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See detailCO2-blown microcellular non-isocyanate polyurethane (NIPU) foams: from bio- and CO2-sourced monomers to potentially thermal insulating materials
Grignard, Bruno ULg; Thomassin, Jean-Michel ULg; Gennen, Sandro ULg et al

in Green Chemistry (2016), 18(7), 2206-2215

Bio- and CO2-sourced non-isocyanate polyurethane (NIPU) microcellular foams were prepared using supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO2) foaming technology. These low-density foams offer low thermal ... [more ▼]

Bio- and CO2-sourced non-isocyanate polyurethane (NIPU) microcellular foams were prepared using supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO2) foaming technology. These low-density foams offer low thermal conductivity and have an impressive potential for use in insulating materials. They constitute attractive alternatives to conventional polyurethane foams. We investigated CO2’s ability to synthesize the cyclic carbonates that are used in the preparation of NIPU by melt step-growth polymerization with a bio-sourced amino-telechelic oligoamide and for NIPU foaming. Our study shows that CO2 is not only sequestered in the material for long-term application, but is also valorized as a blowing agent in the production of NIPU foams. Such foams will contribute to energy conservation and savings by reducing CO2 emissions. [less ▲]

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See detailPre-treatment and extraction techniques for recovery of added value compounds from wastes throughout the agri-food chain
Arshadi, Mehrdad; Attard, Thomas M.; Bogel-Lukasik, Rafal Marcin et al

in Green Chemistry (2016), (18), 6160-6204

The enormous quantity of food wastes discarded annually force to look for alternatives for this interesting feedstock. Thus, food bio-waste valorisation is one of the imperatives of the nowadays society ... [more ▼]

The enormous quantity of food wastes discarded annually force to look for alternatives for this interesting feedstock. Thus, food bio-waste valorisation is one of the imperatives of the nowadays society. This review is the most comprehensive overview of currently existing technologies and processes in this field. It tackles classical and innovative physical, physico-chemical and chemical methods of food waste pre-treatment and extraction for recovery of added value compounds and detection by modern technologies and are an outcome of the COST Action EUBIS, TD1203 Food Waste Valorisation for Sustainable Chemicals, Materials and Fuels. [less ▲]

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See detailSulfonated silica/carbon nanocomposites as novel catalysts for hydrolysis of cellulose to glucose
van de Vijver, Stijn; Peng, Li; Geboers, Jan et al

in Green Chemistry (2010), 12

Sulfonated silica/carbon nanocomposites were successfully developed as reusable, solid acid catalysts for the hydrolytic degradation of cellulose into high yields of glucose.

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See detailFirst example of “click” copper(I) catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition in supercritical carbon dioxide: Application to the functionalization of aliphatic polyesters
Grignard, Bruno ULg; Schmeits, Stephanie ULg; Riva, Raphaël ULg et al

in Green Chemistry (2009), 11

The modification of aliphatic polyesters by the copper(I) catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC) was successfully implemented in supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO2). Due to the remarkable ... [more ▼]

The modification of aliphatic polyesters by the copper(I) catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC) was successfully implemented in supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO2). Due to the remarkable properties of scCO2, the CuAAC reaction turned out to be quantitative even though the aliphatic polyesters used in this work were insoluble in scCO2. Interestingly enough, the conditions were mild enough to prevent polymer degradation from occurring and finally, efficient removal of the catalyst (>96%) was achieved by scCO2 extraction. [less ▲]

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