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See detailPost-embryonic development of sheepshead minnow Cyprinodon variegatus: a staging tool based on externally visible anatomical traits
Schnitzler, Joseph ULg; Dussenne, Mélanie ULg; Frederich, Bruno ULg et al

in Ichthyological Research (in press)

The sheepshead minnow Cyprinodon variegatus has become a favoured model for laboratory studies because of their small size, rapid development, and tolerance of laboratory conditions. Here, we analyse ... [more ▼]

The sheepshead minnow Cyprinodon variegatus has become a favoured model for laboratory studies because of their small size, rapid development, and tolerance of laboratory conditions. Here, we analyse sheepshead minnow post-embryonic development with the goal of providing a generally useful method for staging fish after embryogenesis. Groups of three females and two males were placed in breeding chambers designed for this experiment. More than 100 eggs were collected and maintained in seawater. Embryos were selected under a dissection microscope and placed in incubation dishes (50 per dish) at 26 °C. On day six, embryos hatched and larvae were transferred to 1 L beakers. To define a simplified normalization table for sheepshead minnow development, we measured each fish for its standard length and examined the fish for four externally evident traits: pigmentation pattern, caudal fin morphology, anal fin morphology, and dorsal fin morphology. The four traits were chosen, because they are easily visualized with standard laboratory equipment such as the stereomicroscope and camera. We have provided criteria for staging sheepshead minnows in studies of post-embryonic development. Our data suggest that dorsal and anal fin morphology may serve as a useful phenotype for defining metamorphic climax stages throughout post-embryonic development in C. variegatus. The staging systems we propose should facilitate detailed anatomical and developmental analyses in relation to ecotoxicological studies on potential disruption of the thyroid axis by xenobiotics and endocrine-disrupting compounds. [less ▲]

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See detailUnique morphologies of Encheliophis vermiops (Carapidae) with revised diagnosis of the genus
Parmentier, Eric ULg; Lanterbecq, Déborah; Todesco, Maité ULg et al

in Ichthyological Research (2010), 57(1), 85-90

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See detailTrophic niches of thirteen damselfishes (Pomacentridae) at the Grand Récif of Toliara, Madagascar
Frederich, Bruno ULg; Fabri, Grégory ULg; Lepoint, Gilles ULg et al

in Ichthyological Research (2009), 56

The damselfishes, with more than 340 species, constitute one of the most important families that live in the coral reef environment. Most of our knowledge of reef-fish ecology is based on this family, but ... [more ▼]

The damselfishes, with more than 340 species, constitute one of the most important families that live in the coral reef environment. Most of our knowledge of reef-fish ecology is based on this family, but their trophic ecology is poorly understood. The aim of the present study was to determine the trophic niches of 13 sympatric species of damselfishes by combining stable isotope (d15N and d13C) and stomach content analyses. Isotopic signatures reveal three main groups according to their foraging strategies: pelagic feeders (Abudefduf sexfasciatus, A. sparoides, A. vaigiensis, Chromis ternatensis, C. dimidiata, Dascyllus trimaculatus and Pomacentrus caeruleus), benthic feeders (Chrysiptera unimaculata, Plectroglyphidodon lacrymatus and Amphiprion akallopisos) and an intermediate group (D. aruanus, P. baenschi and P. trilineatus). Stomach contents reveal that planktonic copepods and filamentous algae mainly represent the diets of pelagic feeders and benthic feeders, respectively. The intermediate position of the third group resulted from a partitioning of small planktonic prey, small vagile invertebrates and filamentous algae. In this last feeding group, the presence of a wide range of d13C values in P. trilineatus suggests a larger trophic niche width, related to diet-switching over time. Some general considerations about the feeding habits of damselfishes reveal that their choice of habitat on the reef and their behavior appear to be good predictors of diet in this group. Benthic (algae and/or small invertebrates) feeders appear to be solitary and defend a small territory on the bottom; zooplankton feeders remain in groups just above the reef, in the water column. [less ▲]

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