References of "Nature Nanotechnology"
     in
Bookmark and Share    
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailA single synthetic small molecule that generates force against a load
Lussis, Perrine ULg; Svaldo Lanero, Tiziana ULg; Bertocco, Andrea et al

in Nature Nanotechnology (2011), 6

Some biomolecules are able to generate directional forces by rectifying random thermal motions. This allows these molecular machines to perform mechanical tasks such as intracellular cargo transport or ... [more ▼]

Some biomolecules are able to generate directional forces by rectifying random thermal motions. This allows these molecular machines to perform mechanical tasks such as intracellular cargo transport or muscle contraction in plants and animals. Although some artificial molecular machines have been synthesized and used collectively to perform mechanical tasks, so far there have been no direct measurements of mechanical processes at the single-molecule level. Here we report measurements of the mechanical work performed by a synthetic molecule less than 5 nm long. We show that biased Brownian motion of the sub-molecular components in a hydro- gen-bonded [2]rotaxane—a molecular ring threaded onto a molecular axle—can be harnessed to generate significant directional forces. We used the cantilever of an atomic force microscope to apply a mechanical load to the ring during single-molecule pulling–relaxing cycles. The ring was pulled along the axle, away from the thermodynamically favoured binding site, and was then found to travel back to this site against an external load of 30 pN. Using fluctuation theorems, we were able to relate measurements of the work done at the level of individual rotaxane molecules to the free-energy change as previously determined from ensemble measurements. The results show that individual rotaxanes can generate directional forces of similar magnitude to those generated by natural molecular machines. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 107 (34 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailDNA Computing Circuits Using Libraries of DNAzyme Subunits
Elbaz, J.; Lioubashevskia, O.; Remacle, Françoise ULg et al

in Nature Nanotechnology (2010), 5

Detailed reference viewed: 29 (0 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailLogic implementations using a single nanoparticle-protein hybrid
Medalsy, I.; Klein, M.; Heyman, A. et al

in Nature Nanotechnology (2010), 5

Detailed reference viewed: 51 (14 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailMolecular cranes swing into action
Duwez, Anne-Sophie ULg

in Nature Nanotechnology (2008), 3

Atomic force microscopes have exploited the properties of DNA to ‘cut-and-paste’ molecules on surfaces with an accuracy of 10 nm

Detailed reference viewed: 31 (11 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailMechanochemistry: targeted delivery of single molecules
Duwez, Anne-Sophie ULg; Cuenot, Stéphane; Jérôme, Christine ULg et al

in Nature Nanotechnology (2006), 1

The use of scanning probe microscopy-based techniques to manipulate single molecules1 and deliver them in a precisely controlled manner to a specific target represents a significant nanotechnological ... [more ▼]

The use of scanning probe microscopy-based techniques to manipulate single molecules1 and deliver them in a precisely controlled manner to a specific target represents a significant nanotechnological challenge. The ultimate physical limit in the design and fabrication of organic surfaces can be reached using this approach. Here we show that the atomic force microscope (AFM), which has been used extensively to investigate the stretching of individual molecules, can deliver and immobilize single molecules, one at a time, on a surface. Reactive polymer molecules, attached at one end to an AFM tip, are brought into contact with a modified silicon substrate to which they become linked by a chemical reaction. When the AFM tip is pulled away from the surface, the resulting mechanical force causes the weakest bond — the one between the tip and polymer — to break. This process transfers the polymer molecule to the substrate where it can be modified by further chemical reactions [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 10 (4 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailMechanochemistry: targeted delivery of single molecules
Duwez, Anne-Sophie ULg; Cuenot, Stéphane; Jérôme, Christine ULg et al

in Nature Nanotechnology (2006), 1

The use of scanning probe microscopy-based techniques to manipulate single molecules(1) and deliver them in a precisely controlled manner to a specific target represents a significant nanotechnological ... [more ▼]

The use of scanning probe microscopy-based techniques to manipulate single molecules(1) and deliver them in a precisely controlled manner to a specific target represents a significant nanotechnological challenge(2,3). The ultimate physical limit in the design and fabrication of organic surfaces can be reached using this approach. Here we show that the atomic force microscope (AFM), which has been used extensively to investigate the stretching of individual molecules(4-12), can deliver and immobilize single molecules, one at a time, on a surface. Reactive polymer molecules, attached at one end to an AFM tip, are brought into contact with a modified silicon substrate to which they become linked by a chemical reaction. When the AFM tip is pulled away from the surface, the resulting mechanical force causes the weakest bond - the one between the tip and polymer - to break. This process transfers the polymer molecule to the substrate where it can be modified by further chemical reactions. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 79 (42 ULg)