References of "International Journal of Primatology"
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See detailChanges in Activity Patterns and Intergroup Relationships After a Significant Mortality Event in Commensal Long- Tailed Macaques (Macaca Fascicularis) in Bali, Indonesia
Brotcorne, Fany ULg; Fuentes, Agustin; Wandia, I Nengah et al

in International Journal of Primatology (2015), 36(3), 548566

Little is known regarding behavioral and social responses of free-ranging primates to demographic changes emerging from significant mortality events. Here, we report on the activity patterns and ... [more ▼]

Little is known regarding behavioral and social responses of free-ranging primates to demographic changes emerging from significant mortality events. Here, we report on the activity patterns and intergroup sociospatial relationships in a commensal population of long-tailed macaques (Macaca fascicularis) in Bali, Indonesia, that underwent a significant mortality event in summer 2012. During the period of interest, we noted heightened mortality in three of the five social groups present in this population, with adult females and juveniles experiencing higher mortality rates than adult and subadult males. Limited diagnostic data regarding pathogen identification and a lack of any conclusive etiology of the deaths prevent our ascertainment of the agent(s) responsible for the observed mortality, but given the characteristics of the event we assume it was caused by a transmissible disease outbreak. Comparing the pre- and postmortality event periods, we found significant differences in activity patterns, including a decreased proportion of affiliation in adult females. This result is likely indicative of enhanced social instability induced by the high mortality of adult females that constitute the stable core of macaque social structure. A higher social tension between groups after the mortality event was indicated by more frequent and intense agonistic intergroup encounters. Intergroup conflict success was inversely proportional to the rate of mortality a group suffered. Our results illustrate how changes in demographic structure caused by significant mortality events may have substantial consequences on behavior and social dynamics in primate groups and at the level of a population. [less ▲]

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See detailFood provioning influences ranging patterns in northern pigtailed macaques (Macaca leonina)
Huynen, Marie-Claude ULg; Savini, Tommaso ULg; Asensio, Norberto et al

in International Journal of Primatology (2015, January)

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See detailInfluence of food resources on the ranging pattern of Northern pig-tailed macaques (Macaca leonina)
Albert, Aurelie; Huynen, Marie-Claude ULg; Savini, Tommaso et al

in International Journal of Primatology (2013)

Food availability may influence primates’ home range size and use. Understanding this relationship may facilitate the design of conservation strategies. We aimed to determine how fruit availability ... [more ▼]

Food availability may influence primates’ home range size and use. Understanding this relationship may facilitate the design of conservation strategies. We aimed to determine how fruit availability influences the ranging patterns of a group of northern pig-tailed macaques (Macaca leonina) living around the visitor center of Khao Yai National Park, Thailand. We predicted that macaques would increase their range during low fruit abundance periods to gather high-quality food and that they would go where there are more fruits or more fruits of particular species. We also predicted that human food, linked to human pre sence, would attract the macaques. We followed the macaques and recorded their diet and movements within their home range. We superimposed a grid on kernels defining the monthly home range surface to compare spatially macaques’ travel and the availability of fruits measured on botanical transects. Our results showed that the macaques increased their monthly home range in March, probably to obtain newly available fruits. During high fruit abundance seasons, they spent more time near particular fruit species. In August and September, although fruits became rare again, macaques kept their home range large, perhaps to find enough fruits as supplies dwindled. Finally, from October to February, they decreased their monthly home range size while consuming human food, a highquality item. In conclusion, the macaques used several ranging strategies according to fruit availability. however, we think that, without human food, macaques would tend to increase their range during low fruit abundance periods, as predicted. [less ▲]

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See detailFrugivory and seed dispersal by northern pigtailed macaques, Macaca leonina, in Thailand
Albert, Aurélie; Hambuckers, Alain ULg; Culot, Laurence ULg et al

in International Journal of Primatology (2013), 33

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See detailEffect of resting patterns of tamarins (Saguinus fuscicollis and Saguinus mystax) on the spatial distribution of seeds and seedling recruitment
Muñoz Lazo, Fernando J. J.; Culot, Laurence ULg; Huynen, Marie-Claude ULg et al

in International Journal of Primatology (2011), 32(1), 223-237

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See detailSeasonal variation in seed dispersal by tamarins alters seed rain in a secondary rainforest
Culot, Laurence ULg; Muñoz Lazo, Fernando J. J.; Huynen, Marie-Claude ULg et al

in International Journal of Primatology (2010), 31

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