no correlation between primary and pleurisy SUVs (r=0.3, P>0.05). The metabolic activity of the primary tumor did not predict the outcome: the median survival was 77.5 days (range 7-988) and 87 days (19-454) in the groups with SUVs lower and higher than the median value (8.7), respectively (P>0.05). By contrast, the metabolic activity of the pleurisy was significantly correlated with the median survival, which was 196 days (40-988) when the SUVs were lower than the median value (5) and 74 days (7-170) when they were higher (P=0.0096). CONCLUSION: Among patients with T4 NSCLC, those with high metabolic activity in the pleural effusion have a dire prognosis, whereas the metabolic activity of the primary fails to predict the survival. [less ▲]

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See detail18f-Fdg Pet Imaging in Assessing Exudative Pleural Effusions
DUYSINX, Bernard ULg; Larock, Marie-Paule ULg; Nguyen, Delphine et al

in Nuclear Medicine Communications (2006), 27(12), 971-6

BACKGROUND: This study evaluates the accuracy of [F]fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (F-FDG PET) imaging with semi-quantitative analysis for differentiating benign from malignant pleural ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: This study evaluates the accuracy of [F]fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (F-FDG PET) imaging with semi-quantitative analysis for differentiating benign from malignant pleural exudates and for guiding the search for the primary tumour of pleural metastases. METHODS: Whole-body 18F-FDG PET was performed in 79 patients with exudative pleurisy. Standard uptake values were normalized for body weight, body surface area, lean body mass (SUVbw, SUVbsa, SUVlbm) with and without correction for blood glucose levels. Thoracoscopy was systematically performed to reveal pathological diagnosis. RESULTS: All SUVs were significantly higher in all malignant pleural diseases (n = 51) than in benign (n = 28) (P < 0.001). Moreover SUVs were greater in the pleural metastases from pulmonary primaries (n = 25) and in mesotheliomas (n = 8) than in extrathoracic primaries (n = 18) (P < 0.01) with no significant difference between lung cancers and mesotheliomas. Receiver operating curve (ROC) analysis between benign and malignant lesions showed areas under the curves that ranged from 0.803 (SUVbsa g) to 0.863 (SUVbw). The cut-off value for SUVbw which gave the best accuracy (82.3%) was 2.2. When comparing thoracic with extrathoracic primaries the highest accuracy (80.4%) was found for a cut-off value of 2.6. CONCLUSION: Semi-quantitative analysis of 18F-FDG PET imaging helps to differentiate malignant from benign pleural exudates and to distinguish between thoracic or extrathoracic primaries. [less ▲]

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See detailWhole-body positron emission tomography using fluorodeoxyglucose in patients with metastases of unknown primary tumours (CUP syndrome)
Alberini, J. L.; Belhocine, Tarik; Hustinx, Roland ULg et al

in Nuclear Medicine Communications (2003), 24(10), 1081-1086

The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical performances of whole body 2-[F-18]fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG PET) imaging for the detection of the primary tumour in patients ... [more ▼]

The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical performances of whole body 2-[F-18]fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG PET) imaging for the detection of the primary tumour in patients with metastases of unknown origin. Forty-one patients, without previous history of known cancer (18 women and 23 men; average age 64.1 years) with metastasis confirmed by histopathological analysis were included in a retrospective study. Results of PET were compared with those of techniques used in the current conventional diagnostic procedure. All known metastatic lesions were detected by PET. There were 26 true-positive and two false-negative results. Primary tumour remained undetermined in eight patients after conventional investigations and PET. PET was superior to conventional diagnostic procedure in 11 patients and led to modify treatment in 11 patients. Sensitivity of PET was superior than computed tomography in detecting abdominal primary tumours. FDG PET is useful in patients with unknown primary tumour because its sensitivity is good and it could modify the disease management. Otherwise, PET allows the evaluation of the extent of the disease and could be used to monitor treatment efficiency. Its contribution has to be evaluated particularly in patients with primary tumour with a specific treatment. ((C) 2003 Lippincott Williams Wilkins). [less ▲]

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See detailFluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography and somatostatin receptor scintigraphy for diagnosing and staging carcinoid tumours: correlations with the pathological indexes p53 and Ki-67
Belhocine, Tarik; Willems, Jacqueline ULg; Rigo, Pierre ULg et al

in Nuclear Medicine Communications (2002), 23(8), 727-734

We performed this study in order to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of whole-body fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG PET) imaging and somatostatin receptor scintigraphy (SRS) for ... [more ▼]

We performed this study in order to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of whole-body fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG PET) imaging and somatostatin receptor scintigraphy (SRS) for localizing primary carcinoid tumours and evaluating the extent of the disease. A secondary aim was to correlate those findings with the histological characteristics of the lesions. FDG PET was performed in 17 patients and SRS in 16. All patients had pathologically proven carcinoids. All lesions were verified by histopathological analysis or by follow-up. Ki-67 and p53 expression were assessed as an indicator of the tumours' aggressiveness. FDG PET correctly identified 4/7 primary tumours and 8/11 metastatic spreads, as compared to six and 10 respectively, for SRS. Most tumours were typical carcinoids with low Ki-67 expression. No correlation was found between the histological features and the tracer's uptake. We conclude that SRS remains the modality of choice for evaluating patients with carcinoid tumours, regardless of their proliferative activity. FDG PET should be reserved to patients with negative results on SRS. ((C) 2002 Lippincott Williams Wilkins). [less ▲]

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See detailWhole-Body 18f-Fdg Pet for the Evaluation of Patients with Hodgkin's Disease and Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma
Jerusalem, Guy ULg; Warland, V.; Najjar, F. et al

in Nuclear Medicine Communications (1999), 20(1), 13-20

Whole-body metabolic information provided by 18F-FDG PET could help in the evaluation of lymphoma patients at diagnosis and follow-up. We studied 60 patients, 42 at initial presentation and 18 for disease ... [more ▼]

Whole-body metabolic information provided by 18F-FDG PET could help in the evaluation of lymphoma patients at diagnosis and follow-up. We studied 60 patients, 42 at initial presentation and 18 for disease recurrence (23 aggressive non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, 21 low-grade non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and 16 Hodgkin's disease). All patients underwent a clinical examination, computed tomography (CT) and a non-attenuated PET scan within 1 week. The patients received 222-296 MBq (6-8 mCi) 18F-FDG intravenously and emission scans were recorded 45-90 min later. 18F-FDG PET detected more lymph nodes than the clinical examination or CT, but this rarely resulted in upstaging (two patients). The concordance between PET and CT for the evaluation of the spleen, liver and digestive tract was quite good. Discordance was noted in 12 patients for the evaluation of bone marrow infiltration, but confirmation by MRI or focal biopsy was not always obtained. We conclude that non-attenuated 18F-FDG PET is an easy and efficient whole-body method for the evaluation of patients with lymphomas. Compared with conventional techniques, however, it does not appear to offer much improvement for staging but provides a satisfactory base for follow-up. [less ▲]

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See detailSpecific uptake of N-isopropyl-p-I-123-iodomphetamine by the adrenal cortex.
Demonceau, G.; Beckers, Albert ULg; Desaive, C. et al

in Nuclear Medicine Communications (1987)

Detailed reference viewed: 7 (1 ULg)