References of "Geophysical Research Letters"
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See detailVolcanic eruptions boost tropical Pacific biological productivity
Chikamoto, Megumi O.; Timmermann, Axel; Yoshimori, Masakazu et al

in Geophysical Research Letters (2016), 43

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See detailMAVEN IUVS observations of the aftermath of the Comet Siding Spring meteor shower on Mars
Schneider, Nick; Deighan, Justin; Stewart, Ian et al

in Geophysical Research Letters (2015)

We report the detection of intense emission from magnesium and iron in Mars' atmosphere caused by a meteor shower following Comet Siding Spring's close encounter with Mars. The observations were made with ... [more ▼]

We report the detection of intense emission from magnesium and iron in Mars' atmosphere caused by a meteor shower following Comet Siding Spring's close encounter with Mars. The observations were made with the Imaging Ultraviolet Spectrograph, a remote sensing instrument on the Mars Atmosphere and Volatile EvolutioN spacecraft orbiting Mars. Ionized magnesium caused the brightest emission from the planet's atmosphere for many hours, resulting from resonant scattering of solar ultraviolet light. Modeling suggests a substantial fluence of low-density dust particles 1–100 µm in size, with the large amount and small size contrary to predictions. The event created a temporary planet-wide ionospheric layer below Mars' main dayside ionosphere. The dramatic meteor shower response at Mars is starkly different from the case at Earth, where a steady state metal layer is always observable but perturbations caused by even the strongest meteor showers are challenging to detect. [less ▲]

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See detailTerrestrial OH nightglow measurements during the Rosetta flyby
Migliorini, A.; Gérard, Jean-Claude ULg; Soret, Lauriane ULg et al

in Geophysical Research Letters (2015), 42

We present a study of the terrestrial hydroxyl nightglow emissions observed with the Visible and Infrared Thermal Imaging Spectrometer on board the Rosetta mission. During these observations, the OH Δv  ... [more ▼]

We present a study of the terrestrial hydroxyl nightglow emissions observed with the Visible and Infrared Thermal Imaging Spectrometer on board the Rosetta mission. During these observations, the OH Δv = 1 and 2 sequences were measured simultaneously. This allowed investigating the relative population of the v = 1 to 9 vibrational levels by using both sequences. In particular, the relative population of the vibrational level v = 1 is determined for the first time from observations. The vibrational population decreases with increasing vibrational quantum number. A good agreement is found with a recent model calculation assuming multiquantum relaxation for OH(v) quenching by O2 and single-quantum relaxation for OH(v) by N2. [less ▲]

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See detailTransient internally driven aurora at Jupiter discovered by Hisaki and the Hubble Space Telescope
Kimura, Tomoki; Badman, Sarah; Tao, Chihiro et al

in Geophysical Research Letters (2015), 42

Jupiter’s auroral emissions reveal energy transport and dissipation through the planet’s giant magnetosphere. While the main auroral emission is internally driven by planetary rotation in the steady state ... [more ▼]

Jupiter’s auroral emissions reveal energy transport and dissipation through the planet’s giant magnetosphere. While the main auroral emission is internally driven by planetary rotation in the steady state, transient brightenings are generally thought to be triggered by compression by the external solar wind. Here we present evidence provided by the new Hisaki spacecraft and the Hubble Space Telescope that shows that such brightening of Jupiter’s aurora can in fact be internally driven. The brightening has an excess power up to ~550 GW. Intense emission appears from the polar cap region down to latitudes around Io’s footprint aurora, suggesting a rapid energy input into the polar region by the internal plasma circulation process. [less ▲]

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See detailTen years of Martian nitric oxide nightglow observations
Stiepen, Arnaud ULg; Gérard, Jean-Claude ULg; Gagné, Marie-Eve et al

in Geophysical Research Letters (2015)

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See detailNew observations of molecular nitrogen in the Martian upper atmosphere by IUVS on MAVEN
Stevens, M. H.; Evans, J. S.; Schneider, N. M. et al

in Geophysical Research Letters (2015)

We identify molecular nitrogen (N2) emissions in the Martian upper atmosphere using the Imaging Ultraviolet Spectrograph (IUVS) on NASA's Mars Atmosphere and Volatile EvolutioN (MAVEN) mission. We report ... [more ▼]

We identify molecular nitrogen (N2) emissions in the Martian upper atmosphere using the Imaging Ultraviolet Spectrograph (IUVS) on NASA's Mars Atmosphere and Volatile EvolutioN (MAVEN) mission. We report the first observations of the N2 Lyman-Birge-Hopfield (LBH) bands at Mars and confirm the tentative identification of the N2 Vegard-Kaplan (VK) bands. We retrieve N2 density profiles from the VK limb emissions and compare calculated limb radiances between 90 and 210km against both observations and predictions from a Mars general circulation model (GCM). Contrary to earlier analyses using other satellite data, we find that N2 abundances exceed GCM results by about a factor of 2 at 130km but are in agreement at 150km. The analysis and interpretation are enabled by a linear regression method used to extract components of UV spectra from IUVS limb observations. © 2015. American Geophysical Union. All Rights Reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailMAVEN IUVS observation of the hot oxygen corona at Mars
Deighan, J.; Chaffin, M. S.; Chaufray, J.-Y. et al

in Geophysical Research Letters (2015)

Observation of the hot oxygen corona at Mars has been an elusive measurement in planetary science. Characterizing this component of the planet's exosphere provides insight into the processes driving loss ... [more ▼]

Observation of the hot oxygen corona at Mars has been an elusive measurement in planetary science. Characterizing this component of the planet's exosphere provides insight into the processes driving loss of oxygen at the current time, which informs understanding of the planet's climatic evolution. The Mars Atmosphere and Volatile EvolutioN (MAVEN) Imaging Ultraviolet Spectrograph (IUVS) instrument is now regularly collecting altitude profiles of the hot oxygen corona as part of its investigation of atmospheric escape from Mars. Observations obtained thus far have been examined and found to display the expected gross structure and variability with EUV forcing anticipated by theory. The quality and quantity of the data set provides valuable constraints for the coronal modeling community. © 2015. American Geophysical Union. All Rights Reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailProbing the Martian atmosphere with MAVEN/IUVS stellar occultations
Gröller, H.; Yelle, R. V.; Koskinen, T. T. et al

in Geophysical Research Letters (2015)

The first campaign of stellar occultations with the Imaging Ultraviolet Spectrograph (IUVS) instrument on board of Mars Atmosphere and Volatile EvolutioN (MAVEN) mission was executed between 24 and 26 ... [more ▼]

The first campaign of stellar occultations with the Imaging Ultraviolet Spectrograph (IUVS) instrument on board of Mars Atmosphere and Volatile EvolutioN (MAVEN) mission was executed between 24 and 26 March 2015. From this campaign 13 occultations are used to retrieve CO2 and O2 number densities in the altitude range between 100 and 150 km. Observations probe primarily the low-latitude regions on the nightside of the planet, just past the dawn and dusk terminator. Calculation of temperature from the CO2 density profiles reveals that the lower thermosphere is significantly cooler than predicted by the models in the Mars Climate Database. A systematically cold layer with temperatures of 105-120 K is seen in the occultations at a pressure level around 7 × 10-6 Pa. © 2015. American Geophysical Union. All Rights Reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailThree-dimensional structure in the Mars H corona revealed by IUVS on MAVEN
Chaffin, M. S.; Chaufray, J. Y.; Deighan, J. et al

in Geophysical Research Letters (2015)

Loss of water to space via neutral hydrogen escape has been an important process throughout Martian history. Contemporary loss rates can be constrained through observations of the extended neutral ... [more ▼]

Loss of water to space via neutral hydrogen escape has been an important process throughout Martian history. Contemporary loss rates can be constrained through observations of the extended neutral hydrogen atmosphere of Mars in scattered sunlight at 121.6 nm. Historically, such observations have been interpreted with coupled density and radiative transfer models, inferring escape fluxes from brightness profiles gathered by flybys, orbiters, and telescope observations. Here we demonstrate that the spherical symmetry assumed by prior analyses cannot reproduce observations by the Imaging Ultraviolet Spectrograph (IUVS) on the Mars Atmosphere and Volatile EvolutioN (MAVEN) mission. We present unique observations of the Mars H corona to large radial distances and mapping results from initial MAVEN science at Mars. These observations represent the first detection of three-dimensional structure in the H corona of Mars, with implications for understanding the atmosphere today and the loss of H to space throughout Martian history. © 2015. American Geophysical Union. All Rights Reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailRetrieval of CO2 and N2 in the Martian thermosphere using dayglow observations by IUVS on MAVEN
Evans, J. S.; Stevens, M. H.; Lumpe, J. D. et al

in Geophysical Research Letters (2015)

We present direct number density retrievals of carbon dioxide (CO2) and molecular nitrogen (N2) for the upper atmosphere of Mars using limb scan observations during October and November 2014 by the ... [more ▼]

We present direct number density retrievals of carbon dioxide (CO2) and molecular nitrogen (N2) for the upper atmosphere of Mars using limb scan observations during October and November 2014 by the Imaging Ultraviolet Spectrograph on board NASA's Mars Atmosphere and Volatile EvolutioN (MAVEN) spacecraft. We use retrieved CO2 densities to derive temperature variability between 170 and 220km. Analysis of the data shows (1) low-mid latitude northern hemisphere CO2 densities at 170km vary by a factor of about 2.5, (2) on average, the N2/CO2 increases from 0.042±0.017 at 130km to 0.12±0.06 at 200km, and (3) the mean upper atmospheric temperature is 324±22K for local times near 14:00. © 2015. American Geophysical Union. All Rights Reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailStudy of the Martian cold oxygen corona from the OI 130.4nm by IUVS/MAVEN
Chaufray, J. Y.; Deighan, J.; Chaffin, M. S. et al

in Geophysical Research Letters (2015)

First observations of the OI 130.4nm resonant line performed by the Imaging Ultraviolet Spectrograph (IUVS) aboard the Mars Atmosphere and Volatile EvolutioN mission (MAVEN) are presented in this paper ... [more ▼]

First observations of the OI 130.4nm resonant line performed by the Imaging Ultraviolet Spectrograph (IUVS) aboard the Mars Atmosphere and Volatile EvolutioN mission (MAVEN) are presented in this paper. This emission line is observed during the different orbit phases of MAVEN. The atomic oxygen density and the temperature at 200km are retrieved from an automatic pipeline using a radiative transfer model for resonant scattering lines for a selection of coronal profiles. These selected profiles are representative of the coronal scans done during the first months of the mission (from November 2014 to January 2015). The derived oxygen density and the temperature near the exobase are in the predicted range by the current thermospheric models of Mars for moderate solar activity, and some diurnal variations are observed. However, the absolute calibration of the instrument significantly limits the accuracy of density and temperature results. © 2015. American Geophysical Union. All Rights Reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailThe structure and variability of Mars upper atmosphere as seen in MAVEN/IUVS dayglow observations
Jain, S. K.; Stewart, A. I. F.; Schneider, N. M. et al

in Geophysical Research Letters (2015)

We report a comprehensive study of Mars dayglow observations focusing on upper atmospheric structure and seasonal variability. We analyzed 744 vertical brightness profiles comprised of ∼109,300 spectra ... [more ▼]

We report a comprehensive study of Mars dayglow observations focusing on upper atmospheric structure and seasonal variability. We analyzed 744 vertical brightness profiles comprised of ∼109,300 spectra obtained with the Imaging Ultraviolet Spectrograph (IUVS) aboard the Mars Atmosphere and Volatile EvolutioN (MAVEN) satellite. The dayglow emission spectra show features similar to previous UV measurements at Mars. We find a significant drop in thermospheric scale height and temperature between LS = 218° and LS = 337-352°, attributed primarily to the decrease in solar activity and increase in heliocentric distance. We report the detection of a second, low-altitude peak in the emission profile of OI 297.2 nm, confirmation of the prediction that the absorption of solar Lyman alpha emission is an important energy source there. The CO2+ UV doublet peak intensity is well correlated with simultaneous observations of solar 17-22 nm irradiance at Mars. © 2015. American Geophysical Union. All Rights Reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailUltraviolet observations of the hydrogen coma of comet C/2013 A1 (Siding Spring) by MAVEN/IUVS
Crismani, M. M. J.; Schneider, N. M.; Deighan, J. I. et al

in Geophysical Research Letters (2015)

We used the Imaging Ultraviolet Spectrograph (IUVS) aboard the Mars Atmosphere and Volatile EvolutioN (MAVEN) orbiting spacecraft to construct images of the hydrogen coma of comet C/2013 A1 (Siding Spring ... [more ▼]

We used the Imaging Ultraviolet Spectrograph (IUVS) aboard the Mars Atmosphere and Volatile EvolutioN (MAVEN) orbiting spacecraft to construct images of the hydrogen coma of comet C/2013 A1 (Siding Spring) days before its close encounter with Mars. We obtain a water production rate of 1.1 ± 0.5 × 1028 molecules/s and determine the total impacting fluence of atoms and molecules corresponding to the photodissociation of water and its daughter species to be 2.4 ± 1.2 × 104 kg. We use these observations to confirm predictions that the mass of delivered hydrogen is comparable to the existing reservoir above 150 km. Furthermore, we reconcile disparity between observations and predictions about the detectability of the hydrogen perturbation and thermospheric response. © 2015. American Geophysical Union. All Rights Reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailNonmigrating tides in the Martian atmosphere as observed by MAVEN IUVS
Lo, D. Y.; Yelle, R. V.; Schneider, N. M. et al

in Geophysical Research Letters (2015)

Using the Mars Atmospheric and Volatile EvolutioN mission (MAVEN) Imaging Ultraviolet Spectrograph (IUVS), we found periodic longitudinal variations in CO2 density in the Martian atmosphere. These density ... [more ▼]

Using the Mars Atmospheric and Volatile EvolutioN mission (MAVEN) Imaging Ultraviolet Spectrograph (IUVS), we found periodic longitudinal variations in CO2 density in the Martian atmosphere. These density variations are derived from observations of the CO2+ (B2Σ+→X2Π) emission from limb scans in the 100-190 km altitude range. The variations exhibit significant structure with longitudinal wave numbers 1, 2, and 3 in an effectively constant local solar time frame, and we attribute this structure to nonmigrating tides. The wave-2 component is dominated by the diurnal eastward moving DE1 tide at the equator and the semidiurnal stationary S0 tide at the midlatitudes. Wave-3 is dominated by the diurnal eastward moving DE2 tide, with possibly the semidiurnal eastward moving SE1 tide causing an amplitude increase at the midlatitudes. Structure in the wave-1 component can be explained by the semidiurnal westward moving SW1 tide. ©2015. American Geophysical Union. [less ▲]

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See detailRapid dynamic activation of a marine-based Arctic ice cap
McMillan, M; Shepherd, A; Gourmelen, N et al

in Geophysical Research Letters (2014), 41(24), 89028909

We use satellite observations to document rapid acceleration and ice loss from a formerly slow-flowing, marine-based sector of Austfonna, the largest ice cap in the Eurasian Arctic. During the past two ... [more ▼]

We use satellite observations to document rapid acceleration and ice loss from a formerly slow-flowing, marine-based sector of Austfonna, the largest ice cap in the Eurasian Arctic. During the past two decades, the sector ice discharge has increased 45-fold, the velocity regime has switched from predominantly slow (~ 101 m/yr) to fast (~ 103 m/yr) flow, and rates of ice thinning have exceeded 25 m/yr. At the time of widespread dynamic activation, parts of the terminus may have been near floatation. Subsequently, the imbalance has propagated 50 km inland to within 8 km of the ice cap summit. Our observations demonstrate the ability of slow-flowing ice to mobilize and quickly transmit the dynamic imbalance inland; a process that we show has initiated rapid ice loss to the ocean and redistribution of ice mass to locations more susceptible to melt, yet which remains poorly understood. [less ▲]

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See detailSaturn’s elusive nightside polar arc
Radioti, Aikaterini ULg; Grodent, Denis ULg; Gérard, Jean-Claude ULg et al

in Geophysical Research Letters (2014)

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See detailDynamic auroral storms on Saturn as observed by the Hubble Space Telescope
Nichols, J. D.; Badman, S. V.; Baines, K. H. et al

in Geophysical Research Letters (2014), 41

We present observations of significant dynamics within two UV auroral storms observed on Saturn using the Hubble Space Telescope in April/May 2013. Specifically, we discuss bursts of auroral emission ... [more ▼]

We present observations of significant dynamics within two UV auroral storms observed on Saturn using the Hubble Space Telescope in April/May 2013. Specifically, we discuss bursts of auroral emission observed at the poleward boundary of a solar wind-induced auroral storm, propagating at ˜330% rigid corotation from near ˜01 h LT toward ˜08 h LT. We suggest that these are indicative of ongoing, bursty reconnection of lobe flux in the magnetotail, providing strong evidence that Saturn's auroral storms are caused by large-scale flux closure. We also discuss the later evolution of a similar storm and show that the emission maps to the trailing region of an energetic neutral atom enhancement. We thus identify the auroral form with the upward field-aligned continuity currents flowing into the associated partial ring current. [less ▲]

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See detailA 3400 year lacustrine paleoseismic record from the North Anatolian Fault, Turkey: Implications for bimodal recurrence behavior
Avsar, Ulas; Hubert, Aurelia ULg; De Batist, Marc et al

in Geophysical Research Letters (2014), 41(2), 377-384

High-resolution physical, geochemical, and geochronological analyses on the sedimentary sequence of Yeniçağa Lake, located in a fault-bounded basin along the North Anatolian Fault, reveal fingerprints of ... [more ▼]

High-resolution physical, geochemical, and geochronological analyses on the sedimentary sequence of Yeniçağa Lake, located in a fault-bounded basin along the North Anatolian Fault, reveal fingerprints of paleoearthquakes. A robust sediment chronology, spanning the last 3400 years, is constructed by radiocarbon dating and time-stratigraphical correlation with the precisely dated Sofular Cave speleothem record. Yeniçağa sedimentary sequence contains 11 seismically induced event deposits characterized by siliciclastic-enriched intervals. Some of the event deposits are also associated with implications of sudden lake deepening, which may be related to coseismic subsidence. The paleoearthquake series having an average recurrence interval of ca. 260 years are interrupted by two possible seismic gaps of ca. 420 and 540 years. [less ▲]

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See detailCusp observation at Saturn’s high-latitude magnetosphere by the Cassini spacecraft
Jasinski; Arridge; Lamy et al

in Geophysical Research Letters (2014)

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See detailImportance of temporal variability for hydrological predictions based on the maximum entropy production principle
Westhoff, Martijn ULg; Zehe, Erwin; Schymanski, Stanislaus J.

in Geophysical Research Letters (2014)

This work builds on earlier work by Kleidon and Schymanski (2008) who explored the use of the maximum entropy production (MEP) principle for modeling hydrological systems. They illustrated that MEP can be ... [more ▼]

This work builds on earlier work by Kleidon and Schymanski (2008) who explored the use of the maximum entropy production (MEP) principle for modeling hydrological systems. They illustrated that MEP can be used to determine the partitioning of soil water into runoff and evaporation—which determines hydroclimatic conditions around the Globe—by optimizing effective soil and canopy conductances in a way to maximize entropy production by these fluxes. In the present study, we show analytically that under their assumption of constant rainfall, the proposed principle always yields an optimum where the two conductances are equal, irrespective of rainfall rate, evaporative demand, or gravitational potential. Subsequently, we show that under periodic forcing or periodic variations in one resistance (e.g., vegetation seasonality), the optimal conductance does depend on climatic drivers such as the length of dry spells or the time of closure of stomata. [less ▲]

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