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See detailEarthquake imprints on a lacustrine deltaic system: Example of the Kürk Delta along the East Anatolian Fault (Turkey)
Hubert, Aurelia ULiege; El Ouahabi, Meriam ULiege; Moreno, David et al

in Geophysical Research Abstracts (2017), 19

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See detailEffects of the soil pore network architecture on the soil’s physical functionnalities
Smet, Sarah ULiege; Beckers, Eléonore ULiege; Léonard, Angélique ULiege et al

in Geophysical Research Abstracts (2017), 19

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See detailUsing NDACC column measurements of carbonyl sulfide to estimate its sources and sinks
Wang; Marshall, J; Palm, M et al

in Geophysical Research Abstracts (2016, April 19), 18

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See detailAbel inversion method for cometary atmospheres.
Hubert, Benoît ULiege; Opitom, Cyrielle ULiege; Hutsemekers, Damien ULiege et al

in Geophysical Research Abstracts (2016, April 01), 18

Remote observation of cometary atmospheres produces a measurement of the cometary emissions integrated along the line of sight joining the observing instrument and the gas of the coma. This integration is ... [more ▼]

Remote observation of cometary atmospheres produces a measurement of the cometary emissions integrated along the line of sight joining the observing instrument and the gas of the coma. This integration is the so-called Abel transform of the local emission rate. We develop a method specifically adapted to the inversion of the Abel transform of cometary emissions, that retrieves the radial profile of the emission rate of any unabsorbed emission, under the hypothesis of spherical symmetry of the coma. The method uses weighted least squares fitting and analytical results. A Tikhonov regularization technique is applied to reduce the possible effects of noise and ill-conditioning, and standard error propagation techniques are implemented. Several theoretical tests of the inversion techniques are carried out to show its validity and robustness, and show that the method is only weakly dependent on any constant offset added to the data, which reduces the dependence of the retrieved emission rate on the background subtraction. We apply the method to observations of three different comets observed using the TRAPPIST instrument: 103P/ Hartley 2, F6/ Lemmon and A1/ Siding spring. We show that the method retrieves realistic emission rates, and that characteristic lengths and production rates can be derived from the emission rate for both CN and C2 molecules. We show that the emission rate derived from the observed flux of CN emission at 387 nm and from the C2 emission at 514.1 nm of comet Siding Spring both present an easily-identifiable shoulder that corresponds to the separation between pre- and post-outburst gas. As a general result, we show that diagnosing properties and features of the coma using the emission rate is easier than directly using the observed flux. We also determine the parameters of a Haser model fitting the inverted data and fitting the line-of-sight integrated observation, for which we provide the exact analytical expression of the line-of-sight integration of the Haser model. [less ▲]

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See detailLast millennium gravity reworking processes in the western Gulf of Corinth: correlations with historical seismicity and indication of earthquake clusters
Beckers, Arnaud; Beck, Christian; Hubert, Aurelia ULiege et al

in Geophysical Research Abstracts (2016), 18

The western tip of the Corinth Rift is considered as the most active within this major extensional structure, as evidenced by: seismicity, GPS kinematics, and INSAR data (Bernard et al., 2006). Within the ... [more ▼]

The western tip of the Corinth Rift is considered as the most active within this major extensional structure, as evidenced by: seismicity, GPS kinematics, and INSAR data (Bernard et al., 2006). Within the frame of a multidisciplinary project dedicated to seismic hazards assessment for this region, two offshore surveys - high resolution seismic reflection and gravity coring - were conducted in this area. They were dedicated to the Late Quaternary sedimentary fill as the latter was expected to record both long term deformation (Beckers et al., 2015) and sedimentary “events” related to major earthquakes and/or tsunamis. Seismic reflection imaging displays the time and geographical distributions of large submarine landslides (MTDs) during the last 100 kyr. Based on a morpho-sedimentary map and the active fault pattern, up to 2 m-long cores were selected to detect and characterise the possible impact of historical events. The chronological control is based on AMS 14C dating and four detailed 210Pb and 137Cs profiles. Sedimentation (components, sources, transport and settling mechanisms) was analysed through textural, chemical, and mineralogical parameters. Turbidites could be clearly separated from the hemipelagic deposits. Our attempt to correlate identified sedimentary “events” with historical data greatly benefited from a recently elaborated catalog (Albini et al., 2014) with precisely re-located epicentral areas. Cable breaks were also taken into account. Attenuation models (Papazachos & Papaioannou’s, 1997) were used to discuss paleo-intensities vs. distance form epicentral areas. From the whole set of cores, the following results may be underlined: - the correlations between cores from the different sites are not complete, including for a few neighbouring sites belonging to the same morpho-sedimentary unit; we relate these discrepancies to the complex bottom morphology and/or to bottom currents responsible for local erosion; - for several well-documented earthquakes and tsunamis, we could not find a clearly recorded sedimentary impact; - non earthquake-triggered MTDs (as the 1963 event) produced specific layers identical to the major earthquakes impacts. At the difference, for a few cores from the deep axial floor, several sandy or silty turbidites permit to establish correlations: i) between coring sites, ii) with earthquakes which stroke two different areas, respectively east and west of the concerned part of the Gulf. Furthermore, the sedimentary events show a particular time distribution for the last 600 yr: - two intervals with short recurrences: a recent one ( 1900 AD-Present or 1750 AD-Present) and an older one ( 1550 AD-1700 AD or 1450 AD-1800 AD); these time distributions differ from each coring site; - a long “quiet” period (150 to 200 yr). From these results, we tentatively consider this sedimentary record as an indicator of a migration of seismogenic faulting activity. Ref.: Albini, P., et al., 2014. Techn. Rep. I.N.G.V. Roma. Beckers, A., et al., 2015. Marine Geology, 360:55–69 Bernard, P., et al., 2006. Tectonophysics, 426:7-30. Papazachos, C., Papaioannou, C., 1997. Journal of Seismology, 1:181-201. [less ▲]

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See detailGeological evidence for Holocene earthquakes and tsunamis along the Nankai-Suruga Trough, Japan
Garett, Ed; Fujiwara, Osamu; Garrett, Philip et al

in Geophysical Research Abstracts (2016)

The Nankai-Suruga Trough, lying immediately south of Japan’s densely populated and highly industrialised southern coastline, generates devastating great earthquakes (magnitude > 8). Intense shaking ... [more ▼]

The Nankai-Suruga Trough, lying immediately south of Japan’s densely populated and highly industrialised southern coastline, generates devastating great earthquakes (magnitude > 8). Intense shaking, crustal deformation and tsunami generation accompany these ruptures. Forecasting the hazards associated with future earthquakes along this >700 km long fault requires a comprehensive understanding of past fault behaviour. While the region benefits from a long and detailed historical record, palaeoseismology has the potential to provide a longer-term perspective and additional insights. Here, we summarise the current state of knowledge regarding geological evidence for past earthquakes and tsunamis, incorporating literature originally published in both Japanese and English. This evidence comes from a wide variety of sources, including uplifted marine terraces and biota, marine and lacustrine turbidites, liquefaction features, subsided marshes and tsunami deposits in coastal lakes and lowlands. We enhance available results with new age modelling approaches. While publications describe proposed evidence from > 70 sites, only a limited number provide compelling, well-dated evidence. The best available records allow us to map the most likely rupture zones of eleven earthquakes occurring during the historical period. Our spatiotemporal compilation suggests the AD 1707 earthquake ruptured almost the full length of the subduction zone and that earthquakes in AD 1361 and 684 were predecessors of similar magnitude. Intervening earthquakes were of lesser magnitude, highlighting variability in rupture mode. Recurrence intervals for ruptures of the a single seismic segment range from less than 100 to more than 450 years during the historical period. Over longer timescales, palaeoseismic evidence suggests intervals ranging from 100 to 700 years. However, these figures reflect thresholds of evidence creation and preservation as well as genuine recurrence intervals. At present, we have not identified any geological data that support the occurrence earthquakes of larger magnitude than that experienced in AD 1707; however, few published studies seek to establish the relative magnitudes of different earthquake and tsunami events. Alongside the paucity of research designed to quantify the magnitude of past earthquakes, we emphasise a number of other issues, including alternative hypotheses for proposed palaeoseismic evidence, the lack of robust chronological frameworks and insufficient appreciation of changing thresholds of evidence creation and preservation over time. These key issues must be addressed by future research. [less ▲]

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See detailCharacteristics and frequency of large submarine landslides at the western tip of the Gulf of Corinth
Beckers, Arnaud; Hubert, Aurelia ULiege; Beck, Christian et al

in Geophysical Research Abstracts (2016), 18

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See detailA first database for landslide studies in densely urbanized areas of the intertropical zone: Abidjan, Côte d’Ivoire
Gnagne, Lorng Frédéric ULiege; Demoulin, Alain ULiege; Biemi, Jean et al

in Geophysical Research Abstracts (2016), 18

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See detailGeomorphometric mapping of spatio-temporal changes in Plio-Quaternary uplift in the NW European Alpine foreland
Demoulin, Alain ULiege; Bourdon, Hadrien

in Geophysical Research Abstracts (2016), 18

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See detailHalogenated source gases measured by FTIR at the Jungfraujoch station: updated trends and new target species
Mahieu, Emmanuel ULiege; Bader, Whitney ULiege; Bovy, Benoît ULiege et al

in Geophysical Research Abstracts (2015, April 13), 17

In this contribution, we present decadal time series of halogenated source gases monitored at the high altitude station of the Jungfraujoch (46.5°N, 8°E, 3580 m asl) with Fourier Transform Infared (FTIR ... [more ▼]

In this contribution, we present decadal time series of halogenated source gases monitored at the high altitude station of the Jungfraujoch (46.5°N, 8°E, 3580 m asl) with Fourier Transform Infared (FTIR) spectrometers, within the framework of the Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change. Total column trends presented in previous studies for CFC-11, -12 and HCFC-22, CCl4, HCFC-142b, CF4 and SF6 will be updated using the latest available Jungfraujoch solar observations. Investigations dealing with the definition of approaches to retrieve additional halogenated source gases from FTIR spectra will also be evoked. Our trend results will be critically discussed and compared with measurements performed in the northern hemisphere by the in situ networks. [less ▲]

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See detailRetrieval of ammonia from ground-based FTIR measurements and its use for validation of satellite observations by IASI
Dammers, E; Palm, M; Warneke, T et al

in Geophysical Research Abstracts (2015, April 13), 17

Atmospheric Ammonia (NH3) has a major impact on human health and ecosystem services and plays a major role in the formation of aerosols [Erisman et al.,2013; Paulot and Jacob 2014]. NH3 concentrations are ... [more ▼]

Atmospheric Ammonia (NH3) has a major impact on human health and ecosystem services and plays a major role in the formation of aerosols [Erisman et al.,2013; Paulot and Jacob 2014]. NH3 concentrations are highly variable in space and time with overall short lifetime due to deposition and aerosol formation. The global atmospheric budget of nitrogen and in turn NH3 is still uncertain which asks for more ground-based and satellite observations around the world. Recent papers have described the possibility to measure NH3 with satellite infrared sounders which open up the way for calculations of global and regional nitrogen budgets [Clarisse et al 2009,Van Damme et al 2014a]. Validation of the satellite observations is essential to determine the uncertainty in the signal and its potential use. So far available surface layer observations of atmospheric NH3 concentrations have been used for comparisons with total columns retrieved from satellite observations [Van Damme 2014b]. We developed a retrieval for NH3 column density concentrations (molecules NH3/cm2) by fitting a set of spectral windows to ground-based solar absorption Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) measurements with the spectral fitting program SFIT4 [Hase et al., 2004]. The retrieval is then applied to FTIR measurements from a set of spectrometer sites from the Network for detection of Atmospheric Composition Change (NDACC) to retrieve NH3 columns for the sites located in Bremen, Germany; Lauder, New Zealand; Jungfraujoch, Switzerland; and the island of Reunion, France. Using eight years (2005-2013) of retrieved NH3 columns clear seasonal cycles are observed for each of the stations. Maximum concentrations can be related to NH3 emission sources, specific for the regions. A comparison between the retrieved NH3 columns and observations from the recent IASI- NH3 product [Van Damme et al, 2014a] using strict spatial and temporal criteria for the selection of observations showed a good correlation (R=0.82; slope=0.63). The IASI- NH3 columns for the Bremen and Lauder area show similar temporal cycles when compared to the FTIR observations. [less ▲]

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See detailMeasuring and modelling the intra-day variability of the CO2 & CO2 vertical soil profile production in a Scots pine forest
Longdoz, Bernard ULiege; Goffin, Stéphanie; Parent, Florian et al

in Geophysical Research Abstracts (2015, April), 17

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See detailDiurnal and seasonal variability of CO2 fluxes over a degraded Woodland under a Sudanian climate in Northern Benin (West Africa)
Ago, Expédit Evariste ULiege; Serça, Dominique; Agbossou, Euloge Kossi et al

in Geophysical Research Abstracts (2015, April), 17

Turbulent CO2 exchanges over a degraded woodland were measured during 17 months (from November 2005 to March 2007) by an eddy-covariance system at Nangatchori in the northern part of Benin, West Africa ... [more ▼]

Turbulent CO2 exchanges over a degraded woodland were measured during 17 months (from November 2005 to March 2007) by an eddy-covariance system at Nangatchori in the northern part of Benin, West Africa. The site (Lat 9.65°N, Long 1.74°E, Alt: 432 m), under a Sudanian climate, is one of the sites that were equipped in the framework of the international AMMA-CATH program. The site was highly disturbed during preceding years by illegal tree logging, agricultural activities, cattle pasture, and bushfire. The footprint area is mainly formed by herbs and crops with some sparse shrubs and trees. Fluxes data were completed during the same period by meteorological measurements made at the Nalohou site located approximately 20 km from Nangatchori, and by an inventory of dominating species on 1km2 area around the tower during the wet season. Fluxes response to climatic variables was analyzed. The annual drought and moisture cycle was found to be the main controlling factor of the ecosystem dynamics. A very clear response of CO2 fluxes to PPFD appears, but is different according to seasons. During wet season, CO2 uptake increases with increasing PPFD following a typical curvilinear function and saturates for high PPFD (PPFD > 1000 µmol m-2 s-1), while during dry season, a very weak linear response of CO2 fluxes was observed. No clear dependency of the total ecosystem respiration on temperature was observed. At an annual scale (from November 1st 2005 to October 31st 2006), net carbon sequestered by the ecosystem was 18 +- 5 g C m-2. Finally, with respect to the water use the ecosystem appeared to be more efficient during morning and wet season than during afternoon and dry period. [less ▲]

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See detailThe CROSTVOC project – an integrated approach to study the effect of stress on BVOC exchange between agricultural crops and grassland ecosystems and the atmosphere
Amelynck, Crist; Heinesch, Bernard ULiege; Aubinet, Marc ULiege et al

in Geophysical Research Abstracts (2015, April), 17

Global changes in atmospheric composition and climate are expected to affect BVOC exchange between terrestrial vegetation and the atmosphere through changes in the drivers of constitutive BVOC emissions ... [more ▼]

Global changes in atmospheric composition and climate are expected to affect BVOC exchange between terrestrial vegetation and the atmosphere through changes in the drivers of constitutive BVOC emissions and by increases in frequency and intensity of biotic or abiotic stress episodes. Indeed, several studies indicate changes in the emission patterns of constitutive BVOCs and emission of stress-induced BVOCs following heat, drought and oxidative stress, amongst others. Relating changes in BVOC emissions to the occurrence of one or multiple stressors in natural environmental conditions is not straightforward and only few field studies have dealt with it, especially for agricultural crop and grassland ecosystems. The CROSTVOC project aims to contribute in filling this knowledge gap in three ways. Firstly, it aims at performing long-term BVOC emission field measurements from maize (Zea mays L.) and wheat (Triticum aestivum L.), two important crop species on the global scale, and from grassland. This should lead to a better characterization of (mainly oxygenated) BVOC emissions from these understudied ecosystems, allowing a better representation of those emissions in air quality and atmospheric chemistry and transport models. BVOC fluxes are obtained by the Disjunct Eddy Covariance by mass scanning (DEC-MS) technique, using a hs-PTR-MS instrument for BVOC analysis. Secondly, the eddy covariance BVOC flux measurements (especially at the grassland site) will be accompanied by ozone flux, chlorophyll fluorescence, photosynthesis and soil moisture measurements, amongst others, to allow linking alterations in BVOC emissions to stress episodes. Simultaneously, automated dynamic enclosures will be deployed in order to detect specific abiotic and biotic stress markers by PTR-MS and identify them unambiguously by GC-MS. Thirdly, the field measurements will be accompanied by laboratory BVOC flux measurements in an environmental chamber in order to better disentangle the responses of the BVOC emissions to driving factors that co-occur in field conditions and to determine the influence of single abiotic stressors on BVOC emissions. Next to a general presentation, some preliminary results of the project will be shown. [less ▲]

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See detailImproving energy partitioning and the nighttime energy balance by implementation of a multi-layer energy budget in ORCHIDEE-CAN
Chen, Yiying; Ryder, James; Naudts, Kim et al

in Geophysical Research Abstracts (2015, April), 17

Canopy structure is one of the most important vegetation characteristics for land-atmosphere interactions as it determines the energy and scalar exchanges between land surface and overlay air mass. In ... [more ▼]

Canopy structure is one of the most important vegetation characteristics for land-atmosphere interactions as it determines the energy and scalar exchanges between land surface and overlay air mass. In this study we evaluated the performance of a newly developed multi-layer energy budget (Ryder et al., 2014) in a land surface model, ORCHIDEE-CAN (Naudts et al., 2014), which simulates canopy structure and can be coupled to an atmospheric model using an implicit procedure. Furthermore, a vertical discrete drag parametrization scheme was also incorporated into this model, in order to obtain a better description of the sub-canopy wind profile simulation. Site level datasets, including the top-of-the-canopy and sub-canopy observations made available from eight flux observation sites, were collected in order to conduct this evaluation. The geo-location of the collected observation sites crossed climate zones from temperate to boreal and the vegetation types included deciduous, evergreen broad leaved and evergreen needle leaved forest with maximum LAI ranging from 2.1 to 7.0. First, we used long-term top-of-the-canopy measurements to analyze the performance of the current one-layer energy budget in ORCHIDEE-CAN. Three major processes were identified for improvement through the implementation of a multi-layer energy budget: 1) night time radiation balance, 2) energy partitioning during winter and 3) prediction of the ground heat flux. Short-term sub-canopy observations were used to calibrate the parameters in sub-canopy radiation, turbulence and resistances modules with an automatic tuning process following the maximum gradient of the user-defined objective function. The multi-layer model is able to capture the dynamic of sub-canopy turbulence, temperature and energy fluxes with imposed LAI profile and optimized parameter set at a site level calibration. The simulation result shows the improvement both on the nighttime energy balance and energy partitioning during winter and presents a better Taylor skill score, compared to the result from single layer simulation. The importance of using the multi-layer energy budget in a land surface model for coupling to the atmospheric model will also be discussed in this presentation. [less ▲]

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See detailBiogenic Volatile Organic Compound (BVOC) emissions from agricultural crop species: is guttation a possible source for methanol emissions following light/dark transition?
Mozaffar, Ahsan ULiege; Amelynck, Crist; Bachy, Aurélie ULiege et al

in Geophysical Research Abstracts (2015, April), 17(EGU2015-2110-1),

In the framework of the CROSTVOC (CROp STress VOC) project, the exchange of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) between two important agricultural crop species, maize and winter wheat, and the ... [more ▼]

In the framework of the CROSTVOC (CROp STress VOC) project, the exchange of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) between two important agricultural crop species, maize and winter wheat, and the atmosphere has recently been measured during an entire growing season by using the eddy covariance technique. Because of the co-variation of BVOC emission drivers in field conditions, laboratory studies were initiated in an environmental chamber in order to disentangle the responses of the emissions to variations of the individual environmental parameters (such as PPFD and temperature) and to diverse abiotic stress factors. Young plants were enclosed in transparent all-Teflon dynamic enclosures (cuvettes) through which BVOC-free and RH-controlled air was sent. BVOC enriched air was subsequently sampled from the plant cuvettes and an empty cuvette (background) and analyzed for BVOCs in a high sensitivity Proton-Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometer (hs-PTR-MS) and for CO2 in a LI-7000 non-dispersive IR gas analyzer. Emissions were monitored at constant temperature (25 °C) and at a stepwise varying PPFD pattern (0-650 µmol m-2 s-1). For maize plants, sudden light/dark transitions at the end of the photoperiod were accompanied by prompt and considerable increases in methanol (m/z 33) and water vapor (m/z 39) emissions. Moreover, guttation droplets appeared on the sides and the tips of the leaves within a few minutes after light/dark transition. Therefore the assumption has been raised that methanol is also coming out with guttation fluid from the leaves. Consequently, guttation fluid was collected from young maize and wheat plants, injected in an empty enclosure and sampled by PTR-MS. Methanol and a large number of other compounds were observed from guttation fluid. Recent studies have shown that guttation from agricultural crops frequently occurs in field conditions. Further research is required to find out the source strength of methanol emissions by this guttation phenomenon in real environmental conditions. [less ▲]

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See detailComparison of soil water potential sensors
Degré, Aurore ULiege; Cadwell, Todd; van der Ploeg, Martine

in Geophysical Research Abstracts (2015)

Temporal and spatial monitoring of soil water potential and soil water content are necessary for quantifying water flow in the domains of hydrology, soil science and crop production as knowledge of the ... [more ▼]

Temporal and spatial monitoring of soil water potential and soil water content are necessary for quantifying water flow in the domains of hydrology, soil science and crop production as knowledge of the soil water retention curve is important for solving Richards’ equation. Numerous measurement techniques exist nowadays that use various physical properties of the soil-water complex to record changes in soil water content or soil water potential. Laboratory techniques are very useful to determine static properties of the soil water retention curve, and have been used to show the impacts of hysteresis. Yet, other spatiotemporal dynamics resulting from for example growing root systems, biological activity, periodic tillage and their impact on the soil structure cannot satisfactory be quantified in static setups in the laboratory. ). To be able to quantify the influence of soil heterogeneity, and spatiotemporal dynamics on the soil water retention curve, an in situ approach combining soil moisture and soil water potential measurements could provide useful data. Such an in situ approach would require sensors that can measure a representative part of the soil water retention curve. The volumetric soil water content is often measured using time domain reflectometry, and has gained widespread acceptance as a standard electronic means of volumetric water content measurement. To measure the soil water potential, water filled tensiometers are used in most studies. Unfortunately, their range remains limited due to cavitation. Recently, several new sensors for use under in situ conditions have been proposed to cover a wider range of pressure head: Polymer tensiometers, MPS (Decagon) and pF-meter (ecoTech). In this study, we present the principles behind each measurement technique. Then we present the results of a fully controlled experiment where we compared two MPS sensors, two pF-meter sensors and two POT sensors in the same repacked soil. It allows us to discuss advantages and disadvantages of each method. A CS616 volumetric water content probe was installed to compare in situ measured retention curves with laboratory measured retention curves for each method. [less ▲]

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See detailImpact of stone content on soil moisture measurement with capacitive sensors 10HS (Decagon)
Deraedt, Deborah ULiege; Bernard, Julien ULiege; Biettlot, Louise ULiege et al

in Geophysical Research Abstracts (2015), 17

Lot of soil survey focused on agricultural soils. For practical reasons, those soils have a low stone content. So, most of the soil water content sensors are placed on low stone content soils and the ... [more ▼]

Lot of soil survey focused on agricultural soils. For practical reasons, those soils have a low stone content. So, most of the soil water content sensors are placed on low stone content soils and the calibration equations are developed for them. Yet some researches take an interest in forest soils that are often much different from the previous ones. The differences lie in their stone content and their slope. Lots of studies have proved the importance of making soil specific calibration of the soil water content sensor. As our lab use regularly the 10HS sensors (Decagon Devices, United States) in forested soil, we decided to evaluate the importance of the stone content in the soil moisture measurement. The soil used for this experimentation comes from Gembloux (50◦33’54.9”N, 4◦42’11.3”E). It is silt that has been sieved at 2 mm to remove the gravel. The stones used to form the samples come from an experimental site located in the Belgian Ardennes (50◦1’52.6”N, 4◦53’22.5”E). They are mainly composed of schist with some quartz and sandstone elements. Initially, only five samples were constructed with three replications each. The size and the proportion of stones were the variables. Stones were classified in two groups, the first contains gravels whose size is less than 1,5 cm and a the second contains gravels whose size is comprised between 2 and 3 cm. The proportions of stone selected for the experiment are 0, 20 and 40%. In order to generate validation data, two more samples were constructed with intermediate proportion of stone content (30%). The samples were built in PVC container which dimensions are slightly bigger than the sensor volume of influence (1.1-1.3l). The soil samples were saturated and then dried on a thermal chamber set at about 32◦C. During at least 14 days, the samples soil water content was determined by the sensor measurement with the Procheck read-out system (Decagon Devices, United State) and by weighting the samples thrice a day. The evolution of the soil sample height was monitored as well. As first result, the stone content is a parameter that seems to influence soil water content. The stone size is no important. Because soil moisture deserves to be measured accurately in every soil and to confirm the first results the experiment is going on with more samples, different stone proportions, other sensor positioning and a natural air drying. [less ▲]

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See detailDiachronical soil surveys: a way to quantify long term diffuse erosion
Pineux, Nathalie ULiege; Michel, Brieuc ULiege; Legrain, Xavier ULiege et al

in Geophysical Research Abstracts (2015), 17

The loess belt of Western Europe is a high-risk area regarding diffuse erosion. It is due to the climate and the topography but also to the soil type. Loamy soils are naturally highly sensitive to diffuse ... [more ▼]

The loess belt of Western Europe is a high-risk area regarding diffuse erosion. It is due to the climate and the topography but also to the soil type. Loamy soils are naturally highly sensitive to diffuse erosion. Hence, these soils are very fertile. So, they are intensively cultivated which increases their sensitivity to erosion. Sheet erosion is an erosion type strongly represented in these regions. Contrarily to the concentrated form of erosion which happens more brutally, sheet erosion needs long-term observation time-scales, which remains rare. In Belgium, a soil map was established in 1956. This map is quite detailed and notably informs about the different horizons which are in the profile (ploughed horizon, eluvial horizon, clay included between the horizons, carbonate-free loess horizon, and all these were characterised by drainage class) and their depth. It was based on a dense augering network across the country (one point every 75 meters). A new augering campaign was done again in 2014. It consisted in one observation every 50 meters on an agricultural watershed of 124 hectares located in the centre of Belgium. This catchment has been cultivated since the 14th century and is representative of the local context (gentle slope (3-8%), plot size (mean value of 10 ha), …). We compared the two soil maps produced on this site with a 58years time lapse. Results show that the large majority of the watershed falls from upslope soils with weak erosion to slope soils with strong erosion. The soil thickness diminished in some zones to 1m10 (minimum estimation) of erosion. This comparison shows that very few upslope soils are preserved. On the other hand, the areas where colluviums were present to the full depth stay at the same place in the main thalweg of the watershed. Other areas on the watershed seem to be subject to a (minimum estimation) of 40cm of sediments deposition. Large areas in the watershed suffered from erosion and came to deposition areas as the clay horizon is no longer observed under the colluviums. It can be highlighted that soil depths were worryingly lost during 58 years of tillage and that some soils were converted to colluviums which is of lower agronomical quality than the original soils which had a clay horizon below to keep water. Diachronical soil survey offers an unique insight of long term diffuse erosion and should demonstrate the importance of preserving soils even in regions where agricultural yields are not (yet) affected by erosion. [less ▲]

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See detailContact resistance problems applying ERT on low bulk density forested stony soils Is there a solution?
Deraedt, Deborah ULiege; Touzé, Camille; Robert, Tanguy et al

in Geophysical Research Abstracts (2015), 17

Electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) has often been put forward as a promising tool to quantify soil water and solute fluxes in a non-invasive way. In our experiment, we wanted to determine ... [more ▼]

Electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) has often been put forward as a promising tool to quantify soil water and solute fluxes in a non-invasive way. In our experiment, we wanted to determine preferential flow processes along a forested hillslope using a saline tracer with ERT. The experiment was conducted in the Houille watershed, subcatchment of the Meuse located in the North of Belgian Ardennes (50˚1’52.6”N, 4˚53’22.5”E). The climate is continental but the soil under spruce (Picea abies (L.) Karst.) and Douglas fire stand (Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirb.) Franco) remains quite dry (19% WVC in average) during the whole year. The soil is Cambisol and the parent rock is Devonian schist covered with variable thickness of silty loam soil. The soil density ranges from 1.13 to 1.87 g/cm3 on average. The stone content varies from 20 to 89% and the soil depth fluctuates between 70 and 130 cm. The ERT tests took place on June 1st 2012, April 1st, 2nd and 3rd 2014 and May 12th 2014. We used the Terrameter LS 12 channels (ABEM, Sweden) in 2012 test and the DAS-1 (Multi-Phase Technologies, United States) in 2014. Different electrode configurations and arrays were adopted for different dates (transect and grid arrays and Wenner – Schlumberger, Wenner alpha and dipole-dipole configurations). During all tests, we systematically faced technical problems, mainly related to bad electrode contact. The recorded data show values of contact resistance above 14873 Ω (our target value would be below 3000 Ω). Subsequently, we tried to improve the contact by predrilling the soil and pouring water in the electrode holes. The contact resistance improved to 14040 Ω as minimum. The same procedure with liquid mud was then tested to prevent quick percolation of the water from the electrode location. As a result, the lower contact resistance dropped to 11745 Ω. Finally, we applied about 25 litre of saline solution (CaCl2, 0.75g/L) homogeneously on the electrode grid. The minimum value of contact resistance reduced to 5222 Ω. This improved the contact resistance substantially, but complicates the execution of a pulse tracer experiment. To date we did not find any better solution to this problem and we keep searching a way to improve the contact resistance in stony forested soils with very low bulk density. We would like to exchange on these questions with EGU attendees in order to improve the experimental design or point out a new research path for these specific conditions. This could lead to enhance the use of ERT in soils with low density and high stone content. [less ▲]

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