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See detailAn active bacterial community linked to high chl-a concentrations in Antarctic winter-pack ice and evidence for the development of an anaerobic sea-ice bacterial community
Eronen-Rasimus, Eeva; Luhtanen, Anne-Mari; Rintala, Janne-Markus et al

in ISME Journal (The) (2017), 1-11

Antarctic sea-ice bacterial community composition and dynamics in various developmental stages were investigated during the austral winter in 2013. Thick snow cover likely insulated the ice, leading to ... [more ▼]

Antarctic sea-ice bacterial community composition and dynamics in various developmental stages were investigated during the austral winter in 2013. Thick snow cover likely insulated the ice, leading to high (o4 μg l–1) chlorophyll-a (chl-a) concentrations and consequent bacterial production. Typical sea-ice bacterial genera, for example, Octadecabacter, Polaribacter and Glaciecola, often abundant in spring and summer during the sea-ice algal bloom, predominated in the communities. The variability in bacterial community composition in the different ice types was mainly explained by the chl-a concentrations, suggesting that as in spring and summer sea ice, the sea-ice bacteria and algae may also be coupled during the Antarctic winter. Coupling between the bacterial community and sea-ice algae was further supported by significant correlations between bacterial abundance and production with chl-a. In addition, sulphate-reducing bacteria (for example, Desulforhopalus) together with odour of H2S were observed in thick, apparently anoxic ice, suggesting that the development of the anaerobic bacterial community may occur in sea ice under suitable conditions. In all, the results show that bacterial community in Antarctic sea ice can stay active throughout the winter period and thus possible future warming of sea ice and consequent increase in bacterial production may lead to changes in bacteria-mediated processes in the Antarctic sea-ice zone. [less ▲]

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See detailInorganic carbon fixation by chemosynthetic ectosymbionts and nutritional transfers to the hydrothermal vent host-shrimp Rimicaris exoculata
Ponsard, Julie ULg; Cambon-Bonavita, Marie-Anne; Zbinden, Magali et al

in ISME Journal (The) (2013), 7

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See detailInsights into bacterial cellulose biosynthesis by functional metagenomics on Antarctic soil samples.
Berlemont, Renaud ULg; Delsaute, Maud ULg; Pipers, Delphine ULg et al

in ISME Journal (The) (2009), 3(9), 1070-1081

In this study, the mining of an Antarctic soil sample by functional metagenomics allowed the isolation of a cold-adapted protein (RBcel1) that hydrolyzes only carboxymethyl cellulose. The new enzyme is ... [more ▼]

In this study, the mining of an Antarctic soil sample by functional metagenomics allowed the isolation of a cold-adapted protein (RBcel1) that hydrolyzes only carboxymethyl cellulose. The new enzyme is related to family 5 of the glycosyl hydrolase (GH5) protein from Pseudomonas stutzeri (Pst_2494) and does not possess a carbohydrate-binding domain. The protein was produced and purified to homogeneity. RBcel1 displayed an endoglucanase activity, producing cellobiose and cellotriose, using carboxymethyl cellulose as a substrate. Moreover, the study of pH and the thermal dependence of the hydrolytic activity shows that RBcel1 was active from pH 6 to pH 9 and remained significantly active when temperature decreased (18% of activity at 10 degrees C). It is interesting that RBcel1 was able to synthetize non-reticulated cellulose using cellobiose as a substrate. Moreover, by a combination of bioinformatics and enzyme analysis, the physiological relevance of the RBcel1 protein and its mesophilic homologous Pst_2494 protein from P. stutzeri, A1501, was established as the key enzymes involved in the production of cellulose by bacteria. In addition, RBcel1 and Pst_2494 are the two primary enzymes belonging to the GH5 family involved in this process.The ISME Journal advance online publication, 21 May 2009; doi:10.1038/ismej.2009.48. [less ▲]

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