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See detailLes orthophonistes utilisent-ils les données issues de la recherche scientifique ? Analyse des pratiques afin d’ajuster la formation universitaire en Belgique
Durieux, Nancy ULg; Pasleau, Françoise ULg; Vandenput, Sandrina ULg et al

in Glossa (2013, December), 113

Une des missions fondamentales d’une formation universitaire est de permettre aux futurs professionnels d’identifier et de traiter efficacement les informations nécessaires aux prises de décisions parmi ... [more ▼]

Une des missions fondamentales d’une formation universitaire est de permettre aux futurs professionnels d’identifier et de traiter efficacement les informations nécessaires aux prises de décisions parmi un nombre toujours croissant de documents disponibles. Pour atteindre cet objectif, le recours à l’Evidence-Based Practice (EBP) s’avère une approche méthodologique permettant d’acquérir les savoirs et savoir-faire requis pour, notamment, la recherche d’informations probantes. L’EBP doit donc logiquement faire partie de la formation initiale des futurs orthophonistes en restant en adéquation avec les besoins et pratiques des professionnels. À cette fin, il est important d’identifier les questions que se posent les cliniciens dans leur pratique quotidienne, la manière dont ils trouvent des réponses et s’ils ont recours ou non aux données issues de la recherche scientifique. Une enquête a été lancée en mai 2012 auprès d’orthophonistes travaillant en Communauté française de Belgique. La présente communication exposera les principaux résultats, recueillis auprès de 410 orthophonistes, qui conduiront à des pistes d’action pour l’enseignement universitaire et la formation continue. [less ▲]

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See detailLe langage spontané des enfants prématurissimes : analyse du langage descriptif et informatif
Grooteclaes, Vanessa; Docquier, Laurence ULg; Maillart, Christelle ULg

in Glossa (2010), 108

The limits of prematurity don’t stop moving back and very premature children with a very low birth weight survive. Since a short time studies have been conducted on the cognitive and language evolution of ... [more ▼]

The limits of prematurity don’t stop moving back and very premature children with a very low birth weight survive. Since a short time studies have been conducted on the cognitive and language evolution of those children. This present study aims to determine the nature of language repercussions of extremely prematurity birth by focusing more particularly on spontaneous language. Language performances of 23 children born at less than 26 weeks of gestational age will be compared to the ones of 23 children born at term, paired by age (between 6 and 8 years old), sex and sociocultural level. Two tasks will be compared : a task of descriptive language (narration based on pictures) and a test of informative language in which the child will have to transmit some precise information on the realization of familiar actions. The children’s productions have been written down, then analysed from a lexical, syntactic and semantic point of view. Results show that the two groups of children do not differ in the task of descriptive language but differences emerge in the task of informative language. On lexical level the richness and variety of words used by premature children seem poorer than the ones used by children born at term. From the syntactic point of view the average length of utterances of premature children is inferior to the one of children born at term. At last the semantic analyses show that the premature children express less ideas and that the semantic content of the given ideas is less rich in comparison with the children born at term. In conclusion this study suggests that the discursive level of highly premature children mustn’t only be tested with descriptive tasks but also with informative tasks which seem more sensible to the specific weaknesses of that population. [less ▲]

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See detailLes déficits phonologiques des enfants francophones ayant des troubles spécifiques de développement du langage
Parisse, Christophe; Maillart, Christelle ULg

in Glossa (2004), 89

This study investigated the phonological expressive disorders of Frenchspeaking children with SLI. The main goal of this paper was to confirm whether children with SLI have limitations in phonological ... [more ▼]

This study investigated the phonological expressive disorders of Frenchspeaking children with SLI. The main goal of this paper was to confirm whether children with SLI have limitations in phonological ability even when they are compared with normally-developing children matched by MLU and phonemic inventory size. This was demonstrated by Bortoloni and Leonard (2000), Orsolini et coll. (2001), and Aguilar-Mediavilla et coll. (2002), which obtained the most detailed results in this direction, but it was never tested in French language. The second goal of the paper is to find out whether the characteristics of the French language are reflected in the nature of the children’s phonological disorder. In order to test this, the spontaneous language of 16 children with SLI and of 16 control children matched on MLU and phonemic inventory size (NLD group) was analysed using different measures bearing on utterances, words, syllables, or phonemes. In both SLI and NLD groups, the children were distributed in two different subgroups, on the basis of their MLU and phonemic inventory size. The results supported a specific limitation in the phonological abilities of French children with SLI, as was already demonstrated for English, Hebrew, Italian, and Spanish-Catalan. However, two unexpected results were also obtained. Firstly, a significant difference between children with SLI and control children could only be found for older children (MLU above 3), not for younger children with MLU below 3. This was true for all measures. This finding stresses out the importance of having a development perspective and has to be confirmed with longitudinal design. Secondly, deficits were much more important at the phoneme level than at the syllable level. This can be explained by the fact that the French language has a very homogenous pronunciation of syllables, which makes them easier to segment. [less ▲]

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See detailLe coût cognitif des processus orthographiques
Schelstraete, Marie-Anne; Maillart, Christelle ULg

in Glossa (2004), 89

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