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See detailRaman spectroscopy and laser desorption mass spectrometry for minimal destructive forensic analysis of black and color inkjet printed documents
Heudt, Laetitia ULg; Debois, Delphine ULg; Zimmerman, Tyler ULg et al

in Forensic Science International (2012), 219

Inkjet ink analysis is the best way to discriminate between printed documents, or even though more difficult, to connect an inkjet printed document with a brand or model of printers. Raman spectroscopy ... [more ▼]

Inkjet ink analysis is the best way to discriminate between printed documents, or even though more difficult, to connect an inkjet printed document with a brand or model of printers. Raman spectroscopy and laser desorption mass spectrometry (LDMS) have been demonstrated as powerful tools for dyes and pigments analysis, which are ink components. The aim of this work is to evaluate the aforementioned techniques for inkjet inks analysis in terms of discriminating power, information quality, and nondestructive capability. So, we investigated 10 different inkjet ink cartridges (primary colors and black), 7 from the HP manufacturer and one each from Epson, Canon and Lexmark. This paper demonstrates the capabilities of three methods: Raman spectroscopy, LDMS and MALDI-MS. Raman spectroscopy, as it is preferable to try the nondestructive approach first, is successfully adapted to the analysis of color printed documents in most cases. For analysis of color inkjet inks by LDMS, we show that a MALDI matrix (9- aminoacridine, 9AA) is needed to desorb and to ionize dyes from most inkjet inks (except Epson inks). Therefore, a method was developed to apply the 9AA MALDI matrix directly onto the piece of paper while avoiding analyte spreading. The obtained mass spectra are very discriminating and lead to information about ink additives and paper compositions. Discrimination of black inkjet printed documents is more difficult because of the common use of carbon black as the principal pigment. We show for the first time the possibility to discriminate between two black-printed documents coming from different, as well as from the same, manufacturers. Mass spectra recorded from black inks in positive ion mode LDMS detect polyethylene glycol polymers which have characteristic mass distributions and end groups. Moreover, software has been developed for rapid and objective comparison of the low mass range of these positive mode LDMS spectra which have characteristic unknown peaks. [less ▲]

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See detailEffects of hydrated lime and quicklime on the decay of buried human remains using pig cadavers as human body analogues.
Schotsmans, E. M.; Denton, J.; Dekeirsschieter, Jessica ULg et al

in Forensic Science International (2011)

Recent casework in Belgium involving the search for human remains buried with lime, demonstrated the need for more detailed understanding of the effect of different types of lime on cadaver decomposition ... [more ▼]

Recent casework in Belgium involving the search for human remains buried with lime, demonstrated the need for more detailed understanding of the effect of different types of lime on cadaver decomposition and its micro-environment. Six pigs (Sus scrofa) were used as body analogues in field experiments. They were buried without lime, with hydrated lime (Ca(OH)(2)) and with quicklime (CaO) in shallow graves in sandy loam soil in Belgium and recovered after 6months of burial. Observations from these field recoveries informed additional laboratory experiments that were undertaken at the University of Bradford, UK. The combined results of these studies demonstrate that despite conflicting evidence in the literature, hydrated lime and quicklime both delay the decay of the carcass during the first 6months. This study has implications for the investigation of clandestine burials and for a better understanding of archaeological plaster burials. Knowledge of the effects of lime on decomposition processes also has bearing on practices involving burial of animal carcasses and potentially the management of mass graves and mass disasters by humanitarian organisations and DVI teams. [less ▲]

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See detailCadaveric volatile organic compounds released by decaying pig carcases (Sus domesticus L.) in different biotopes.
Dekeirsschieter, Jessica ULg; Verheggen, François ULg; Gohy, Marie et al

in Forensic Science International (2009), 189(1-3), 46-53

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See detailIn search of blood – detection of minute particles using spectroscopic methods
Lepot, Laurent ULg; Gilbert, Bernard ULg; De Wael, Kris et al

in Forensic Science International (2008), 180(1), 37-42

An examination protocol for rapid detection of remnants of blood particles on garments of suspects in bloody murder cases is described. Micro particles of blood are sampled along with fibres and hairs ... [more ▼]

An examination protocol for rapid detection of remnants of blood particles on garments of suspects in bloody murder cases is described. Micro particles of blood are sampled along with fibres and hairs using the tape lifting method. The tapings are searched with a low power microscope for red particles with morphology similar to blood. Presumed blood traces are further examined using microspectrophotometry on the cut out piece of taping. The typical visible spectrum of haemoglobin is characteristic for blood. Alternatively Raman spectroscopy can be used to measure the characteristic vibrational spectrum of haemoglobin. At a later stage, these particles may be removed from the piece of taping in order to extract the blood and attempt to obtain a genetic profile. [less ▲]

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See detailDevelopment of a genetic traceability test in pig based on single nucleotide polymorphism detection
Goffaux, F.; China, B.; Dams, Laureen ULg et al

in Forensic Science International (2005), 151(2-3), 239-247

In order to assure traceability along the meat transformation process, a powerful system is required. The administrative traceability shows limits that the use of genetic markers could overcome. The ... [more ▼]

In order to assure traceability along the meat transformation process, a powerful system is required. The administrative traceability shows limits that the use of genetic markers could overcome. The individual genomes contain sequence differences, basis of the genetic polymorphism of which the genetic markers are the witnesses. Among them, two classes seem to dominate on the traceability field: the microsatellites and the single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP). The aim of this work was to develop a genetic traceability test in pig based on SNPs mainly located in 5' and 3' untranslated regions (UTRs). A set of 21 SNP markers including new SNPs identified in this study and SNPs previously described was selected. A genotyping assay was performed on 96 individuals representing the major crossbred of the pig population in Belgium. Results showed that all individuals tested presented a different genotype. This genotyping method might help the administrative system to guarantee the traceability of pork meat along the transformation process. (c) 2005 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

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