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See detailDiet composition of young and adult Northern Grey-headed Sparrow Passer griseus and adult Southern Red Bishop Euplectes orix in Burundi
Nasasagare, Régine Pacis; Ntakimazi, Gaspard; Libois, Roland ULg

in Malimbus (2013), 35(1), 1-10

We studied the diet composition of Northern Grey-headed Sparrow Passer griseus and Southern Red Bishop Euplectes orix in four localities of the Rusizi Plain, northwest Burundi. We analyzed crop contents ... [more ▼]

We studied the diet composition of Northern Grey-headed Sparrow Passer griseus and Southern Red Bishop Euplectes orix in four localities of the Rusizi Plain, northwest Burundi. We analyzed crop contents of 100 adults from each of the two species and the composition of food brought by parents to nestlings of the sparrow at ten nests. In all four sites, the sparrow’s diet consisted primarily of rice. The bishop also fed mostly on rice grains but also ate Lepidoptera caterpillars, some other insects and wild grass seeds such as Panicum sp. and Brachiaria sp. For adults of both bird species, there was no significant variation in diet throughout the year. However, the diet of young sparrows was much more diverse and changed from the day of hatching until fledging. On the day of hatching, chicks ate mainly caterpillars but by the tenth day, food items comprised one third caterpillars, one third Orthoptera and the rest of other insects including Odonata, Dictyoptera, Isoptera and adult Lepidoptera. After this and until fledging, the chicks were fed increasingly on rice seeds. Simultaneously, the proportion of caterpillars taken gradually decreased until none was fed to the nestlings at the end of the nestling period. The items brought by parents also varied with time of day, with caterpillars and grasshoppers in higher proportions in the morning, decreasing around mid-day and then increasing in the evening. [less ▲]

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See detailContribution à l’étude de la biologie de reproduction du Martin-pêcheur huppé Alcedo cristata
Kisasa Kafutshi, Robert ULg

in Malimbus (2012), 34

From 2004 to 2009, 127 nests of the Malachite Kingfisher Alcedo cristata were monitored in the Kinshasa region (Democratic Republic of Congo) by counting eggs and ringing chicks and adults. In total, 195 ... [more ▼]

From 2004 to 2009, 127 nests of the Malachite Kingfisher Alcedo cristata were monitored in the Kinshasa region (Democratic Republic of Congo) by counting eggs and ringing chicks and adults. In total, 195 birds (57 adults and 138 fledglings) were ringed, of which all adults and 121 chicks were weighed and measured. The Malachite Kingfisher lays 2–4 eggs that are incubated 15–16 days in the burrow. The nestling period is 16–17 days. Chick metabolic and ecological demands may explain the pattern of growth of the nestlings. [less ▲]

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See detailRéponses du Martin-pêcheur huppé Alcedo cristata à la perturbation de ses sites de nidification
Kisasa Kafutshi, Robert

in Malimbus (2012), 34

From 2004 to 2009, two colonies of Malachite Kingfisher were monitored by ringing the nestlings and adults, counting eggs and observing parental activity at the nests. Results show that 10 % of nests were ... [more ▼]

From 2004 to 2009, two colonies of Malachite Kingfisher were monitored by ringing the nestlings and adults, counting eggs and observing parental activity at the nests. Results show that 10 % of nests were destroyed by people in the Symphonies site as against 78 % in the Monastery site. Consequently, the number of nests available for breeding is lower at Monastery than at Symphonies. The number of fledged chicks per nest at Symphonies was twice that at the Monastery. Site fidelity is higher for the adults in the Symphonies site (26 %) than at the Monastery (11 %). This suggests that the Monastery site is less favourable to the survival of the Malachite Kingfisher than the Symphonies site. The best strategy to protect this species seems to be the maintenance of a good number of nesting sites. [less ▲]

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See detailLe régime alimentaire du Martin-pêcheur huppé Alcedo cristata pendant la période de reproduction dans la région de Kinshasa (R.D. Congo)
Kisasa Kafutshi, Robert ULg

in Malimbus (2012), 34

The diet of the Malachite Kingfisher was investigated by study of 182 regurgitated pellets collected from 65 broods during the nesting period in the rainy seasons from 2004 to 2009, in two sites in the ... [more ▼]

The diet of the Malachite Kingfisher was investigated by study of 182 regurgitated pellets collected from 65 broods during the nesting period in the rainy seasons from 2004 to 2009, in two sites in the Kinshasa area. In total, 2619 undigested remains were identified in the pellets, revealing 1100 prey. The Malachite Kingfisher’s diet is rich and diverse. The prey identified were 92.7 % fishes (Oreochromis niloticus, Gambusia affinis and Hemichromis elongatus), 5.9 % insects (Odonata and Orthoptera) and 0.5 % frogs. [less ▲]

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See detailRéponses du Martin-pêcheur huppé Alcedo cristata à la perturbation de ses sites de nidification
Kisasa Kafutshi, Robert ULg

in Malimbus (2012), 34(28-38),

From 2004 to 2009, two colonies of Malachite Kingfisher were monitored by ringing the nestlings and adults, counting eggs and observing parental activity at the nests. Results show that 10 % of nests were ... [more ▼]

From 2004 to 2009, two colonies of Malachite Kingfisher were monitored by ringing the nestlings and adults, counting eggs and observing parental activity at the nests. Results show that 10 % of nests were destroyed by people in the Symphonies site as against 78 % in the Monastery site. Consequently, the number of nests available for breeding is lower at Monastery than at Symphonies. The number of fledged chicks per nest at Symphonies was twice that at the Monastery. Site fidelity is higher for the adults in the Symphonies site (26 %) than at the Monastery (11 %). This suggests that the Monastery site is less favourable to the survival of the Malachite Kingfisher than the Symphonies site. The best strategy to protect this species seems to be the maintenance of a good number of nesting sites. [less ▲]

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See detailUn oiseau nouveau au Burundi: le Moineau domestique Passer domesticus
Nasasagare, Régine Pacis ULg

in Malimbus (2011), 33(1), 57-58

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