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See detailLoss of the VHR dual-specific phosphatase causes cell-cycle arrest and senescence
Rahmouni, Souad ULg; Cerignoli, Fabio; Alonso, Andres et al

in Nature Cell Biology (2006), 8(5), 524-178

Protein tyrosine phosphatases regulate important processes in eukaryotic cells and have critical functions in many human diseases including diabetes to cancer(1-3). Here, we report that the human Vaccinia ... [more ▼]

Protein tyrosine phosphatases regulate important processes in eukaryotic cells and have critical functions in many human diseases including diabetes to cancer(1-3). Here, we report that the human Vaccinia H1-related (VHR) dual-specific protein tyrosine phosphatase regulates cell-cycle progression and is itself modulated during the cell cycle. Using RNA interference (RNAi), we demonstrate that cells lacking VHR arrest at the G1-S and G2-M transitions of the cell cycle and show the initial signs of senescence, such as flattening, spreading, appearance of autophagosomes, beta-galactosidase staining and decreased telomerase activity. In agreement with this notion, cells lacking VHR were found to upregulate p21(Cip-Waf1), whereas they downregulated the expression of genes for cell-cycle regulators, DNA replication, transcription and mRNA processing. Loss of VHR also caused a several-fold increase in serum-induced activation of its substrates, the mitogen-activated protein ( MAP) kinases Jnk and Erk. VHR-induced cell-cycle arrest was dependent on this hyperactivation of Jnk and Erk, and was reversed by Jnk and Erk inhibition or knock-down. We conclude that VHR is required for cell-cycle progression as it modulates MAP kinase activation in a cell-cycle phase-dependent manner. [less ▲]

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See detailControl of vesicle fusion by a tyrosine phosphatase.
Huynh, Huong; Bottini, Nunzio; Williams, Scott et al

in Nature cell biology (2004), 6(9), 831-9

The tyrosine phosphatase PTP-MEG2 is targeted by its amino-terminal Sec14p homology domain to the membrane of secretory vesicles. There it regulates vesicle size by promoting homotypic vesicle fusion by a ... [more ▼]

The tyrosine phosphatase PTP-MEG2 is targeted by its amino-terminal Sec14p homology domain to the membrane of secretory vesicles. There it regulates vesicle size by promoting homotypic vesicle fusion by a mechanism that requires its catalytic activity. Here, we identify N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor (NSF), a key regulator of vesicle fusion, as a substrate for PTP-MEG2. PTP-MEG2 reduced the phosphotyrosine content of NSF and co-localized with NSF and syntaxin 6 in intact cells. Furthermore, endogenous PTP-MEG2 co-immunoprecipitated with endogenous NSF. Phosphorylation of NSF at Tyr 83, as well as an acidic substitution at the same site, increased its ATPase activity and prevented alphaSNAP binding. Conversely, expression of a Y83F mutant of NSF caused spontaneous fusion events. Our results suggest that the molecular mechanism by which PTP-MEG2 promotes secretory vesicle fusion involves the local release of NSF from a tyrosine-phosphorylated, inactive state. This represents a novel mechanism for localized regulation of NSF and the first demonstrated role for a protein tyrosine phosphatase in the regulated secretory pathway. [less ▲]

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