References of "Forest Policy and Economics"
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See detailA look at Intact Forest Landscapes and their relevance in Central African forest policy
Haurez, Barbara ULg; Daïnou, Kasso ULg; Vermeulen, Cédric ULg et al

in Forest Policy and Economics (2017), 80

Tropical forests are major providers of natural resources and ecosystem services but their ecological functions are at threat, due to increasing human pressure linked to economic development. The ... [more ▼]

Tropical forests are major providers of natural resources and ecosystem services but their ecological functions are at threat, due to increasing human pressure linked to economic development. The identification of priority areas for conservation is crucial for land use planning to ensure the protection of biodiversity and ecological function. Intact Forest Landscapes (IFLs), as defined by Greenpeace and World Resources Institute (WRI), are areas of the forest ecosystems not subjected to human activities. They have beenidentified by mapping human disturbances through remote sensing. Contrary to similar global-scale concepts, IFLs have been integrated into the standards of the certification body Forest Stewardship Council (FSC) and therefore have practical implications for forest management policies. The Motion 65, approved in the general assembly of FSC in 2014, mandates the protection of IFLs located in FSC certified logging concessions. Until the implementation of national standards, forestry operations are banished from 80% of the IFL area within each forest management unit. To trace the history and evaluate the suitability of IFLs in the Central African context, we searched for documents related to the IFL method, and related approaches focusing on the identification of areas devoid of human disturbances. The IFL method is simple and cost-effective and allows for a global assessment of the influence of human infrastructures and industrial exploitation on forests However, the method does not consider the situation below the canopy and those forest components not visible by satellites. For example, hunting, one of the main threats faced by wildlife in Central African forests today, cannot be detected with satellite imagery. On the other hand, other anthropogenic activities which remote sensing may detect may be compatible with forest ecosystem conservation. To better tailor the IFL approach to Central African forests, we recommend (i) the consideration of wildlife communities in the intactness analysis, (ii) a thorough evaluation of the impacts of human activities on forest ecosystems, and (iii) the integration of local stakeholders and governments in the design of land management strategies to respond to social, economic and environmental needs [less ▲]

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See detailFunctioning of farm-grown timber value chains: Lessons from the smallholder-produced teak (Tectona grandis L.f.) poles value chain in Southern Benin
Aoudji, Augustin K.N.; Adégbidi, Anselme; Agbo, Valentin et al

in Forest Policy and Economics (2012), 15(February 2012), 98-107

The study examined the functioning of the smallholder-produced teak poles value chain in Southern Benin from an analytical perspective combining the governance structure, the institutional environment ... [more ▼]

The study examined the functioning of the smallholder-produced teak poles value chain in Southern Benin from an analytical perspective combining the governance structure, the institutional environment, and the distribution of consumer price among chain actors. The objective was to identify bottlenecks militating against improved functioning of the farm-grown timber value chains. A fieldwork was carried from August 2008 to September 2010, to identify the agents and the organisations involved in the value chain. Data were collected on the functions performed, the costs borne and the income received by each category of agent, the marketing channels within the value chain, the interactions among agents, the consumption of the product, and the role of the organisations connected to the value chain. This was done by combining semi-structured interviews, focus group meetings, and structured interviews. In addition, data were collected on the institutional environment from both primary and secondary sources. The following agents were involved in the value chain: nurserymen, planters, local intermediaries, brokers, traders, and consumers. The forest service was the main governmental organisation involved in the functioning of the value chain. The governance structure in the value chain was driven by a mixture of government and the market. Various weaknesses were found in the forest policy, the forest regulation and their implementation. Planters’ share of consumer price was lower than traders’ return. The relevant policy options to address these issues were discussed. [less ▲]

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See detailSatisfaction across urban consumers of smallholder-produced teak (Tectona grandis L.f.) poles in South Benin
Aoudji, Augustin K. N.; Adégbidi, Anselme; Ganglo, Jean C. et al

in Forest Policy and Economics (2011), 13(8), 642-651

The study used the expectancy-disconfirmation framework to investigate the satisfaction among urban consumers of teak pole in South Benin, so as to identify the areas where interventions are needed to ... [more ▼]

The study used the expectancy-disconfirmation framework to investigate the satisfaction among urban consumers of teak pole in South Benin, so as to identify the areas where interventions are needed to secure market opportunity for smallholder forestry. A survey was conducted in five cities; and 223 household-heads were interviewed using systematic sampling, with a random start. Data were collected on socio-demographic characteristics, teak pole consumption forms, behaviour patterns, and motivations. Respondents also rated their expectations and perceptions for a set of nine attributes on a 7 points Likert scale. Hierarchical ascending cluster analysis was performed to identify consumer segments; and satisfaction level was analysed per segment, by determining the gap between expectations and perceptions, for all attributes. Four consumer segments were identified; and socio-demographic profiles differed across those segments. Competitive price was an important purchasing motivation across the identified segments. Consumers were dissatisfied with price, availability, knot frequency, bending, length, hardness, and durability of teak pole. The efforts to meet the consumer expectations should be concentrated on building farmers’ capacity in silvicultural management, and ensuring the availability of good planting material. The issue of competitive price might be addressed, through the improvement of the overall efficiency in the value chain. [less ▲]

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