References of "Mycoses"
     in
Bookmark and Share    
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailDNA fingerprinting using Diversilab system for genotyping characterization of Microsporum audouinii and Trichophyton violaceum
SACHELI, Rosalie ULg; DIMO, Lauryl; GRAIDE, Hélène ULg et al

in Mycoses (2013, October 01), 56(Supplement S3), 99

Objectives: To investigate the epidemiological determinants responsible for the high number of anthropophilic dermatophytes received by the National Reference Center for Mycosis of Liege (NRCL) during the ... [more ▼]

Objectives: To investigate the epidemiological determinants responsible for the high number of anthropophilic dermatophytes received by the National Reference Center for Mycosis of Liege (NRCL) during the year 2012. To perform a genotypic characterization by the Diversilab® system focusing on the two main isolated species, Microsporum audouinii and Trichophyton violaceum. To present a preliminary study preceding the national survey launched in 2013. Methods: A total of 51 strains of M. audouinii (50 clinical + 1 reference (ref.) strains) and 15 strains of T. violaceum (14 clinical + 1 ref. strain) originating from different locations through Belgium were included in the study. The fungal strains were first cultivated on Malt agar, then sub-cultured in Sabouraud liquid medium (Fluka). The grown mycelium was processed for DNA extraction following recommendations of the manufacturer (Ultra Clean® DNA Microbial isolation kit, MoBio laboratories). Genotypic analysis was performed using the DiversiLab® system (BioMérieux) for DNA fingerprinting and analysis. Results: Regarding M. audouinii, four different genotypic groups of strains were separated. Group 1 includes 11 strains and is only found in the Liège surroundings. Group 2 includes only one strain with little differences compared to group 1 and collected from the Liège area. These two groups may be related to each other. Group 3 contains 36 strains and the reference strain. This genotype is distributed in different Belgium locations. The last group, group 4, contains only 3 isolates sharing low similarities in comparison with the 3 other groups. Concerning T. violaceum, 6 different genotypic groups with a mixed geographical distribution were determined. Group 1 includes 8 clinical isolates and the ref. strain. The other five isolates are all different and seem not to be related to each other. Conclusion: The automated typing DiversiLab® system proved to be an easy and efficient method to investigate the molecular epidemiology of dermatophytes infections. Preliminary results of the study show that, through Belgium, several groups of isolates co-exist for M. audouinii and T. violaceum providing evidence of genetic heterogeneity. This variation can be related to acquired mutations due to environmental adaptation. Further investigations are necessary to better understand the impact of this genotypic variation. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 54 (11 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailMechanisms of skin adherence and invasion by dermatophytes
Baldo, Aline ULg; Monod, M.; Mathy, Anne ULg et al

in Mycoses (2012), 55(3), 218-223

Detailed reference viewed: 35 (13 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailVentriculitis caused by Aspergillus fumigatus in a child with central nervous system tuberculosis
Antachopoulos, Charalampos; STERGIOPOULOU, Theodouli ULg; Simitsopoulou, Maria et al

in Mycoses (2011), 54(5), 627-30

Detailed reference viewed: 8 (0 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailCharacterization of a new potential virulence factor of Microsporum canis, the secreted subtilisin Sub6
Mathy, Anne ULg; Baldo, Aline ULg; Salamin, K. et al

in Mycoses (2011), 54(suppl 2), 112-113

Detailed reference viewed: 125 (43 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailThe nail under fungal siege in patients with type II diabetes mellitus.
Pierard, Gérald ULg; Pierard, Claudine ULg

in Mycoses (2005), 48(5), 339-42

Few studies have examined the prevalence of onychomycosis among diabetic patients. Given the morbidity linked to onychomycosis, and the ever-growing size of the diabetic population, a better recognition ... [more ▼]

Few studies have examined the prevalence of onychomycosis among diabetic patients. Given the morbidity linked to onychomycosis, and the ever-growing size of the diabetic population, a better recognition of this nail infection is welcome. To revisit the relative prevalence of dermatophyte, yeast and non-dermatophytic mould onychomycoses in diabetic adults in a prospective study using combined histomycology and cultures. Toenail clippings were collected for 3 years in 190 type II diabetic patients (136 men and 54 women) and from an age- and gender-matched group of non-diabetic subjects. All sampled nails showed clinical alterations reminiscent of onychomycosis. Histomycology and cultures were performed on each sample to distinguish onychomycosis from non-infectious onychodystrophy. Compared to non-diabetic subjects with nail alterations, diabetics showed a higher proportion of onychomycosis relative to non-fungal onychodystrophy. Diabetic men suffered more frequently from onychomycosis and onychodystrophy than diabetic women. When considering the nature of the fungal pathogens, dermatophytes predominated largely over yeast and non-dermatophytic moulds, both in diabetic and non-diabetic patients. Diabetic patients, particularly men, are at increased risk of developing onychomycosis. The morbidity linked to this disorder, and its impact on the foot status in diabetic subjects merit to be better appreciated by clinicians. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 23 (1 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailNew insights into the effect of amorolfine nail lacquer.
Flagothier, Caroline ULg; Pierard, Claudine ULg; Pierard, Gérald ULg

in Mycoses (2005), 48(2), 91-4

Despite improvements in antifungal strategies, the outcome of treating onychomycoses often remains uncertain. Several factors account for treatment failure, of which the pharmacokinetics and ... [more ▼]

Despite improvements in antifungal strategies, the outcome of treating onychomycoses often remains uncertain. Several factors account for treatment failure, of which the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of the antifungal are of importance. The taxonomic nature and ungual location of the fungus cannot be neglected, besides the type of nail and its growth rate. In addition, the biological cycle of the fungus and the metabolic activity of the pathogen likely play a marked influence in drug response. The presence of natural antimicrobial peptides in the nail is also probably a key feature controlling the cure rates. There are many outstanding publications that cover the full spectrum of the field. The purpose of this review is to put in perspective some facets of activity of the topical treatment using amorolfine nail laquer. The antifungal activity of the drug is likely less pronounced in onychomycosis than that expected from conventional in vitro studies. However, the nail laquer formulation should reduce the propensity to form antifungal-resistant spores and limit the risk of reinfection. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 48 (0 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailItraconazole corneofungimetry bioassay on Malassezia species.
Pierard, Gérald ULg; Arrese Estrada, Jorge ULg; Pierard, Claudine ULg

in Mycoses (2004), 47(9-10), 418-21

Yeasts of the genus Malassezia are part of the normal skin biocenosis and are involved in a series of distinct skin disorders and specific dermatomycoses in man and animals. Several species are currently ... [more ▼]

Yeasts of the genus Malassezia are part of the normal skin biocenosis and are involved in a series of distinct skin disorders and specific dermatomycoses in man and animals. Several species are currently distinguished. Their relative in vitro susceptibility to antifungals appears different according to the species and to the nature and route of administration of the drug. Corneofungimetry is an ex vivo bioassay allowing to test the fungal response on human stratum corneum following oral intake of a given antifungal by volunteers. Two series of cyanoacrylate skin surface strippings (CSSS) were harvested from the volar forearm of 30 volunteers before and after a 2-week treatment with itraconazole 200 mg daily. They were coated by olive oil and inoculated with suspensions of seven different Malassezia spp. After a 1-week culture on CSSS, the amount of viable yeasts was assessed using neutral red staining assisted by computerized image analysis. Growth of the seven species was not similar on the CSSS from untreated stratum corneum. The ranking order from the most proliferative to the least was M. restricta, M. sympodialis, M. globosa, M. furfur, M. obtusa, M. slooffiae and M. pachydermatis. Their growth was abated to almost the same level after itraconazole treatment. It is concluded that in vivo treatment with itraconazole is highly active against all Malassezia spp. colonizing the human stratum corneum. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 31 (2 ULg)