References of "Global Ecology & Biogeography"
     in
Bookmark and Share    
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailDifferences in species–area relationships among the major lineages of land plants: a macroecological perspective
Patino Llorente, Jairo ULg; Weigelt, P.; Guilhaumon, F. et al

in Global Ecology & Biogeography (in press)

Detailed reference viewed: 42 (12 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailLarge trees drive forest aboveground biomass variation in moist lowland forests accross the tropics
Slik, J. W. Ferry; Paoli, Gary; McGuire, Krista et al

in Global Ecology & Biogeography (2013), 22

Aim Large trees (d.b.h. 70 cm) store large amounts of biomass. Several studies suggest that large trees may be vulnerable to changing climate, potentially leading to declining forest biomass storage. Here ... [more ▼]

Aim Large trees (d.b.h. 70 cm) store large amounts of biomass. Several studies suggest that large trees may be vulnerable to changing climate, potentially leading to declining forest biomass storage. Here we determine the importance of large trees for tropical forest biomass storage and explore which intrinsic (species trait) and extrinsic (environment) variables are associated with the density of large trees and forest biomass at continental and pan-tropical scales. Location Pan-tropical. Methods Aboveground biomass (AGB) was calculated for 120 intact lowland moist forest locations. Linear regression was used to calculate variation in AGB explained by the density of large trees. Akaike information criterion weights (AICcwi) were used to calculate averaged correlation coefficients for all possible multiple regression models between AGB/density of large trees and environmental and species trait variables correcting for spatial autocorrelation. Results Density of large trees explained c. 70% of the variation in pan-tropical AGB and was also responsible for significantly lower AGB in Neotropical [287.8 (mean) 105.0 (SD) Mg ha-1] versus Palaeotropical forests (Africa 418.3 91.8 Mg ha-1; Asia 393.3 109.3 Mg ha-1). Pan-tropical variation in density of large trees and AGB was associated with soil coarseness (negative), soil fertility (positive), community wood density (positive) and dominance of wind dispersed species (positive), temperature in the coldest month (negative), temperature in the warmest month (negative) and rainfall in the wettest month (positive), but results were not always consistent among continents. Main conclusions Density of large trees and AGB were significantly associated with climatic variables, indicating that climate change will affect tropical forest biomass storage. Species trait composition will interact with these future biomass changes as they are also affected by a warmer climate. Given the importance of large trees for variation in AGB across the tropics, and their sensitivity to climate change, we emphasize the need for in-depth analyses of the community dynamics of large trees. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 29 (12 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailBio-ORACLE: a global environmental dataset for marine species distribution modelling
Tyberghein, Lennert; Verbruggen, Heroen; Klaas, Pauly et al

in Global Ecology & Biogeography (2012), 21(2), 272-281

Detailed reference viewed: 37 (3 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailEcogeographical variation of body size in the newt Triturus carnifex: comparing the hypotheses using an information-theoretic approach
Ficetola, Gentile Francesco; Scali, Stefano; Denoël, Mathieu ULg et al

in Global Ecology & Biogeography (2010), 19(4), 485-495

Aim. Ecogeographical body size variation in vertebrates (e.g., Bergmann’s rule) has long been recognized. However, the patterns and causes of intraspecific ecogeographical body size variation in ... [more ▼]

Aim. Ecogeographical body size variation in vertebrates (e.g., Bergmann’s rule) has long been recognized. However, the patterns and causes of intraspecific ecogeographical body size variation in ectotherms, and in amphibians in particular, are strongly debated. We identified the relationship between bioclimatic variables and body size predicted a priori by alternative hypotheses (heat balance; endurance, seasonality, starvation resistance, water availability; primary productivity, parental investment) proposed to explain ecogeographical patterns of body size in ectotherms, and we evaluated the relative support of these hypotheses in explaining body size variation of the Italian crested newt, Triturus carnifex. Location Twenty-three populations covering the whole range of T. carnifex (Austria, Croatia, Italy and Slovenia) Methods. We obtained data on body size (SVL) of 2639 adult newts from direct measurements and the literature; we obtained high resolution environmental data for the sampled localities. We used an information-theoretic approach to evaluate the support of the different hypotheses, by the data. We also integrated information on population genetics in our models. Results. We observed strong geographic variation of body size. The best AIC models showed that populations with larger body size are associated with cold climates and secondarily with high primary productivity. Furthermore, sexual dimorphism increases in cold climates, as the increase in body size was stronger for females. When taking into account population genetics, we did not find support for relationships with the other variables. Main conclusion. Our results are consistent with three hypotheses proposed to explain ecogeographic variation in amphibians: heat balance, increased parental investment of females and productivity. Information theory provides the framework for comparing hypotheses rather than looking for patterns. We suggest that evaluating the support of mechanisms can provide better insights than simply assessing whether ecogeographical variation is in agreement with some ‘rule’. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 129 (14 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailThe global biogeography of semi-arid periodic vegetation patterns.
Deblauwe, V; Barbier, N; Couteron, P et al

in Global Ecology & Biogeography (2008), 17(6), 715-723

Detailed reference viewed: 13 (0 ULg)