References of "Future Neurology"
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See detailOur rapidly changing understanding of acute and chronic disorders of consciousness: challenges for neurologists
Gantner, Sylvia ULg; BODART, Olivier ULg; Laureys, Steven ULg et al

in Future Neurology (2013), 8(1), 43-54

A number of recent studies suggest that some ‘vegetative state’ patients have been misdiagnosed, judging by their ability to follow commands and in some cases even communicate through brain activity. Such ... [more ▼]

A number of recent studies suggest that some ‘vegetative state’ patients have been misdiagnosed, judging by their ability to follow commands and in some cases even communicate through brain activity. Such studies highlight the difficulty in forming a diagnosis based only on behavioral assessments. We think that neuroimaging and electrophysiology methods will be used more frequently in clinical settings, integrated with existing behavioral assessments. Such efforts are expected to lead to a more accurate understanding of individual patients’ cognitive abilities or even provide prognostic indicators. In terms of treatment planning (i.e., pain management and end-of-life decision-making), patients with disorders of consciousness are now offered the possibility of expressing their preferences by means of brain–computer interfaces. What remains to be clarified is the degree to which such indirect responses can be considered reliable and of legal representation. [less ▲]

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See detailContribution of sleep to memory consolidation
Shaffii-Le Bourdiec, Anahita; Muto, Vincenzo ULg; Mascetti, Laura et al

in Future Neurology (2010), 5(2), 325-338

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See detailIntraveinous paracetamol: a review of efficacy and safety in therapeutic use
Malaise, Olivier ULg; Bruyère, Olivier ULg; Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg

in Future Neurology (2007), 2(6), 673-688

Paracetamol is well established as a leading nonprescription antipyretic analgesic drug and is available in oral, rectal or intravenous forms. However, except for oral paracetamol, there is a marked ... [more ▼]

Paracetamol is well established as a leading nonprescription antipyretic analgesic drug and is available in oral, rectal or intravenous forms. However, except for oral paracetamol, there is a marked discrepancy between the extent to which paracetamol is used and the available evidence for an analgesic effect in postoperative pain. This review mainly focuses on intravenous paracetamol. Its efficacy and safety are analyzed, as well as its use in therapeutics, alone or in combination. The morphine-sparing, additive and antihyperalgesia effects of intravenous paracetamol are also reviewed. The analyses are divided into several sections, comparing the efficacy of intravenous paracetamol with placebo, other forms of paracetamol or analgesic agents and analyzing its efficacy in multimodal therapy combined with NSAIDs or a morphinic agent. [less ▲]

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