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See detailModelling the Holocene migrational dynamics of Fagus sylvatica L. and Picea abies (L.) H. Karst
Lehsten, Lehsten; Dullinger, Stefan; Hülber, Karl et al

in Global Ecology and Biogeography (2014)

Aim: Vegetation dynamics and the competitive interactions involved are assumed to restrict the ability of species to migrate. But in most migration modelling approaches disturbance-driven succession and ... [more ▼]

Aim: Vegetation dynamics and the competitive interactions involved are assumed to restrict the ability of species to migrate. But in most migration modelling approaches disturbance-driven succession and competition processes are reduced to simple assumptions or are even missing. The aim of this study was to test a combination of a migration model and a dynamic vegetation model to estimate the migration of tree species controlled by climate, environment and local species dynamics such as succession and competition. Location: Europe. Methods: To estimate the effect of vegetation dynamics on the migration of European beech and Norway spruce, we developed a post-process migration tool (LPJ-CATS). This tool integrates outputs of the migration model CATS and the dynamic vegetation model LPJ-GUESS. The model LPJ-CATS relies on a linear dependency between the dispersal kernel and migration rate and is based on the assumption that competition reduces fecundity. Results: Simulating potential migration rates with the CATS model, which does not account for competition and disturbance, resulted in mean Holocene migra- tion rates of 435 ± 55 and 330 ± 95 m year−1 for the two species Picea abies and Fagus sylvatica, respectively. With LPJ-CATS, these mean migration rates were reduced to 250 ± 75 and 170 ± 60 m year−1 for spruce and beech, respectively. Moreover, LPJ-CATS simulated migration pathways of these two species that gen- erally comply well with those documented in the palaeo-records. Main conclusions: Our ‘hybrid’ modelling approach allowed for the simulation of generally realistic Holocene migration rates and pathways of the two study species on a continental scale. It suggests that competition can considerably modify spread rates, but also the magnitude of its effect depends on how close climate conditions are to the niche requirements of a particular species. [less ▲]

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See detailImprints of glacial refugia in the modern genetic diversity of Pinus sylvestris
Cheddadi, R.; Vendramin, G. G.; Litt, T. et al

in Global Ecology And Biogeography (2006), 15(3), 271-282

Aim To understand the impact of glacial refugia and migration pathways on the modern genetic diversity of Pinus sylvestris. Location The study was carried out throughout Europe. Methods An extended set of ... [more ▼]

Aim To understand the impact of glacial refugia and migration pathways on the modern genetic diversity of Pinus sylvestris. Location The study was carried out throughout Europe. Methods An extended set of data of pollen and macrofossil remains was used to locate the glacial refugia and reconstruct the migrating routes of P. sylvestris throughout Europe. A vegetation model was used to simulate the extent of the potential refugia during the last glacial period. At the same time a genetic survey was carried out on this species. Results The simulated distribution of P. sylvestris during the last glacial period is coherent with the observed fossil data, which showed a patchy distribution of the refugia between c. 40 degrees N and 50 degrees N. Several migrational fronts were detected within the Iberian and the Italian peninsulas, and outside the Hungarian plain and around the Alps. The modern mitochondrial DNA depicted three different haplotypes for P. sylvestris. Two distinct haplotypes were restricted to northern Spain and Italy, and the third haplotype dominated most of the present-day remaining distribution range of P. sylvestris in Europe. Main concluions During the last glacial period P. sylvestris was constrained under severe climatic conditions to survive in scattered and restricted refugial areas. Combining palaeoenvironmental data, vegetation modelling and the genetic data, we have shown that the long-term isolation in the glacial refugia and the migrational process during the Holocene have played a major role in shaping the modern genetic diversity of P. sylvestris in Europe. [less ▲]

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