References of "Nanotechnology"
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See detailFlexible transparent conductive materials based on silver nanowire networks: a review
Langley, Daniel ULg; Giusti, Gael; Mayousse, Céline et al

in Nanotechnology (2013), 24(45), 452001

The class of materials combining high electrical or thermal conductivity, optical transparency and flexibility is crucial for the development of many future electronic and optoelectronic devices. Silver ... [more ▼]

The class of materials combining high electrical or thermal conductivity, optical transparency and flexibility is crucial for the development of many future electronic and optoelectronic devices. Silver nanowire networks show very promising results and represent a viable alternative to the commonly used, scarce and brittle indium tin oxide. The science and technology research of such networks are reviewed to provide a better understanding of the physical and chemical properties of this nanowire-based material while opening attractive new applications. [less ▲]

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See detailCarbon nanotubes randomly decorated with gold clusters: from nano(2)hybrid atomic structures to gas sensing prototypes
Charlier, Jean-Christophe; Arnaud, L.; Avilov, I. V. et al

in Nanotechnology (2009), 20(37),

Carbon nanotube surfaces, activated and randomly decorated with metal nanoclusters, have been studied in uniquely combined theoretical and experimental approaches as prototypes for molecular recognition ... [more ▼]

Carbon nanotube surfaces, activated and randomly decorated with metal nanoclusters, have been studied in uniquely combined theoretical and experimental approaches as prototypes for molecular recognition. The key concept is to shape metallic clusters that donate or accept a fractional charge upon adsorption of a target molecule, and modify the electron transport in the nanotube. The present work focuses on a simple system, carbon nanotubes with gold clusters. The nature of the gold–nanotube interaction is studied using first-principles techniques. The numerical simulations predict the binding and diffusion energies of gold atoms at the tube surface, including realistic atomic models for defects potentially present at the nanotube surface. The atomic structure of the gold nanoclusters and their effect on the intrinsic electronic quantum transport properties of the nanotube are also predicted. Experimentally, multi-wall CNTs are decorated with gold clusters using (1) vacuum evaporation, after activation with an RF oxygen plasma and (2) colloid solution injected into an RF atmospheric plasma; the hybrid systems are accurately characterized using XPS and TEM techniques. The response of gas sensors based on these nano2hybrids is quantified for the detection of toxic species like NO2, CO, C2H5OH and C2H4. [less ▲]

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See detailNanopatterned monolayers of an adsorbed chromophore
Frederich, Nadia; Duwez, Anne-Sophie ULg; Nysten, Bernard et al

in Nanotechnology (2008), 19

A simple lift-off process was developed to rapidly fabricate nanopatterned photofunctional surfaces. Dye molecules of a perylene derivative (PDID) were adsorbed irreversibly on clean silicon through the ... [more ▼]

A simple lift-off process was developed to rapidly fabricate nanopatterned photofunctional surfaces. Dye molecules of a perylene derivative (PDID) were adsorbed irreversibly on clean silicon through the holes of an electron-beam lithographied polymer mask. The subsequent removal of the mask in a proper solvent results in PDID nanosized regions of width as small as 30 nm for stripes and of diameter as small as 120 nm for dots. Numerical analyses of atomic force microscopy and laser-scanning confocal microscopy images show that the dye molecules are confined to the regions defined by the lithographic process, with the integrated fluorescence intensity being essentially proportional to the size of the nanofeatures. This demonstrates that a simple organic lift-off process compatible with clean-room technology, and not involving any chemical step, is able to produce photofunctional nanopatterned surfaces, even though the dye is not chemically bonded to the silicon surface. [less ▲]

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See detailTotal internal reflection sum-frequency generation spectroscopy and dense gold nanoparticles monolayer: a route for probing adsorbed molecules
Tourillon, Gérard; Dreesen, Laurent ULg; Volcke, Cédric et al

in Nanotechnology (2007), 18

We show that sum-frequency generation spectroscopy performed in the total internal reflection configuration (TIR–SFG) combined with a dense gold nanoparticles monolayer allows us to study, with an ... [more ▼]

We show that sum-frequency generation spectroscopy performed in the total internal reflection configuration (TIR–SFG) combined with a dense gold nanoparticles monolayer allows us to study, with an excellent signal to noise ratio and high signal to background ratio, the conformation of adsorbed molecules. Dodecanethiol (DDT) was used as probe molecules in order to assess the potentialities of the approach. An enhancement of more than one order of magnitude of the SFG signals arising from the adsorbed species is observed with the TIR geometry compared to the external reflection one while the SFG non-resonant contribution remains the same for both configurations. Although further work is required to fully understand the origin of the SFG process on nanoparticles, our work opens new possibilities for studying nanostructures. [less ▲]

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See detailSize-selected compound semiconductor quantum dots by nanoparticle conversion
Wacaser, Brent A; Dick, Kimberly A; Zanolli, Zeila ULg et al

in Nanotechnology (2007), 18(10),

We have developed a novel technology, called nanoparticle conversion, for producing compound semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) in which the dot size, surface density, position, and the materials system are ... [more ▼]

We have developed a novel technology, called nanoparticle conversion, for producing compound semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) in which the dot size, surface density, position, and the materials system are all independently controlled. Nanoparticle conversion also lends itself to spatially controlled positioning of QDs. To demonstrate this technology we report the formation of InP QDs using nanoparticle conversion. We have produced QDs on substrates of different types by converting randomly and lithographically positioned nanoparticles into compound semiconductors in a chemical vapour deposition system. Electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy measurements reveal that the morphology of these QDs is similar to that of QDs produced by other techniques. Photo- and cathodoluminescence measurements show that the converted nanoparticles exhibit properties and behaviours typical of semiconductor QDs. These include quantum confinement, free-to-bound recombination and blinking. Production of multi-component QDs like InP, GaN, and InAsP on various substrates like Si, SiO2, and sapphire show that this technology can produce a wide variety of different types of QD on different substrates with minimal need for process optimization. [less ▲]

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