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See detailSustained effeciveness of occipital nerve stimulation in drug-resistant chronic cluster headache
MAGIS, Delphine ULg; Gerardy, Pierre-Yves; Remacle, Jean-Michel et al

in Headache (2011)

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See detailA randomized double-blind placebo-controlled trial of thioctic acid in migraine prophylaxis
Magis, Delphine ULg; Ambrosini, Anna; Sandor, Peter et al

in Headache (2007), 47(1), 52-57

BACKGROUND: Impaired mitochondrial phosphorylation potential may play a role in migraine pathogenesis. Metabolic enhancers, such as riboflavin or coenzyme Q, are effective in migraine prophylaxis and ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: Impaired mitochondrial phosphorylation potential may play a role in migraine pathogenesis. Metabolic enhancers, such as riboflavin or coenzyme Q, are effective in migraine prophylaxis and quasi-devoid of adverse effects. Thioctic acid (-lipoic acid) is another substance known to enhance energy metabolism in mitochondria and to be beneficial in diabetic neuropathy. OBJECTIVE: After an open pilot study suggesting its therapeutic antimigraine potentials, we embarked therefore in a randomized controlled trial of thioctic acid (Thioctacid) in migraine prophylaxis steered by the Belgian Headache Society. METHODS: Five Belgian centers recruited 54 migraineurs (43 migraine without aura, 11 with aura; mean age 38 +/- 8 years; 7 males). After a 1-month single-blinded run-in period, 44 patients received either placebo (n = 18) or thioctic acid 600 mg p.o./day (n = 26) for 3 months. RESULTS: Statistical analysis was carried out on an intention-to-treat basis. Monthly attack frequency tended to be reduced between run-in and the 3rd month of treatment in the thioctic acid group compared to placebo (P= .06). The proportion of 50% responders was not significantly different between thioctic acid (30.8%) and placebo (27.8%). Within-group analyses showed a significant reduction of attack frequency (P= .005), headache days (P= .009), and headache severity (P= .03) in patients treated with thioctic acid for 3 months, while these outcome measures remained unchanged in the placebo group. No adverse effects were reported. For logistical reasons this trial was interrupted before the planned 80 patients were enrolled. CONCLUSION: Albeit underpowered, this study tends to indicate that thioctic acid may be beneficial in migraine prophylaxis. Before any firm conclusion can be drawn, however, a large multicenter trial is necessary. [less ▲]

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See detailNociceptive blink reflex and visual evoked potential habituations are correlated in migraine
Di Clemente, Laura; Coppola, Gianluca; Magis, Delphine ULg et al

in Headache (2005), 45(10, Nov-Dec), 1388-1393

BACKGROUND: Lack of habituation, as reported in migraine patients between attacks for evoked cortical responses, was also recently found for the nociceptive blink reflex (nBR) mediated by brainstem ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: Lack of habituation, as reported in migraine patients between attacks for evoked cortical responses, was also recently found for the nociceptive blink reflex (nBR) mediated by brainstem neurons. It is not known if both brain stem and cortical habituation deficits are correlated in the same patient, which would favor a common underlying mechanism. OBJECTIVE: To search for intraindividual correlations between habituation of pattern reversal-visual evoked potentials and that of the nociception-specific blink reflex in migraineurs and in healthy volunteers (HV). METHODS: We recorded 15 HV and 15 migraine without aura patients between attacks. Habituation for visual evoked potentials was measured by comparing the N1-P1 amplitude change (%) between the first and sixth block of 100 sequential averaged responses. Habituation for the nBR was defined as the percentage change of the R2 response area between the 1st and 10th block of five averaged EMG responses, elicited by stimulating the right side every 2 minutes for 32 minutes. We also calculated the slope of N1-P1 amplitude and R2 response area changes from the first to the last response and the correlation with attack frequency. RESULTS: A significant habituation deficit in both cortical and brain stem evoked activity characterized on average the group of migraineurs compared to controls. In migraine patients, but not in HV, we found a significant positive correlation between habituation of pattern reversal-visual evoked potentials and that of the nociception-specific blink reflex both for the degree of habituation between first and last blocks of averagings (r = 0.703; P = .003) and for the habituation slope (r = 0.751; P = .001). Moreover, nBR habituation was positively correlated with attack frequency (r = 0.548; P = .034). CONCLUSION: The positive correlation between visual evoked potential and nBR habituations is consistent with the idea that in migraine the same neurobiological dysfunction might be responsible for the habituation deficit both in cortex and brain stem. As nBR habituation increases with attack frequency, its interictal deficit is unlikely to be due to trigeminal sensitization. [less ▲]

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See detailComparative efficacy of eletriptan 40 mg versus sumatriptan 100 mg
Mathew, N. T.; Schoenen, Jean ULg; Winner, P. et al

in Headache (2003), 43(3), 214-222

Objective.-To confirm the efficacy advantage of eletriptan 40 mg over sumatriptan 100 mg. Background.-Eletriptan 80 mg has demonstrated significantly greater efficacy when compared to both sumatriptan 50 ... [more ▼]

Objective.-To confirm the efficacy advantage of eletriptan 40 mg over sumatriptan 100 mg. Background.-Eletriptan 80 mg has demonstrated significantly greater efficacy when compared to both sumatriptan 50 mg and 100 mg in two studies. Eletriptan 40 mg demonstrated significantly greater efficacy than sumatriptan 100 mg in one previous trial. Methods.-Two thousand one hundred thirteen patients with a diagnosis of migraine according to International Headache Society criteria were randomized using a double-blind, double-dummy, parallel-group design, and treated for a single migraine attack with either eletriptan 40 mg, sumatriptan 100 mg, or placebo. The primary endpoint was 2-hour headache response. Secondary endpoints included headache response rates at 1 hour, pain-free rates, absence of associated symptoms, functional response at 1 and 2 hours, and sustained headache response. Results.-Headache response rates at 2 hours postdose were significantly higher for eletriptan 40 mg (67%) than for sumatriptan 100 mg (59%; P<.001) and placebo (26%; P <.0001). Eletriptan 40 mg consistently showed significant (P<.01) efficacy over sumatriptan 100 mg across secondary clinical outcomes, including 1-hour headache response; 2-hour pain-free response; absence of nausea, photophobia, and phonophobia; functional improvement; use of rescue medication; treatment acceptability; and sustained headache response (P<.05). Overall, treatment-related adverse events were low, nausea being the only adverse event with an incidence of 2% or higher (4.9% with eletriptan, 4.2% sumatriptan, 2.8% placebo). Conclusion.-This trial confirmed that eletriptan 40 mg offers superior efficacy in treating migraine pain and associated symptoms and in restoring patient functioning when compared with sumatriptan 100 mg. [less ▲]

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See detailGenetics of migraine: Possible links to neurophysiological abnormalities
Sandor, P. S.; Ambrosini, A.; Agosti, R. M. et al

in Headache (2002), 42(5), 365-377

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See detailProphylactic Treatment of Migraine with Beta-Blockers and Riboflavin: Differential Effects on the Intensity Dependence of Auditory Evoked Cortical Potentials
Sandor, P. S.; Afra, J.; Ambrosini, A. et al

in Headache (2000), 40(1), 30-5

OBJECTIVE: To investigate the influence of different pharmacological treatments on the intensity dependence of auditory evoked cortical potentials in migraineurs. BACKGROUND: Between attacks, patients ... [more ▼]

OBJECTIVE: To investigate the influence of different pharmacological treatments on the intensity dependence of auditory evoked cortical potentials in migraineurs. BACKGROUND: Between attacks, patients with migraine show abnormalities in cortical information processing and decreased brain mitochondrial energy reserve. Both are most probably relevant for migraine pathogenesis, and they could be differentially modified by prophylactic drug therapy. Design.-The intensity dependence of the auditory evoked cortical potentials is, on average, increased in migraine. We have studied this intensity dependence in 26 patients before and after a 4-month period of prophylaxis with beta-blockers (n = 11, all migraine without aura; metoprolol or bisoprolol) or riboflavin (n = 15, migraine without aura: 13, migraine with aura: 2). Recordings were performed at least 3 days before or after an attack. RESULTS: After the treatment with beta-blockers, the intensity dependence of the auditory evoked cortical potentials was significantly decreased (before: 1.66+/-1.02 microV/10 dB; after: 0.79+/-1.06 microV/10 dB, P=.02). The decrease in intensity dependence was correlated significantly with clinical improvement (r = .69, P = .02). There was no change in intensity dependence after riboflavin treatment (before: 1.80+/-0.81 microV/10 dB; after: 1.56+/-0.83 microV/10 dB, P = .39), although the majority of patients showed improvement. CONCLUSIONS: These results confirm that beta-blockers and riboflavin act on two distinct pathophysiological mechanisms. Combining both treatments might enhance their efficacy without increasing central nervous system side effects. [less ▲]

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See detailInfluence of colors on habituation of visual evoked potentials in patients with migraine with aura and in healthy volunteers.
Afra, J; Ambrosini, A; Génicot, Roger ULg et al

in Headache (2000), 40(1), 36-40

OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether colored glasses influence the habituation of visual evoked potentials. BACKGROUND: We have previously shown that during pattern-reversal stimulations lasting 2 minutes ... [more ▼]

OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether colored glasses influence the habituation of visual evoked potentials. BACKGROUND: We have previously shown that during pattern-reversal stimulations lasting 2 minutes the amplitude of the visual evoked potential increases in migraine with and without aura between attacks, whereas it decreases in healthy volunteers. Red light was found to increase visually evoked EEG fast activity only in children with migraine with aura. Wearing rose-tinted glasses for 4 months decreased attack frequency in parallel with a reduction of the visually evoked EEG fast activity. METHODS: We compared the change in amplitude of the visual evoked potential using five different tinted glasses in 12 patients with migraine with aura and in 10 healthy volunteers. During continuous stimulation at 3.1 Hz, five blocks of 50 responses were sequentially averaged using red, yellow, green, blue, and grey glasses and without glasses in a random order and analyzed in terms of latencies and N1-P1 amplitudes. Amplitude changes were calculated for each block by comparison with the first block in every condition and analyzed statistically using Zerbe's method. RESULTS: In healthy volunteers, the visual evoked potential amplitude increased with red glasses compared to without glasses (P = .05) or with green glasses (P = .03). In patients with migraine with aura, no significant difference was detected using colored glasses. Our findings in healthy volunteers are in line with earlier reports of increased excitability of the human visual cortex when exposed to red light. The lack of such a pattern in patients with migraine with aura suggests that the visual cortex is interictally hypoexcitable rather than hyperexcitable, which is consistent with studies of transcranial magnetic stimulation. [less ▲]

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See detailSpecificity and Sensitivity of Temporalis Es2 Measurements in the Diagnosis of Chronic Primary Headaches
Wang, W.; De Pasqua, Victor ULg; Gérard, P. et al

in Headache (1995), 35(2), 85-8

We have evaluated the specificity and sensitivity of temporalis ES2 measurements for the diagnosis of primary headaches. Ninety-four outpatients diagnosed according to IHS criteria were prospectively ... [more ▼]

We have evaluated the specificity and sensitivity of temporalis ES2 measurements for the diagnosis of primary headaches. Ninety-four outpatients diagnosed according to IHS criteria were prospectively included: 25 had chronic tension-type headache (code 2.2.), 15 episodic tension-type headache (code 2.1.), 20 migraine without aura (code 1.1.) and 34 chronic daily headaches with daily analgesics/ergotamine abuse (code 8.2.). In chronic tension-type, the sensitivity of the ES2 test was 84% at the 0.1 and the 0.5 Hz, but only 56% at the 2Hz stimulation rates. Its specificity was 100% at 0.1Hz, 90% at 0.5Hz and 95% at 2Hz compared to migraine; positive predictive values were at similar levels. Sensitivity of ES2 at 0.1 Hz was 67% in episodic tension-type headache, but its positive predictive value versus migraine was excellent. Comparing chronic tension-type headache and analgesic abusers, the specificity and positive predictive value of the ES2 test for diagnosing chronic tension-type headache were less satisfactory (60%) while the negative predictive values, however, remained good (83% at 0.1Hz). The results confirm that the temporalis ES2 test has a higher diagnostic sensitivity in chronic and episodic tension-type headache, but that it has a high negative predictive value for both types of tension-type headache compared to other primary headaches. For diagnostic purposes, the 0.1Hz stimulation rate seems optimal. The 2Hz stimulation rate is the least sensitive, although it may induce total disappearance of ES2 in up to 40% of patients. ES2 is of limited usefulness for separating chronic tension-type headache and chronic drug-abuse headache, possibly because the latter group comprises both tension-type headache and migraine patients. [less ▲]

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See detailExteroceptive suppression of temporalis muscle activity in patients with chronic headache and in normal volunteers: methodology, clinical and pathophysiological relevance.
Schoenen, Jean ULg

in Headache (1993), 33(1), 3-17

Exteroceptive suppression of temporalis muscle activity was studied in patients with chronic headache and in healthy controls. Among different methods of recording, averaging 10 full-wave rectified EMG ... [more ▼]

Exteroceptive suppression of temporalis muscle activity was studied in patients with chronic headache and in healthy controls. Among different methods of recording, averaging 10 full-wave rectified EMG responses produces results with acceptable variability and discomfort. The late temporalis exteroceptive suppression period (ES2) is reduced on average in patients with chronic tension-type headache; this finding has been reproduced by several independent laboratories. Mean duration of temporalis ES2 is also diminished, but to a lesser degree, in daily drug abuse headache and, as shown by others, in episodic tension-type headache. It is normal in migraine between attacks, cluster headache and various types of symptomatic headaches. Temporalis ES2 may be decreased in untreated patients with major depression. In healthy volunteers, temporalis ES2 duration is reduced by a short-lasting painful stimulus to peripheral limbs after a delay of 50 to 60 ms, and by a sub-motor threshold electromagnetic stimulation to the contralateral cerebral cortex after a delay of 20 to 30 ms. In contrast, long-lasting trains of peripheral painful stimuli have no effect. Various pharmacological agents are able to modify temporalis ES2. Its duration is increased by 5-HT antagonists, but decreased by 5-HT uptake blockers. Pharmacological effects may differ between controls and patients. Considering these results and available data on the anatomo-functional organization of masticatory reflexes, we postulate that temporalis ES2 is a marker of the excitability of interneuronal nets in the ponto-medullary reticular formation. In chronic tension-type headache, excitability of these interneurons is decreased because of inadequate control by the serotonergic raphe magnus nucleus and the periaqueductal gray matter. Dysfunctioning of the latter structures might be caused by abnormal limbic inputs to the brain stem. Some steps of this pathophysiological hypothesis can be verified by modern neurophysiological techniques. [less ▲]

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See detailExteroceptive suppression of temporalis muscle activity in various types of headache.
Paulus, W.; Raubuchl, O.; Straube, A. et al

in Headache (1992), 32(1), 41-4

Exteroceptive suppression (ES) of temporalis muscle activity, particularly the multisynaptic ES2, has been reported to be significantly reduced in tension type headache, but not in migraine. We re ... [more ▼]

Exteroceptive suppression (ES) of temporalis muscle activity, particularly the multisynaptic ES2, has been reported to be significantly reduced in tension type headache, but not in migraine. We re-evaluated the methods of optimally analysing the single shock technique and its intra- and inter-individual variability in 26 normal subjects. These data were compared with the results in patients with migraine, post-lumbar puncture headache, headache due to meningitis, tension-type headaches in HIV infection and patients with symptomatic headache of various etiologies. ES2 was absent in about 50% of tension-type headache patients, but only in one normal subject. With the methods used here and when patients with absent ES2 were excluded, mean duration of ES2 was not significantly different between the various groups. It seems therefore necessary, in spite of increased discomfort for patients, to use complementary methods, such as averaging 16-32 responses and applying various stimulation sets, if one wants to increase the potency of temporalis ES2 as a diagnostic and pathophysiologic tool in headache. [less ▲]

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See detailEmg Activity in Pericranial Muscles During Postural Variation and Mental Activity in Healthy Volunteers and Patients with Chronic Tension Type Headache
Schoenen, Jean ULg; Gérard, P.; De Pasqua, Victor ULg et al

in Headache (1991), 31(5), 321-4

EMG activity was recorded over frontalis, temporalis and trapezius muscles in a supine position, a standing position and during a mental task in 32 female patients suffering from chronic tension-type ... [more ▼]

EMG activity was recorded over frontalis, temporalis and trapezius muscles in a supine position, a standing position and during a mental task in 32 female patients suffering from chronic tension-type headache and in 20 healthy volunteers. Measurements in patients were made before and after biofeedback therapy. All EMG levels were on average significantly higher in patients than in controls. 62.5% of patients had at least one abnormal EMG level, but only 34% were beyond the normal range, if 1 muscle and 1 recording condition was considered. EMG levels were not correlated with headache severity, anxiety or response to biofeedback treatment. It is therefore suggested that pericranial EMG activity is not pathogenetic in chronic tension type headache, but merely one of several pathophysiologic changes, that are produced by a central dysfunction. [less ▲]

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See detailContingent Negative Variation in Migraine
Bocker, K. B.; Timsit-Berthier, M.; Schoenen, Jean ULg et al

in Headache (1990), 30(9), 604-9

The Contingent Negative Variation (CNV) is an event-related slow potential. It was recorded in healthy volunteers (n = 8) and in patients suffering from migraine without (n = 12) or with (n = 5) aura ... [more ▼]

The Contingent Negative Variation (CNV) is an event-related slow potential. It was recorded in healthy volunteers (n = 8) and in patients suffering from migraine without (n = 12) or with (n = 5) aura, during one (CNV1) and three second (CNV3) foreperiods in a forewarned reaction time task. CNV1 was recorded at the vertex while CNV3 was recorded at multiple electrode sites to assess topographical differences. Seven out of twelve migraine patients without aura had increased CNV1 amplitudes. CNV3 amplitudes were increased as well, but only at electrode positions C3 and C4 and not at Fz. CNV3, which allows for analysis of both an early and a late CNV component, could improve the discrimination of migraine without aura beyond that of CNV1. In migraine with aura all CNV parameters were at control levels, confirming previous results. The data obtained are discussed in terms of arousal, activation and stress and the "biobehavioral model of migraine" (Welch, 1986). [less ▲]

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