References of "Leukemia"
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See detailNeighboring adipocytes participate in the bone marrow microenvironment of multiple myeloma cells
Caers, Jo; Deleu, S.; Belaid, Zakia ULg et al

in Leukemia (2007), 21(7), 1580-1584

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See detailChimerism and outcomes after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation following nonmyeloablative conditioning
Baron, Frédéric ULg; Sandmaier, B. M.

in Leukemia (2006), 20(10), 1690-1700

Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation ( HCT) following nonmyeloablative conditioning has been extensively evaluated in patients with hematologic malignancies who are ineligible for conventional ... [more ▼]

Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation ( HCT) following nonmyeloablative conditioning has been extensively evaluated in patients with hematologic malignancies who are ineligible for conventional HCT because of age or medical comorbidities. Nonmyeloablative regimens have led to an initial state of mixed hematopoietic chimerism defined as coexistence of donor- and host-derived hematopoiesis. While nonmyeloablative regimens have been associated with reduced regimen-related toxicities in comparison with conventional myeloablative conditioning, graft rejection, graft-versus-host disease ( GVHD), and disease progression have remained significant challenges. In this article, after briefly introducing current techniques for chimerism assessment, we describe factors affecting donor chimerism levels after nonmyeloablative conditioning, and then review data suggesting that chimerism assessment early after HCT might help identify patients at risk for graft rejection, GVHD and relapse/progression. Finally, we discuss how these observations have opened the way to further research protocols evaluating manipulation of postgrafting immunosuppression, and/or infusion of donor immune cells. [less ▲]

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See detailMolecular cytogenetic study of 126 unselected T-ALL cases reveals high incidence of TCR beta locus rearrangements and putative new T-cell oncogenes
Cauwelier, B.; Dastugue, N.; Cools, J. et al

in Leukemia (2006), 20(7), 1238-1244

Chromosomal aberrations of T-cell receptor (TCR) gene loci often involve the TCR alpha delta (14q11) locus and affect various known T-cell oncogenes. A systematic fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH ... [more ▼]

Chromosomal aberrations of T-cell receptor (TCR) gene loci often involve the TCR alpha delta (14q11) locus and affect various known T-cell oncogenes. A systematic fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) screening for the detection of chromosomal aberrations involving the TCR loci, TCRad (14q11), TCR beta (7q34) and TCR gamma (7p14), has not been conducted so far. Therefore, we initiated a screening of 126 T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) and T-cell lymphoblastic lymphoma cases and 19 T-ALL cell lines using FISH break-apart assays for the different TCR loci. Genomic rearrangements of the TCR beta locus were detected in 24/ 126 cases (19%), most of which (58.3%) were not detected upon banding analysis. Breakpoints in the TCR alpha delta locus were detected in 22/ 126 cases (17.4%), whereas standard cytogenetics only detected 14 of these 22 cases. Cryptic TCR alpha delta/ TCR beta chromosome aberrations were thus observed in 22 of 126 cases (17.4%). Some of these chromosome aberrations target new putative T-cell oncogenes at chromosome 11q24, 20p12 and 6q22. Five patients and one cell line carried chromosomal rearrangements affecting both TCR beta and TCR alpha delta loci. In conclusion, this study presents the first inventory of chromosomal rearrangements of TCR loci in T-ALL, revealing an unexpected high number of cryptic chromosomal rearrangements of the TCR beta locus and further broadening the spectrum of genes putatively implicated in T-cell oncogenesis. [less ▲]

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See detailInositide-specific phospholipase c beta1 gene deletion is a rare event in myelodysplastic syndromes.
Herens, Christian ULg; Ketelslegers, O.; Tassin, Françoise ULg et al

in Leukemia (2006), 20(3), 521-2522-3

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See detailHigh doses of transplanted CD34(+) cells are associated with rapid T-cell engraftment and lessened risk of graft rejection, but not more graft-versus-host disease after nonmyeloablative conditioning and unrelated hematopoietic cell transplantation
Baron, Frédéric ULg; Maris, M. B.; Storer, B. E. et al

in Leukemia (2005), 19(5), 822-828

This report examines the impact of graft composition on outcomes in 130 patients with hematological malignancies given unrelated donor granulocyte-colony-stimulating-factor-mobilized peripheral blood ... [more ▼]

This report examines the impact of graft composition on outcomes in 130 patients with hematological malignancies given unrelated donor granulocyte-colony-stimulating-factor-mobilized peripheral blood mononuclear cells (G-PBMC) ( n = 116) or marrow ( n = 14) transplantation after nonmyeloablative conditioning with 90 mg/m(2) fludarabine and 2Gy TBI. The median number of CD34(+) cells transplanted was 6.5 x 10(6)/ kg. Higher numbers of grafted CD14(+) ( P = 0.0008), CD3(+) ( P = 0.0007), CD4(+) ( P = 0.001), CD8(+) ( P = 0.004), CD3 - CD56(+) ( P = 0.003), and CD34(+) ( P = 0.0001) cells were associated with higher levels of day 28 donor T-cell chimerism. Higher numbers of CD14(+) ( P = 0.01) and CD34(+) ( P = 0.0003) cells were associated with rapid achievement of complete donor T-cell chimerism, while high numbers of CD8(+) ( P = 0.005) and CD34(+) ( P = 0.01) cells were associated with low probabilities of graft rejection. When analyses were restricted to G-PBMC recipients, higher numbers of grafted CD34(+) cells were associated with higher levels of day 28 donor T-cell chimerism ( P = 0.01), rapid achievement of complete donor T-cell chimerism ( P = 0.02), and a trend for lower risk for graft rejection ( P = 0.14). There were no associations between any cell subsets and acute or chronic GVHD nor relapse/progression. These data suggest more rapid engraftment of donor T cells and reduced rejection rates could be achieved by increasing the doses of CD34(+) cells in unrelated grafts administered after nonmyeloablative conditioning. [less ▲]

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See detailt(5;14)/HOX11L2-positive T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia. A collaborative study of the Groupe Francais de Cytogenetique Hematologique (GFCH)
Berger, R.; Dastugue, N.; Busson, M. et al

in Leukemia (2003), 17(9), 1851-1857

To accurately estimate the incidence of HOX11L2 expression, and determine the associated cytogenetic features, in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL), the Groupe Francais de Cytogenetique ... [more ▼]

To accurately estimate the incidence of HOX11L2 expression, and determine the associated cytogenetic features, in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL), the Groupe Francais de Cytogenetique Hematologique (GFCH) carried out a retrospective study of both childhood and adult patients. In total, 364 patients were included ( 211 children less than or equal to15 years and 153 adults), and 67 ( 18.5%) [ 47 children ( 22.4%) and 20 adults (13.1%)] were shown to either harbor the t(5; 14) q35; q32) translocation or express the HOX11L2 gene or both. Most of the common hematological parameters did not show significant differences within positive and negative populations, whereas the incidence of CD1a+/CD10+ and cytoplasmic CD3+ patients was significantly higher in positive than in negative children. Out of the 63 positive patients investigated by conventional cytogenetics, 32 exhibited normal karyotype, whereas the others 31 showed clonal chromosome abnormalities, which did not include classical T-ALL specific translocations. Involvement of the RANBP17/HOX11L2 locus was ascertained by fluorescence in situ hybridization in six variant or alternative (three-way translocation or cytogenetic partner other than 14q32) translocations out of the 223 patients. Our results also show that HOX11L2 expression essentially occurs as a result of a 5q35 rearrangement, but is not associated with another identified T-ALL specific recurrent genetic abnormality, such as SIL-TAL fusion or HOX11 expression. [less ▲]

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See detailNF-kappa B2/p100 induces Bcl-2 expression
Viatour, Patrick ULg; Bentires-Alj, Mohamed; Chariot, Alain ULg et al

in Leukemia (2003), 17(7), 1349-1356

The NF-kappaB2/p100 and bcl-3 genes are involved in chromosomal translocations described in chronic lymphocytic leukemias (CLL) and non-Hodgkin's lymphomas, and nuclear factor kappaB (NF-kappaB) protects ... [more ▼]

The NF-kappaB2/p100 and bcl-3 genes are involved in chromosomal translocations described in chronic lymphocytic leukemias (CLL) and non-Hodgkin's lymphomas, and nuclear factor kappaB (NF-kappaB) protects cancer cells against apoptosis. Therefore, we investigated whether this transcription factor could modulate the expression of the Bcl-2 antiapoptotic protein. Bcl-2 promoter analysis showed multiple putative NF-kappaB binding sites. Transfection assays of bcl-2 promoter constructs in HCT116 cells showed that NF-kappaB can indeed transactivate bcl-2. We identified a kappaB site located at position -180 that can only be bound and transactivated by p50 or p52 homodimers. As p50 and p52 homodimers are devoid of any transactivating domains, we showed that they can transactivate the bcl-2 promoter through association with Bcl-3. We also observed that stable overexpression of p100 and its processed product p52 can induce endogenous Bcl-2 expression in MCF7AZ breast cancer cells. Finally, we demonstrated that, in breast cancer and leukemic cells ( CLL), high NF-kappaB2/p100 expression was associated with high Bcl-2 expression. Our data suggest that Bcl-2 could be an in vivo target gene for NF-kappaB2/p100. [less ▲]

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See detailThe stem cell mobilizing capacity of patients with acute myeloid leukemia in complete remission correlates with relapse risk: results of the EORTC-GIMEMA AML-10 trial
Keating, S.; Suciu, S.; de Witte, T. et al

in Leukemia (2003), 17(1), 60-67

Variable numbers of CD34(+) cells can be harvested from the blood of AML patients in CR after G-CSF supported mobilization following consolidation chemotherapy. We hypothesized that a decreased ability to ... [more ▼]

Variable numbers of CD34(+) cells can be harvested from the blood of AML patients in CR after G-CSF supported mobilization following consolidation chemotherapy. We hypothesized that a decreased ability to mobilize stem cells reflects a chemotherapy-induced reduction in the number of normal and leukemic stem cells. We therefore analyzed whether the mobilizing capacity of these patients was of prognostic significance. 342 AML-patients in first CR received daily G-CSF from day 20 of the consolidation course and underwent 1-6 aphereses to obtain a minimum dose of 2 x 10(6) CD34(+) cells/kg. Afterwards they were randomized for autologous bone marrow (M) or blood SCT. As a surrogate marker for the mobilizing capacity, the highest yield of CD34(+) cells of a single apheresis was adopted. Patients could be categorized into four groups: no harvest (n = 76), low yield (<1 x 10(6) CD34(+)/kg; n = 50), intermediate yield (1-6.9 x 10(6) CD34(+) cells/kg; n = 128) and high yield ( :7 x 106 CD34+ cells/kg; n = 88). The median follow-up was 3.4 years; 163 relapses and 16 deaths in CR were reported. Autologous blood or BM SCT was performed in 36%, 64%, 81% and 88%, respectively, of the patients assigned to the no harvest, low, intermediate and high CD34(+) yield group. The 3-year disease-free survival rate was 46.7%, 65.0%, 50.4% and 26.9% (P= 0.0002) and the relapse incidence was 47.5%, 30.1%, 43.1% and 71.9% (P < 0.0001). Multivariate Cox's proportional hazards model showed that the CD34(+) yield was the most important independent prognostic variable (P = 0.005) after cytogenetics. Patients with the highest mobilizing capacity have a poor prognosis due to an increased relapse incidence. [less ▲]

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