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See detailFRACTIONATED STEREOTACTIC RADIOTHERAPY TREATMENT OF CAVERNOUS SINUS MENINGIOMAS: A STUDY OF 100 CASES
Litré, Claude Fabien ULg; COLIN, P; NOUDEL, R et al

in International Journal of Radiation, Oncology, Biology, Physics (2009), 74(4), 1012-7

Purpose:We discuss our experiences with fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSR) in the treatment of cavernous sinus meningiomas. Methods and Materials: From 1995 to 2006, we monitored 100 patients ... [more ▼]

Purpose:We discuss our experiences with fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSR) in the treatment of cavernous sinus meningiomas. Methods and Materials: From 1995 to 2006, we monitored 100 patients diagnosed with cavernous sinus meningiomas; 84 female and 16 male patients were included. The mean patient age was 56 years. The most common symptoms were a reduction in visual acuity (57%), diplopia (50%), exophthalmy (30%), and trigeminal neuralgia (34%). Surgery was initially performed on 26 patients. All patients were treated with FSR. A total of 45 Gy was administered to the lesion, with 5 fractions of 1.8 Gy completed each week. Patient treatment was performed using a Varian Clinac linear accelerator used for cranial treatments and a micro-multileaf collimator. Results: No side effects were reported. Mean follow-up period was 33 months, with 20% of patients undergoing follow-up evaluation of more than 4 years later. The tumor control rate at 3 years was 94%. Three patients required microsurgical intervention because FSR proved ineffective. In terms of functional symptoms, an 81% improvement was observed in patients suffering from exophthalmy, with 46% of these patients being restored to full health. A 52% improvement was observed in diplopia, together with a 67% improvement in visual acuity and a 50% improvement in type V neuropathy. Conclusions: FSR facilitates tumor control, either as an initial treatment option or in combination with microsurgery. In addition to being a safe procedure with few side effects, FSR offers the significant benefit of superior functional outcomes. [less ▲]

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See detailAnalysis of Dose Volume Histogram Differences between High Dose Rate Brachytherapy and Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy for Prostate Treatment
Hermesse, Johanne ULg; Thissen, Benedicte ULg; Warlimont, Bernard ULg et al

in International Journal of Radiation, Oncology, Biology, Physics (2008), 72(1 (supplément)), 566

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See detailAdjuvant stereotactic permanent seed breast implant: A boost series in view of partial breast irradiation
Jansen, Nicolas ULg; Deneufbourg, Jean-Marie ULg; Nickers, Philippe ULg

in International Journal of Radiation, Oncology, Biology, Physics (2007), 67(4), 1052-1058

Purpose: The aim of this study was to use permanent seed implants in the breast and describe our experience with 15 cases, using iodine seed implants as a tumor bed boost. Methods and Materials: Breasts ... [more ▼]

Purpose: The aim of this study was to use permanent seed implants in the breast and describe our experience with 15 cases, using iodine seed implants as a tumor bed boost. Methods and Materials: Breasts were fixed with a thermoplastic sheet, a template bridge applied, the thorax scanned and the images rotated to be perpendicular to the implant axis. Skin, heart, and lung were delineated. A preplan was made, prescribing 50 Gy to the clinical target volume (CTV), consisting in this boost series of nearly a quadrant. Iodine (125) seeds were stereotactically implanted through the template, and results were checked with a postplan computed tomographic (CT) scan. Results: The breast was immobilized reproducibly. Simulation, scanning, and implant were performed without difficulties. Preplan CTV D90% (the dose delivered to 90% of the CTV) was 66 Gy, and postoperative fluoroscopic or CT scan checks were satisfactory. Pre- and postplan dose-volume histogram showed good organ sparing: mean postplan skin, heart, and lung V30 Gy (the organ volume receiving a dose of 30 Gy) of 2 +/- 2.2 mL, 0.24 +/- 0.34 mL, and 3.5 +/- 5 mL, respectively. No short-term toxicity above Grade I was noted, except for transient Grade 3 neuropathy in 1 patient. Conclusions: Seeds remained in the right place, as assessed by fluoroscopy, absence of significant pre- to postplan dose-volume histogram change for critical organs, and total irradiated breast volume. The method could be proposed as a boost when high dosimetric selectivity is required (young patients after cardiotoxic chemotherapy for left-sided cancer). This boost series was a preliminary step before testing partial breast irradiation by permanent seed implant in a prospective trial. (c) 2007 Elsevier Inc. [less ▲]

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See detailEfficacy and Morbidity of a Novel Induction Treatment in Locally Advanced Non Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC)
Barthelemy, Nicole ULg; Rinken, F.; Dekoster, Guy ULg et al

in International Journal of Radiation, Oncology, Biology, Physics (2006), 66(3), 476-477

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See detailPrognostic value of PSA nadir < or =4 ng/ml within 4 months of high-dose radiotherapy for locally advanced prostate cancer
Nickers, Philippe ULg; Albert, Adelin ULg; Waltregny, David ULg et al

in International Journal of Radiation, Oncology, Biology, Physics (2006), 65(1), 73-77

PURPOSE: To investigate early prostate-specific antigen (PSA) kinetics after high radiation doses of 85 Gy on locally advanced prostate cancer. METHODS AND MATERIALS: A total of 201 patients were ... [more ▼]

PURPOSE: To investigate early prostate-specific antigen (PSA) kinetics after high radiation doses of 85 Gy on locally advanced prostate cancer. METHODS AND MATERIALS: A total of 201 patients were prospectively and consecutively treated with external beam radiotherapy and a brachytherapy boost. Of the 201 patients, 104 received concomitant hormonal therapy on the decision of the referring urologist and were excluded, yielding a study population of 97 patients. The first posttreatment PSA analysis was performed not earlier than 1 month after treatment completion but within the first 4 months, and then every 4 months. Analysis of PSA kinetics included the PSA nadir (nPSA) at values of < or =4 ng/mL to < or =0.5 ng/mL. The nPSA at < or =4 ng/mL within 4 months (nPSA < or =4/4m) was the variable of interest. RESULTS: We established highly significant associations between an nPSA of < or =1 and < or =0.5 ng/mL and the nPSA < or =4/4m (p <0.0001). A hazard ratio of 0.33 (95% Confidence Interval (CI), 0.12-0.91) underlined the lower risk of recurrence related to nPSA < or =4/4m achievement (p = 0.033). Using time-dependent covariate models for patients who did not reach an nPSA < or =4/4m, an nPSA of < or =1 ng/mL remained without prognostic significance (p = 0.06). However, for patients who reached an nPSA < or =4/4m, an nPSA of < or =1 ng/mL did significantly improve the prognosis (p <0.001), but much later after treatment. The same analysis was repeated for nPSA < or =0.5 ng/mL with similar conclusions as when nPSA < or =4/4m was obtained (p <0.01). CONCLUSION: The nPSA < or =4/4m has been demonstrated to be a significant predictor of biochemical no evidence of disease after high radiation doses of 85 Gy. Its major advantage is that it was available earlier than the other nadirs. [less ▲]

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See detailInduced acute erythema and late pigmentation may not be correlated: In regards to Perera et al. (Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys 2005;62:1283-1290)
Nemeskéri, C.; Póti, Z.; Mayer, A. et al

in International Journal of Radiation, Oncology, Biology, Physics (2006), 65(1), 309-310

[No abstract available]

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See detailDetermination of TGF-β1 plasma levels. Authors' reply
Barthelemy, Nicole ULg; De Jaeger, Katrien; SEPPENWOOLDE, Yvette et al

in International Journal of Radiation, Oncology, Biology, Physics (2004), 60(4), 1339

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See detailIncreased IL-6 and TGF-beta(1) concentrations in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid associated with thoracic radiotherapy
Barthelemy-Brichant, Nicole ULg; Bosquee, Lionel; Cataldo, Didier ULg et al

in International Journal of Radiation, Oncology, Biology, Physics (2004), 58(3), 758-767

PURPOSE: To assess, in lung cancer patients, the effects of thoracic radiotherapy (RT) on the concentrations of transforming growth factor-beta(1) (TGF-beta(1)) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) in the ... [more ▼]

PURPOSE: To assess, in lung cancer patients, the effects of thoracic radiotherapy (RT) on the concentrations of transforming growth factor-beta(1) (TGF-beta(1)) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) in the bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid. METHODS AND MATERIALS: Eleven patients with lung cancer requiring RT as part of their treatment were studied. BAL was performed bilaterally before, during, and 1, 3, and 6 months after RT. Before each BAL session, the patient's status was assessed clinically using pulmonary function tests and an adapted late effects on normal tissue-subjective, objective, management, analytic (LENT-SOMA) scale, including subjective and objective alterations. The National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria were used to grade pneumonitis. The TGF-beta(1) and IL-6 levels in the BAL fluid were determined using the Easia kit. RESULTS: The TGF-beta(1) and IL-6 concentrations in the BAL fluid recovered from the irradiated areas were significantly increased by thoracic RT. The increase in TGF-beta(1) levels tended to be greater in the group of patients who developed severe pneumonitis. In the BAL fluid from the nonirradiated areas, the TGF-beta(1) and IL-6 concentrations remained unchanged. CONCLUSION: The observed increase in TGF-beta(1) and IL-6 concentrations in the BAL fluid recovered from the irradiated lung areas demonstrated that these cytokines may contribute to the process leading to a radiation response in human lung tissue. [less ▲]

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See detailRENO, a European Postmarket Surveillance Registry, confirms effectiveness of coronary brachytheraypy in routine clinical practice.
Coen, V; Serruys, P; Sauerwein, W et al

in International Journal of Radiation, Oncology, Biology, Physics (2003), 55(4), 1019-1026

Purpose: To assess, by a European registry trial, the clinical event rate in patients with discrete stenotic lesions of coronary arteries (de novo or restenotic) in single or multiple vessels (native or ... [more ▼]

Purpose: To assess, by a European registry trial, the clinical event rate in patients with discrete stenotic lesions of coronary arteries (de novo or restenotic) in single or multiple vessels (native or bypass grafts) treated with -radiation. Methods and Materials: Between April 1999 and September 2000, 1098 consecutive patients treated in 46 centers in Europe and the Middle East with the Novoste Beta-Cath System were included in Registry Novoste (RENO). Results: Six-month follow-up data were obtained for 1085 patients. Of 1174 target lesions, 94.1% were located in native vessels and 5.9% in a bypass graft; 17.7% were de novo lesions, 4.1% were restenotic, and 77.7% were in-stent restenotic lesions. Intravascular brachytherapy was technically successful in 95.9% of lesions. Multisegmental irradiation, using a manual pullback stepping maneuver to treat longer lesions, was used in 16.3% of the procedures. The in-hospital rate of major adverse cardiac events was 1.8%. At 6 months, the rate was 18.7%. Angiographic follow-up was available for 70.4% of the patients. Nonocclusive restenosis was seen in 18.8% and total occlusion in 5.7% of patients. A combined end point for late (30–180 days) definitive or suspected target vessel closure was reached in 5.4%, but with only 2% of clinical events. Multivariate analysis was performed for major adverse cardiac events and late thrombosis. Conclusion: Data obtained from the multicenter RENO registry study, derived from a large cohort of unselected consecutive patients, suggest that the good results of recent randomized controlled clinical trials can be replicated in routine clinical practice. © 2003 Elsevier Science Inc. [less ▲]

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See detailPreoperative hyperfractionated acclerated radiotherapy (HART) and concomittant CPT-11 in advanced rectal carcinoma. A phase I study.
Voelter, V; Stupp, R; Matter, M et al

in International Journal of Radiation, Oncology, Biology, Physics (2003), 56(5), 1288-1294

Purpose: Patients with locally advanced rectal carcinoma are at risk for both local recurrence and distant metastases. We demonstrated the efficacy of preoperative hyperfractionated accelerated ... [more ▼]

Purpose: Patients with locally advanced rectal carcinoma are at risk for both local recurrence and distant metastases. We demonstrated the efficacy of preoperative hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy (HART). In this Phase I trial, we aimed at introducing chemotherapy early in the treatment course with both intrinsic antitumor activity and a radiosensitizer effect. Methods and Materials: Twenty-eight patients (19 males; median age 63, range 28–75) with advanced rectal carcinoma (cT3: 24; cT4: 4; cN : 12; M1: 5) were enrolled, including 8 patients treated at the maximally tolerated dose. Escalating doses of CPT-11 (30–105 mg/m2/week) were given on Days 1, 8, and 15, and concomitant HART (41.6 Gy, 1.6 Gy bid 13 days) started on Day 8. Surgery was to be performed within 1 week after the end of radiochemotherapy. Results: Twenty-six patients completed all preoperative radiochemotherapy as scheduled; all patients underwent surgery. Dose-limiting toxicity was diarrhea Grade 3 occurring at dose level 6 (105 mg/m2). Hematotoxicity was mild, with only 1 patient experiencing Grade 3 neutropenia. Postoperative complications (30 days) occurred in 7 patients, with an anastomotic leak rate of 22%. Conclusions: The recommended Phase II dose of CPT-11 in this setting is 90 mg/m2/week. Further Phase II exploration at this dose is warranted. © 2003 Elsevier Inc. [less ▲]

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See detailProspective studyof CD4 and CD8 T-lynphocyte apoptosis as a marker for radiation induced late effects in 399 individual patients
Ozsahin; Crompton; Shi et al

in International Journal of Radiation, Oncology, Biology, Physics (2003), 55(2), 551-552

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See detailYoung Investigators Workshop participants (P.A Coucke) and N. Coleman : Radiation Research program, Radiation Oncology Sciences Program, National Cancer Institue, Nih, August 1-2, 2000
Coucke, Philippe ULg

in International Journal of Radiation, Oncology, Biology, Physics (2001), 49(5), 1505-1516

INTRODUCTION The one-and-a-half day Young Investigators Workshop was held in the Holiday Inn, Bethesda, August 1–2, 2000. Using the SCAROP mailing list and recommendations from department chiefs ... [more ▼]

INTRODUCTION The one-and-a-half day Young Investigators Workshop was held in the Holiday Inn, Bethesda, August 1–2, 2000. Using the SCAROP mailing list and recommendations from department chiefs, approximately 55 “early-career” physicianscientists were invited to attend the workshop. Table 1 includes the participants. The goals of the meeting were: c To bring together radiation oncology physician-scientists who were in the early part of their career to discuss research ideas and opportunities as well as potential barriers to progress for the field and for young-investigator careers. c To help develop camaraderie among and a critical-mass of a new generation of physician-scientists with interests ranging from technology development, to basic and translational research, to outcomes research and analysis. c To help the young investigators gain familiarity with the NIH grant programs. c To prepare a “white paper” with their vision and ideas for potential opportunities for the future. If possible, a shortand long-term agenda were to be proposed. The first morning included presentations from a variety of NCI programs. Three breakout sessions were held in the afternoon. Breakout Group Reports were discussed by the entire group the following morning. A fourth discussion topic on “Barriers To a Successful Research Career” was conducted by the entire group. Drafts of this entire Workshop Report were circulated to the participants. The final document represents the efforts of the entire Young Investigators Workshop and provides the perspective from the point of view of the investigators who have many years to invest in the future of radiation oncology. The Radiation Research Program (RRP) is grateful to all the participants for a lively workshop and to the session co-chairs for the timely preparation of this report. [less ▲]

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See detailIn vitro modulation of radiosenitizing effect of FMdC. The importance of simultaneous alteration of the novo and salvage pathways to deoxyribonucleosides.
COUCKE, Philippe ULg; Cottin, E; Ciernick, I-F et al

in International Journal of Radiation, Oncology, Biology, Physics (2000), 46(3),

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See detailCombination of FMdC, Tirapazamine (SR4233) and irradiation in vitro
COUCKE, Philippe ULg; Cottin, E; Stern, S et al

in International Journal of Radiation, Oncology, Biology, Physics (2000), 46(3),

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See detailAltered apoptotic profiles in irradiated patients with increased toxicity.
Crompton, Nigel; Miralbell, Raymond; Rutz, Hans-Peter et al

in International Journal of Radiation, Oncology, Biology, Physics (1999), 45(3), 707-714

Purpose: A retrospective study of radiation-induced apoptosis in CD4 and CD8 T-lymphocytes, from 12 cancer patients who displayed enhanced toxicity to radiation therapy and 9 ataxia telangiectasia ... [more ▼]

Purpose: A retrospective study of radiation-induced apoptosis in CD4 and CD8 T-lymphocytes, from 12 cancer patients who displayed enhanced toxicity to radiation therapy and 9 ataxia telangiectasia patients, was performed to test for altered response compared to healthy blood-donors and normal cancer patients. Methods and Materials: Three milliliters of heparinized blood from each donor was sent via express post to the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) for subsequent examination. The blood was diluted 1:10 in RPMI medium, irradiated with 0-, 2-, or 9-Gy X-rays, and incubated for 48 h. CD4 and CD8 T-lymphocytes were then labeled using FITC-conjugated antibodies, erythrocytes were lysed, and the DNA stained with propidium iodide. Subsequently, cells were analyzed using a Becton Dickinson FACScan flow cytometer. Radiation-induced apoptosis was recognized in leukocytes as reduced DNA content attributed to apoptosis-associated changes in chromatin structure. Apoptosis was confirmed by light microscopy, electron microscopy, and by the use of commercially available apoptosis detection kits (in situ nick translation and Annexin V). Data from hypersensitive individuals were compared to a standard database of 105 healthy blood-donors, and a database of 48 cancer patient blood donors who displayed normal toxicity to radiation therapy. To integrate radiosensitivity results from CD4 and CD8 T-lymphocytes after 2 and 9 Gy, z-score analyses were performed. Results: A cohort of 12 hypersensitive patients was evaluated; 8 showed enhanced early toxicity, 3 showed enhanced late toxicity, and 1 showed both. The cohort displayed less radiation-induced apoptosis (21.8 s) than average age-matched donors. A cohort of 9 ataxia telangiectasia homozygotes displayed even less apoptosis (23.6 s). Conclusion: The leukocyte apoptosis assay appears to be a useful predictor of individuals likely to display increased toxicity to radiation therapy; however, validation of this requires a prospective study. © 1999 Elsevier Science Inc. [less ▲]

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See detailHyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy (HART) for inoperable, non metastatic non-small-cell lung carcinoma of the lung (NSCLC): result of a phase II study for patients ineligible for combination radio-chemotherapy.
Koutaissoff, S; Wellmann, D; COUCKE, Philippe ULg et al

in International Journal of Radiation, Oncology, Biology, Physics (1999), 45(5), 1151-1156

Purpose: To evaluate a hyperfractionated and accelerated radiotherapy (HART) protocol in patients with inoperable non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) who were ineligible for combination ... [more ▼]

Purpose: To evaluate a hyperfractionated and accelerated radiotherapy (HART) protocol in patients with inoperable non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) who were ineligible for combination radiochemotherapy studies. Methods and Materials: From February 1989 through August 1994, 23 patients ineligible for available combined modality protocols in our institution were enrolled and treated with HART, consisting of 63 Gy given in 42 fractions of 1.5 Gy each, twice daily, with a minimum time interval of 6 h between fractions, 5 days a week, over an elapsed time of 4.2 weeks, or 29 days. There was no planned interruption. Results: The 1-, 2-, and 3-year survival rates were 61%, 39%, and 19%, respectively, with a median survival of 16.8 months. At the time of analysis, 4 patients are alive and 19 have died, 16 from NSCLC and 3 from cardiacdisease. Overall response rate was 48%, with 22% of patients achieving a complete response and 26% a partial response. Correlation between acute response rate and survival was poor. First site of relapse was local-regional in 8 patients (35%), distant in 6 patients (26%), and local-regional and distant in 4 (17%) patients. One patient had Grade IV and 2 had Grade III esophagitis. One patient presented with chronic Grade III lung toxicity. There were no treatment-related deaths. Conclusion: In this group of 23 patients ineligible for radiochemotherapy, this HART regime was quite feasible and was followed by little toxicity. Results in this particularly poor prognosis NSCLC patient category should be compared to series with a similar patient profile; however, median survival is at least similar to that obtained in recent series of combination radiochemotherapy. © 1999 Elsevier Science Inc. [less ▲]

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See detailAltered apoptotic profiles in irradiated patients with increased toxicity
Ozsahin, Mahmut; Miralbell, Raymond; Emery, Gillian et al

in International Journal of Radiation, Oncology, Biology, Physics (1998), 42(Supplément), 135

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See detailSeminoma arising in corrected and uncorrected inguinal cryptorchidism: Treatment and prognosis in 66 patients
Li; COUCKE, Philippe ULg; Tu-Nan, Qian et al

in International Journal of Radiation, Oncology, Biology, Physics (1997), 38(2), 343-350

Image : The purpose of this study was to analyze prognosis and treatment results for seminoma arising in corrected and uncorrected inguinal cryptorchidism (SCIC and SUIC). Image : We reviewed 66 patients ... [more ▼]

Image : The purpose of this study was to analyze prognosis and treatment results for seminoma arising in corrected and uncorrected inguinal cryptorchidism (SCIC and SUIC). Image : We reviewed 66 patients with inguinal seminomas between June 1958 and December 1991 at the Cancer Hospital and Institute of Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences. Of these patients, 23 had prior orchiopexy and 43 presented with an inguinal form of cryptorchidism. At presentation, 17 of 66 (26%) patients had nodal metastases. This nodal involvement was 30% (7 of 23) for SCIC and 23% (10 of 43) for SUIC, respectively. These numbers are comparable with those in a series of patients treated for scrotal seminoma at our institution (26% vs. 20%). However, 3 of 23 (13%) patients who had prior orchiopexy presented with inguinal nodal metastasis as compared with 0 of 43 patients with SUIC or 4 of 237 patients with scrotal seminoma (p < 0.5). There were 49 stage I, 5 stage IIA, 8 stage IIB, 3 stage III, and 1 stage IV patients. All patients underwent radical orchiectomy and received further radiotherapy, chemotherapy, or both. Patients with stage I and stage II disease were treated primarily with radiotherapy, whereas patients with stage III and IV disease were treated with chemotherapy. Image : The overall and disease-free survival at 5 and 10 years was 94% and 92%, 89% and 87%, respectively. The overall 5- and 10-year survival by stage was 100% and 100% for stage I, and 77% and 68% for stage II, respectively (p < .05). There was no significant difference in survival between SUIC and SCIC (93% vs. 96% at 5 years). Four patients developed relapse. Two of these four patients experienced relapse at the inguinal area, due to a marginal miss. Three of four patients with relapse were successfully salvaged, and one died of disease. Image : Our results indicate that prognosis for inguinal seminoma is excellent and similar to that of scrotal seminoma. Postorchiectomy radiotherapy can be considered as the standard treatment for stage I and IIA inguinal seminoma. We recommend routinely including the para-aortic and ipsilateral pelvic nodes. [less ▲]

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See detailSeminoma arising in corrected and uncorrected inguinal cryptorchidism: treatment and prognosis in 66 patients
Li, Y-X; COUCKE, Philippe ULg; Qian, T-L et al

in International Journal of Radiation, Oncology, Biology, Physics (1997), 36

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to analyze prognosis and treatment results for seminoma arising in corrected and uncorrected inguinal cryptorchidism (SCIC and SUIC). Methods and Materials: We ... [more ▼]

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to analyze prognosis and treatment results for seminoma arising in corrected and uncorrected inguinal cryptorchidism (SCIC and SUIC). Methods and Materials: We reviewed 66 patients with inguinal seminomas between June 1958 and December 1991 at the Cancer Hospital and Institute of Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences. Of these patients, 23 had prior orchiopexy and 43 presented with an inguinal form of cryptorchidism. At presentation, 17 of 66 (26%) patients had nodal metastases. This nodal involvement was 30% (7 of 23) for SCIC and 23% (10 of 43) for SUIC, respectively. These numbers are comparable with those in a series of patients treated for scrotal seminoma at our institution (26% vs. 20%). However, 3 of 23 (13%) patients who had prior orchiopexy presented with inguinal nodal metastasis as compared with 0 of 43 patients with SUIC or 4 of 237 patients with scrotal seminoma (p < .05). There were 49 stage I, 5 stage IIA, 8 stage IIB, 3 stage III, and 1 stage IV patients. All patients underwent radical orchiectomy and received further radiotherapy, chemotherapy, or both. Patients with stage I and stage II disease were treated primarily with radiotherapy, whereas patients with stage III and IV disease were treated with chemotherapy. Results: The overall and disease-free survival at 5 and 10 years was 94% and 92%, 89% and 87%, respectively. The overall 5- and lo-year survival by stage was 100% and 100% for stage I, and 77% and 68% for stage II, respectively @ < .05). There was no significant difference in survival between SUIC and SCIC (93% vs. 96% at 5 years). Four patients developed relapse. Two of these four patients experienced relapse at the inguinal area, due to a marginal miss. Three of four patients with relapse were successfully salvaged, and one died of disease. Conclusion: Our results indicate that prognosis for inguinal seminoma is excellent and similar to that of scrotal seminoma. Postorchiectomy radiotherapy can be considered as the standard treatment for stage I and IIA inguinal seminoma. We recommend routinely including the para-aortic and ipsilateral pelvic nodes. 0 1997 Elsevier Science Inc. [less ▲]

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