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See detailSource parameters of the 2008 Bukavu-Cyangugu earthquake estimated from InSAR and teleseismic data
d'Oreye, Nicolas; Gonzalez, P.; Shuler, A. et al

in Geophysical Journal International (2011)

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See detailAnalysis of three-component ambient vibration array measurements
Fäh, Donat; Stamm, Gabriela; Havenith, Hans-Balder ULg

in Geophysical Journal International (2008), 172

Both synthetic and observed ambient vibration array data are analysed using high-resolution beam-forming. In addition to a classical analysis of the vertical component, this paper presents results derived ... [more ▼]

Both synthetic and observed ambient vibration array data are analysed using high-resolution beam-forming. In addition to a classical analysis of the vertical component, this paper presents results derived from processing horizontal components.We analyse phase velocities of fundamental and higher mode Rayleigh and Love waves, and particle motions (ellipticity) retrieved from H/V spectral ratios. A combined inversion with a genetic algorithm and a strategy for selecting possible model parameters allow us to define structural models explaining the data. The results from synthetic data for simple models with one or two layers of sediments suggest that, in most cases, the number of layers has to be reduced to a few sediment strata to find the original structure. Generally, reducing the number of soft-sediment layers in the inversion process with genetic algorithms leads to a class of models that are less smooth. They have a stronger impedance contrast between sediments and bedrock. Combining Love and Rayleigh wave dispersion curves with the ellipticity of the fundamental mode Rayleigh waves has some advantages. Scatter is reduced when compared to using structural models obtained only from Rayleigh wave phase velocity curves. By adding information from Love waves some structures can be excluded. Another possibility for constraining inversion results is to include supplementary geological or borehole information. Analysing radial components also can provide segments of Rayleigh wave dispersion curves for modes not seen on the vertical component. Finally, using ellipticity information allows us to confine the total depth of the soft sediments. For real sites, considerable variability in the measured phase velocity curves is observed. This comes from lateral changes in the structure or seismic sources within the array. Constraining the inversion by combining Love and Rayleigh wave information can help reduce such problems. Frequency bands in which the Rayleigh wave dispersion curves show considerable scatter are often better resolved by Love waves. Information from the horizontal component can be used to correctly assign the mode number to the different phase–velocity curve segments, especially when two modes seem to merge at osculation points. Such merging of modes is usually observed for Rayleigh waves and thus can be partly solved if additional information from the Love waves and the horizontal component of Rayleigh waves is considered. Whenever a site presents a velocity inversion below the top layer, Love wave data clearly helps to better constrain the solution. [less ▲]

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See detailGeophysical investigation and numerical modelling of unstable slopes: case-study of Kainama (Kyrgyzstan)
Danneels, Gaëlle ULg; Bourdeau, Céline ULg; Torgoev, I. et al

in Geophysical Journal International (2008), 175

The presence of massive Quaternary loess units at the eastern border of the Fergana Basin (Kyrgyzstan, Central Asia) makes this area particularly prone to the development of catastrophic loess earthflows ... [more ▼]

The presence of massive Quaternary loess units at the eastern border of the Fergana Basin (Kyrgyzstan, Central Asia) makes this area particularly prone to the development of catastrophic loess earthflows, causing damages and injuries almost every year. Efficient disaster management requires a good understanding of the main causes of these mass movements, that is, increased groundwater pressure and seismic shaking. This paper focuses on the Kainama earthflow, mainly composed of loess, which occurred in 2004 April. Its high velocity and the long run-out zone caused the destruction of 12 houses and the death of 33 people. In summer 2005, a field survey consisting of geophysical and seismological measurements was carried out along the adjacent slope. By combination and geostatistical analysis of these data, a reliable 3-D model of the geometry and properties of the subsurface layers, as shown in the first part of the paper, was created. The analysis of the seismological data allowed us to point out a correlation between the thickness of the loess cover and the measured resonance frequencies and associated amplification potential. The second part of this paper is focused on the study of the seismic response of the slope by numerical simulations, using a 2-D finite difference code named FLAC.Modelling of the seismic amplification potential along the slope confirmed the results obtained from the seismological survey—strong amplifications at the crest and bottom of the slope where there is a thick loess cover and almost no amplification in the middle part of the slope. Furthermore, dynamic slope stability analyses were conducted to assess the influence of local amplifications and increased groundwater pressures on the slope failure. The results of the dynamic modelling, although preliminary, show that a combination of seismic and hydrologic origin (pore pressure build-up during the seismic shaking) is the most probable scenario responsible for the 2004 failure. [less ▲]

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See detailS-wave velocity measurements applied to the seismic microzonation of Basel, Upper Rhine Graben
Havenith, Hans-Balder ULg; Fäh, Donat; Polom, Ulrich et al

in Geophysical Journal International (2007), 170

An extensive S-wave velocity survey had been carried out in the frame of a recent seismic microzonation study of Basel and the border areas between Switzerland, France and Germany. The aim was to better ... [more ▼]

An extensive S-wave velocity survey had been carried out in the frame of a recent seismic microzonation study of Basel and the border areas between Switzerland, France and Germany. The aim was to better constrain the seismic amplification potential of the surface layers. The survey included single station (H/V spectral ratios) and ambient vibration array measurements carried out by the Swiss team, aswell as active S-wave velocity measurements performed by the German and French partners. This paper is focused on the application of the array technique, which consists in recording ambient vibrations with a number of seismological stations. Several practical aspects related to the field measurements are outlined. The signal processing aims to determine the dispersion curves of surface waves contained in the ambient vibrations. The inversion of the dispersion curve provides a 1-D S-wave velocity model for the investigated site down to a depth related to the size of the array. Since the size of arrays is theoretically not limited, arrays are known to be well adapted for investigations in deep sediment basins, such as the Upper Rhine Graben including the area of the city of Basel. In this region, 27 array measurements with varying station configurations have been carried out to determine the S-wave velocity properties of the geological layers down to a depth of 100–250 m. For eight sites, the outputs of the array measurements have been compared with the results of the other investigations using active sources, the spectral analysis of surface waves (SASW) and S-wave reflection seismics. Borehole information available for a few sites could be used to calibrate the geophysical measurements. By this comparison, the advantages and disadvantages of the array method and the other techniques are outlined with regard to the effectiveness of the methods and the required investigation depth. The dispersion curves measured with the arrays and the SASW technique were also combined and inverted simultaneously to use the advantages of both methods. Finally, the paper outlines and discusses the contribution of the S-wave velocity survey to the new seismic microzonation of the Basel region. In this regard one major outcome of the survey is the quantification of vertical and lateral changes of the S-wave velocity, due to changing lithology or changing compaction and degree of weathering of the layers. [less ▲]

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See detailIndication of the uplift of the Ardenne in long-term gravity variations in Membach (Belgium)
Francis, Olivier; Van Camp, Michel; van Dam, Tonie et al

in Geophysical Journal International (2004), 158

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See detailFirst order elastic modeling of the Aden ridge propagation and the Anatolian extrusion process
Hubert, Aurelia ULg; King, G. C. P.; Manighetti, I. et al

in Geophysical Journal International (2003), 153

The evolution of the Gulf of Aden and the Anatolian Fault systems are modelled using the principles of elastic fracture mechanics usually applied to smaller scale cracks or faults. The lithosphere is ... [more ▼]

The evolution of the Gulf of Aden and the Anatolian Fault systems are modelled using the principles of elastic fracture mechanics usually applied to smaller scale cracks or faults. The lithosphere is treated as a plate, and simple boundary conditions are applied that correspond to the known plate boundary geometry and slip vectors. The models provide a simple explanation for many observed geological features. For the Gulf of Aden the model predicts why the ridge propagated from east to west from the Owen Fracture Zone towards the Afar and the overall form of its path. The smaller en echelon offsets can be explained by upward propagation from the initially created mantle dyke while the larger ones may be attributed to the propagating rupture interacting with pre-existing structures. For Anatolia the modelling suggests that the East Anatolian Fault was created before the North Anatolian Fault could form. Once both faults were formed however, activity could switch between them. The time scales over which this should take place are not known, but evidence for switching can be found in the historical seismicity. For Aden and Anatolia pre-existing structures or inhomogeneous stress fields left from earlier orogenic events have modified the processes of propagation and without an understanding of the existence of such features the propagation processes cannot be fully understood. Furthermore a propagating fault can extend into an active region where it would not have initiated. The North Anatolian Fault encountered slow but active extension when it entered the Aegean about 5 Ma and the stress field associated with the extending fault has progressively modified Aegean extension. In the central Aegean activity has been reduced while to the north-west on features such as the Gulfs of Evvia and Corinth activity has been increased. The field observation that major structures propagate and the success of simple elastic mod- els suggest that the continental crust behaves in an elastic-brittle or elastic-plastic fashion even though laboratory tests may be interpreted to suggest viscous behaviour. There are major prob- lems in scaling from the behaviour of small homogeneous samples to the large heterogeneous mantle and large-scale observations should be treated more seriously than extrapolations of the behaviour of laboratory experiments over many orders of magnitude in space and time. The retention of long-term elasticity and localised failure suggests a similar gross rheology for the oceanic and continental lithospheres. Even though it is incorrect to attribute differences in behaviour to the former being rigid (i.e. elastic) and the latter viscous, oceanic and continental lithosphere behave in different ways. Unlike oceanic crust, continental crust is buoyant and cannot be simply created or destroyed. The process of thickening or thinning works against gravity preventing large displacements on extensional or contractional features in the upper mantle. The equivalents of ridge or subduction systems are suppressed before they can accom- modate large displacements and activity must shift elsewhere. On the other hand, strike-slip boundaries and extrusion processes are favoured. [less ▲]

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See detailSecondary fabrics revealed by remanence anisotropy: methodological study and examples from plutonic rocks
Trindade, Ricardo I.F.; Bouchez, Jean-Luc; Bolle, Olivier ULg et al

in Geophysical Journal International (2001), 147(2), 310-318

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